What's the best drill? Cordless? Corded?

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I'm looking into Lowes' 20% off sale and want a new drill. The one I have is a rather weak cordless with the small battery (12v?). I've also lost the charger, but that's another story. Anyway I want to be able to drill in/out 3" screws into studs, and drill into concrete with a masonry bit. I found that the 12v drill didn't have the torque to do it. I borrowed a cheap corded drill the other day and it drove those screws like nothing.
What do you guys recommend? If the price is in the $200's US or lower I don't care about the money. It looks like the most expensive one is a Dewalt 18v. Is this going to match up favorably with a corded drill of the same quality? Will the battery last a long time? I won't be using the drill often but I wan't one that can do everything a decent corded drill can do without the cord hassle.
Thanks for any suggestions,
dwhite
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If you are driving screws most of the time a cordless 19 -24 volt is a great tool for you. Masonary drilling requires a hammer drill,they do make cordless combo hammer/rotory drills that work great on bits up to about 1/4 to 3/8ths.Anything larger than that they just don't have the juice (I have a 19.2 Porter cable, Top of the line drill) If your doing a lot of masonary drilling you can't beat a good old fashion corded hammer drill.

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"Dan White" wrote in message:

<respectfully snipped>
Keep in mind that some of the cheaper cordless critters have plastic gears...
In my humble opinion, I suggest DeWalt. Always been good for me.
Have a nice day, woodstuff
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the
in/out
the
can
Cordless hammer drills are just not up to the task. They may drill several small tapcon holes but anything more is a job for corded. Makita makes a decent corded hammer/regualr two speed/variable for under $200 (cdn)
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Dan:
For driving screws, nothing beats an impact driver. We just completed another test of the Makita 6935DWDE 14.4v Impact Driver and it drove 247 3" long deck screws into "fresh" pressure treated 6 x6 compared to only 171 driven by the Makita 6336DWDE Driver / Drill, also a 14.4v unit.We also compared it ot a DeWalt DW953 12v Driver / Drill that we had on hand as a test sample, and it only drove 45 screws. The best news is that Makita has a special right now that GIVES you a Driver/Drill of the same voltage when you buy either the 6980DWDE 12v or 6935DWDE 14.4v Impact Driver. Of course, you have to send back the rebate certificate by January 15, 2005, and follow all the POP rules etc, But its still a great deal. The Impact driver must be ordered by December 31, 2004. Without turning this into spam, the 12v is going to be a bit over your budget $200, and the 14.4v about $15 more than the 12v. Hope this helps.
Truth in Posting: We sell these.
Jim Ray, President McFeely's Square Drive Screws www.mcfeelys.com

the
in/out
the
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Dan White wrote:

Really depends on what you want to do. I have an 18 volt Dewalt 1/2" hammer drill from their first generation of 18v tools, and its working fine for me, does just about everything I have ever tried to get it to do, never managed to stall it--on low speed I suspect it's stronger than I am. Haven't tried any big bits in masonry, but it handles up to 1/2" adequately for my use, and the screwdriver clutch has an adequate range. If you're going to be doing commercial construction and need a masonry drill or you're a drywall installer and need a powered screwdriver or the like you'll likely want something a bit more specialized, but as an all-round drill/driver it's fine. The new ones have added a third, higher speed, which answers my one real objection to them.
If you're going 3 inches into studs you really should drill a pilot hole--the deWalt will drive reasonably sized deck screws 3 inches without one _if_ the screw head holds up but even with square drive screws if I try that the driver bit usually torques out of the head before the screw is seated.
Batteries don't last forever on any cordless tool. You can get the deWalt batteries rebuilt but with the 18v tools they have a discounted 2-pack that is cheaper than rebuilt batteries, at least the ones I've been able to find. How long they will last depends on how you use them and on your luck--one of mine seems to have an internal short for example--it will charge up and run as long as the others but if I let it sit overnight it goes flat--the others will hold a charge for, well, I don't know how long they'll hold a charge--I've always managed to run them down before they self-discharged--if you don't use it often then recharging the packs once a month would be a good idea I suspect.

--
--John
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On Sat, 18 Dec 2004 09:31:00 -0500, "Dan White"

==================I like my Milwaulkee cordless.... 14.4 v.. much better then my sons DeWalt 18 V drill.... and it seems to be more powerful...but that is only subjective...
Neither could compare with any of my corded drills for drilling 7/8 inch holes in concrete to install anchors for a pool cover... even the little 3/8 inch corded drills ran circles around both Cordless drills ...and pulling out my Dads 1950's era 1/2 inch drill that I inhereted..made quick work of that job...no contest between the 3/8 inch corded and that baby...
For general or limited use around the house or shop then Cordless is just fine. I buy by how the drill feels like in my hand...
For heavy duty work... the few minutes it takes to grab an extention cord will save you time and effort in the long haul...
Bob Griffiths
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Lets see, 110 volt over 12 volt... Humm I wonder which is stronger... 110 volt over 24 volt... Still the 110 volt wins by a land slide. If you need power get corded. IMHO larger voltage drills used near an electrical source make no since. 110 volts stomps battery operated drills. I have had 8 battery operated drills but all so far all have been 12 volt and less. Those drills and my corded do everything I want a hand drill to do. The advantage to cordless are not having a cord to deal with and they get you out of a bind when there is no electricity to plug in to. The big voltage cordless drills are way too heavy for my liking.
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Volts do not mean a lot -- it is the wattage consumption. Admittedly, it is easier for the higher voltage drills to consume the wattage. However many of the cordless have torque that compares favorably with corded drills.
I just do not see all this fuss about the heavy cordless drills. I am no longer a young man (69), I have worked at a desk job all my life, and I find no problem hoisting an 18 Volt cordless.
Dick

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I sort of agree with you for most chores. When you are using it to sink a lot of small screws, the weight and balance becomes more of a factor. I chose to get a Panasonic 15.6 volt because I liked the size and the way it felt to me. Poking a few holes in concrete, I'd go for bigger.
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Excuse the top posting...and tyhe inclusion of the Original post along with the one reply...
Richard you do have me by a few years (I am only 62)..and like the reply I included below I have no problem "bench pressing" a 18 V drill either
BUT find them to be a royal pain...(arm, back, even my rear) when I have to keep it over my head drilling a 100 holes or screwing in a 100 screws in a ceiling etc...
Bob Griffiths

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wrote:

Well lets compare apples to apples. I doubt any cordless could keep up with a drill such as
http://www.dewalt.com/us/products/tool_detail.asp?productID$2 or its Milwaukee equivelant.

Again have you used that 18 volt drill all day long? Or in tight quarters above your head?
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Better, lets s compare to this drill.
http://www.dewalt.com/us/products/tool_detail.asp?productID"
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Leon wrote:

And that can't keep up with an 11KV Robbins tunnel boring machine either. Doesn't mean that the tunnel boring machine is ideal for every purpose.

Was the OP going to be using it all day long in tight quarters above his head?
--
--John
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I do not know, I was replying to anoither post that indicated that the 18 volt models were not that big of a deal for him. Fo me it would be as I tend use drills for extended periods of time rather than for a few holes or screws.

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Leon wrote:

I'd put my 18v DeWalt against my Dad's 15 buck corded McGraw-Edison any day.
It's not the volts that count, it's what you do with them.
--
--John
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Perhaps I should have qualified my comment with a 110 volt and 18 volt that are built for the same job. While an 18 volt drill may stomp a $15 corded when it comes to spinning large bits or sinking long screws, try comparing a corded drill that compares in price to the 18 volt cordless. Like this drill, http://www.dewalt.com/us/products/tool_detail.asp?productID
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On Sat, 18 Dec 2004 09:31:00 -0500, "Dan White"

For corded drills, Milwaukee is good. For cordless, Panasonic. I tend to favor corded tools whenever possible. I bought an industrial extension cord ($30) for the outdoor jobs.
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On Sat, 18 Dec 2004 09:31:00 -0500, "Dan White"

I'd use a hammer drill for going into concrete. As others say, it's going to draw lots of power, so a battery operated model may not be the best choice. However, if your use is infrequent, maybe this is o.k.
I just bought (last weekend) a cordless Milwaukee 14.4. My choice was influenced by the 14.4 volt review in the Tools & Shops issue of FWW. I think this tool strikes a good balance of performance & price. Plus, when I got it it came in a kit with a 1 hour charger and a spare battery. And right now, Milwaukee has a rebate going on that allows you to choose a tool belt, a folding knife or another battery. I chose the battery, so now I'll have 3. With a 1 hour charger, for my use, I'll never run out of juice.
Constuction quality of the tool plays a role too - no plastic for me. Milwaukee and the other top brands use metal gears and other quality features. Check the reviews. My previous drill died last week. Not of any heavy use, but because a plastic boss broke off inside and beat the hell out of the armature resulting in a short in the windings. It went up in smoke. Too bad, so sad. :( What's the point? Too much plastic in the construction of the tool in the wrong place is a bad thing.
You might ask, why not 18v? Well, I'm a hobbiest woodworker and just don't want to hoist the weight of anything that large. And more cells in a cordless pack and it's going to take a crane to lift it. Plus, some tools just shouldn't be cordless. At least not yet. Hammer Drills and Routers come to mind.
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e.

Well The outside shell on my Milwaukee (14.4) is plastic...and yes it will break when dropped off a roof.....I KNOW....
The good news is that a replacement shell retails for about 8 bucks.. Took about 5 minutes to swap it with the broken shell... DAMN the drill looked like new ... lol
Bob Griffiths.
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