What projects did you make in HS woodshop class?

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Reading the Yeeee-Hah!!! thread, it got to wondering how my high school woodworking experience might differ from others. My impression was that our projects were relatively small compared to other schools, possibly due to overcrowding. We had "Industrial Arts" from grade 7 to 9, age 12 to 14. But anyway, two questions come to mind:
What did you make? What did your teacher make while you were occupied?
I got to make - candle holders (three pieces of wood, two holes) - lamp, styled like an old water pump - model rocket nose cones (our own individual design) - adjustable record rack (our own collective design) (That's it? Less than I thought after three years! Last year was wasted in a metal shop with a new teacher in a new school. Can't remember even lifting a single tool. Sigh.)
My teacher was making some double-helix carved lampstands. Very inspiring.
Maybe you can give me some age-appropriate ideas that my own children will like to try. So far my 13 year old has had NO formal shop instruction at school. But that's a separate thread.
- Owen -
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I had woodshop in Junior High. Constructed two end tables and one napkin holder. Instructor built a bed in his spare time. We were only allowed to operate the Delta 24" scroll saw. Instructor milled stock to size and cut dados. This was in the late 40's. Jim

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I made a small, 8 inch tall jewelry box fashioned after an upright piano, with a drawer in the knee area, keyboard, and a lift-off top, lined with felt. I won the coveted Golden Hammer Award, for outstanding student in carpentry, two years running. That was 36 years ago, and I'm looking at both on a nearby shelf right now. We built the first separate classroom on campus in this area that was not done by the county staff. Design was done in the drafting class, carpentry by the woodworking class, and wiring by the electrical class. I was fortunate enough to be in all three. The local area high schools here now build a house on the school grounds each year as a student project. It is then auctioned off to pay for the next one, and someone gets a house for a reasonable price. My son helped build two of them during high school. He is now an electronics engineering student in college. Go figure. Then again, I'm not a carpenter, either. <G>
RJ

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On Sun, 20 Feb 2005 09:36:43 -0500, Owen Lawrence wrote:

Jr High shop: step stool* and poorly executed turned black walnut bowl. Asked by instructor to make a new pattern for the sheetmetal scoop project. He was impressed with what I produced, which was nice to hear.
HS shop: group project making toboggans--ply deck, conduit runners, man that thing flew over snow and ice. Made hideously complex desk pigeonhole thing of my own design. Don't know what happened to it over the years.
*That pine stool got a lot of use in parents' house, got it back when swmboII came along. Took weeks in shop class. Whipped out a copy one day recently, cuz the old one was finally cracking to pieces. Guess I've learned something along the way.
Instructor spent his time making one of those lights that responds to music frequencies. Cutting edge, back then.
--
"Keep your ass behind you"
vladimir a t mad scientist com
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I made nothing. No shop in our school. Probably because it was before the iron age and the only tools we had was a rock.
My son made a box with a hinged lid. My grandson made a shelf with a curved pack and angle brackets. It is hanging in the downstairs hallway.
I took a four day course at a Woodcraft store and we made a CD shelf. It is a fairly simple design, but you had to: Select the wood joint plane layout cut curves on the bandsaw scrape and sand round over edges cut a tenon cut a dado fit everything with handplane and chisels drill and dowel one shelf
Ten people to a class and we learned basics of wood movement, sharpening tools, story sticks, safety, saw demos of tool use, etc. Instructor (or his assistant) did all the setups. Finishing was not done in class but some time was spent discussing various finishes.
I would think most high school students would be interesting in having a CD shelf or similar item. this was about 30 hours of class time but could be done in more or less depending on what the kids already know.
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Yep. The first semester was tools and material, culminating in a box, a bracket shelf and a spice rack, which I considered a reasonable analog of most furniture. Those who cared made box-jointed drawers, those who didn't made dadoed shelves.
HS made pretty much what they cared to, ranging from Armoire to Futon to - spice racks and chessboards. Grades included "degree of complexity" points.
I made time to help the kids. Some of them made time to help me keep the machines in repair and help in the little kid classes.
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We had both metal and wood class. Made a step stool, decorative three-tier wall shelf, wall organizer (key hooks, paper roll, letter holder), bud vase, lamp, small folding table. The bud vase and paper cutter on the organizer were made from Plexiglas (somehow plastics and woodworking can share many tools). In metal class I made a rotating baby-jar organizer which my father put in his shop.
wrote:

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This month, I've spent each Saturday with a bunch of Boy Scouts, who, for the most part, haven't had any shop class either. One of them, now 16, is working on an Eagle project.
We started a year ago January. The head woodchuck in our woodworker's club has an Alaska chainsaw mill. Someone from church had a goodsized (for suburban California) Western Red Cedar, that had to come down. Bill cut up the cedar into slabs, and the boys carried and stickered the wet slabs for drying.
A year later, we've got them built into two benches for the John Muir National Monument. These are vaguely based on a design from the Shaker Hancock village, which is in one of the major museums. The kids have learned what it takes to go from a big tree to a finished piece of outdoor furniture, and have something to donate as part of the process. Except for the BSA-precluded power tools, they built them themselves. Handsaws, chisels, mallets, and some big, honking Stanley planes, wherever possible.
I could have built a couple of benches between breakfast and lunch, if that's what it was about.
Shop never was really about building things, if done right. It was, and should be, about opening minds to creativity and capability. That's why Owen's questions brought back recollections many decades old. Mostly good ones, too. At least amongst those who 'got it'.
BTW, back in the 60's, I was a potter, at school. Carpentry, and masonry, I did with my dad, on weekends. Thrice blessed.
Patriarch
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Australopithecus scobis wrote:

Made a chess board out of walnut and maple (still have it, I'm 36 now). A Spice rack that my parents still use, and a wall rack that they still have in their basement!
When I was probably 10-12 yrs old, my dad was a VP for a lumber company. He used to bring home pine cutoffs and I'd build bird houses, all with hand tools. I remember sawing my ASS off. Back then I don't believe I ever heard of wood glue, as everything was held together with big nails!!
I also remember that my neighbor gave me a few shingles to put on one of the bird houses... Man, was I thrilled!
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This thread reminded me about a "safety" film shown in HS metal shop. A sliver of metal was driven to a man's eye by a machine cutting metal, the man was rushed to emergency and to the operating room where the metal was surgically removed (the embedded metal was aluminum, do a magnet was no use). The flick showed a close up of the operation, blood and all, and a boy in the class collapsed, hit his head on the work bench, and got a concussion. Needless to say, it did drive home the importance of wearing safety glasses with side shields. I guess hard hats should be recommended for safety films.
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Heh...we had a guy faint during a (not so bad) portion of a film in EMT class. He didn't finish the course, decided that blood and guts wasn't his idea of a good time. Nothing like going to a convention where they schedule "traumatic amputations" for right before lunch.
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Sadly, a lot of freshly minted EMTs leave the field early after a particularly gruesome event. Can't argue with their choice, but a lot of them could row the boat and let the other shoot the ducks.
We have a 12-year veteran on our squad who cannot stand vomit. Which is pretty much everywhere when you think about it. I just let her drive and make sure there's a towel (deflector) loaded after remaking the cot.
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Thing is, the rates of people quitting for that reason go _way_ down with a post-incident stress debriefing program. But, even with that, there are some that stick with you more than others, eh?

Heh. Maybe ten years ago, we had a guy with an upper-GI bleed. Crew capatain was interviewing him, I was the new guy so I was hauling equipment. Bill asked the patient a question, he turned to answer, and projectile-vomited full square into Bill's chest. Didn't miss a beat, kept up the interview, "...and how long have you been vomiting today?".
Puke, I don't mind so much. Grey matter just oogs me out, though.
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Only one more month until the snowmobilers quit contesting the right-of-way with (OBWW) maples. You learn quickly why they call them "brain buckets." Question I have is why didn't they use what they seem to have to drive with care?
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Mon, Feb 21, 2005, 6:38pm (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@noone.com (Phisherman) says: <snip> eye by a machine cutting metal, <snip> That happened to my dad, in the '40s or '50s. HE went to a doctor. He always claimed the doctor "froze" his eyeball, and then scraped the metal out. I can't say he was given to making up stories, so I guess it happened that way.
JOAT Intellectual brilliance is no guarantee against being dead wrong. - David Fasold
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On Sun, 20 Feb 2005 09:36:43 -0500, "Owen Lawrence"

=============I am now in my 60's and never took woodshop in High School BUT I was lucky enough to take woodshop in Junior High... (Grades 7 8 & 9)
The only thing I remember is some dumb kid ahaking the "can" of glue and dumping it on his own head...
However I did make my Mother a cutting board ...and she used it reliously over the years ...when she died I got it back and it now is "framed" and hung in my wives kitchen... (lol)... I can not cook worth a damn ..unfortunately I learned to hit a baseball in my youth I should have learned how to cook)
Anyway I do have to thank you for bring back some memories of my mother... and I had a good laugh remembering the look on that kids face after he dumped that glue on his head....
Bob Griffiths
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This just like your cars... can't have enough wives either?
--
Owen Lowe
The Fly-by-Night Copper Company
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The high school I went to had 2 carpentry classes. One was for woodworking (grades 10&12) and the other was more for home building (11&12).
Some projects I got to make in the woodworking shop were:
3 drawer jewlery box 6 in high step stool Router table Some clocks And we did somethings for the school itself
In the Home building shop:
We got to build a scaled down (but almost full scale) model of a house. Get this it was big enough to fit in the shop.
And in my 12th grade year we contacted by a local fire company and built a Fire Saftey House. They could take to local elementry schools. That was probably my best project I ever worked on.
Bill
On Sun, 20 Feb 2005 09:36:43 -0500, "Owen Lawrence"

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Sun, Feb 20, 2005, 9:36am snipped-for-privacy@iosphere.net (OwenLawrence) claims: <snip> We had "Industrial Arts" from grade 7 to 9, age 12 to 14. <snip> We had SHOP, period. None of this pansy "industrial arts" stuff. Tood shop from grade 4, it was mandatory, up thru grade 12, stopped bing mandatory at grade 9, I believe. Shop covered everything, woodworking, metal working, welding, automotive, all the fun things.
I still have a welded magazine rack, from maybe grade 11-12. And, a solid cherry bookcase, designed, and made by me in grade 10, I believe it was.
Started out in grade 4 with a wall hanging plant holder. Neat lille thing made of wood to hang on the wall, and the "pot" it self, was made from a motor oil can, cut, and soldered. Pretty basic then, apparently pretty advanced now. All hand tools until grade 10, as I recall. Ah yes, we also had the use of a forge, from about grade 7 or 8. Made a cold chisel with that, should still have that too, it was/is as good, or better, than any you can buy.
I remember sanding the tip of a finger or two off, in about grade 8 or 9. "Everyone", including my parents, put it down to carelessness on my part. Which it was. Lesson learned? Don't do that again, and I haven't. The shop teacher also demonstrated kickback on the table saw, when I was in grade 9 (that's we moved into the new school, and had a saw available). He said, don't do that, and stand out of the way, just in case. I listened, and no kickback, and stand out of the way, just in case. Then he proceeded to turn us loose, and went in his office, and smoked his pipe. We survived nicely.
Back then it was considered that if you did something stupid, it was your own fault if you got hurt, especially if you had already been told not to do it. Nowadays, it seems to be the norm to put the blame on someone else for your own stupidity, regardless of how many times you've been told not to do it.
JOAT Intellectual brilliance is no guarantee against being dead wrong. - David Fasold
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(Owen Lawrence) claims: <snip> We had "Industrial Arts" from grade 7 to 9, age 12 to 14. <snip>

Was it a 4-mile walk to school? Uphill both ways?
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