What material for woden screws

I want to make some wooden screws (threaded rod) for several projects and would like some input from anybody that has done this on what material you used.
What is the preferred wood to make these from? I have one in a shop stool I made but it tends to warp slightly depending on the humidity.
Would it be better to use a single straight grained piece or turn the dowel from glued up stock to reduce the tendency to warp?
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BRuce

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Hi Bruce,
Ideally, you want a very close-grained and dense wood for thread-cutting, for example Box. A glued-up blank might make it a bit more stable if it's going to live in an environment with large RH changes, but otherwise well-seasoned straight-grained stuff will do fine.
Cheers,
Frank
<BRuce> wrote in message

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On Sun, 07 Mar 2004 08:47:32 -0500, BRuce <BRuce> wrote:

How big ? What pitch of thread ? How much force ?

For small stuff, box is good. Applewood and other slow-growing fruitwoods are excellent, if you can find a piece big enough. Ivy is another good one, if you can find it. Even holly might be worth trying. For big ones (like vice screws), it depends on your local availability. Beech is pretty good (my local choice) but I'd guess hickory is worth a look too. The right hard grade of maple is another good choice.
Lignum vitae is very good, especially for nuts. It's strong, wears well and is self-lubricating. It's also endangered and unavailable - however sacrificing an old mallet to make the nut for a new workbench or cider press isn't unreasonable.
Ash and oak are poor choices. Oak tends to be brittle, ash wears quickly.
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Smert' spamionam

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Isn't hickory prone to chipout or tearout?
Andy Dingley wrote:

mostly 3/4", whatever the "standard box cutter pitch is, assume moderate.

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BRuce

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On Sun, 07 Mar 2004 08:47:32 -0500, BRuce <BRuce> wrote:

hard maple.
cut it slightly oversize, let it sit for a while, joint it straight, let it sit for a while, check it, let it sit for a while....
then cut the threads
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Hey Bruce,
I've had to make threaded dowel and matching nuts in a lot of different species and sizes, haven't had any comebacks. As long as the stock is dry, stable and straight grained, you shouldn't have a problem.
Lee Valley sells an american made jig, for threading and tapping...works great after some trial and error.
Cheers,
aw
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