What Layout and Measuring Tools?

Page 1 of 2  

What are the essential layout and measuring tools for the woodworking shop? Which ones are the most needed and which ones are the nice to have?
Philly
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Philly (in XigHf.192$0s.99@trndny04) said:
| What are the essential layout and measuring tools for the | woodworking shop? Which ones are the most needed and which ones are | the nice to have?
Depends on what's being made. Since you didn't specify "minimalist" or "low-budget", I'll suggest as essential:
Combination square with protractor head Trammel points Long straightedge Knife
Nice to have:
Sharp pencil Tape rule Framing square Drywall square (mine is square and straight) Compass and dividers 1-2-3 Block Digital depth gauge Digital calipers Saddle square
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Morris Dovey wrote:

dial protractor. :)
er
--
email not valid


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Morris Dovey wrote:

I would add a dial caliper with fractions clearly marked ( saw one at Lowes in the $20.00 range), great for planing and checking thickness. Maybe then a 3' straight edge. The perfect size for most cabinet work when you are building bases. OH!! and a folding ruler! The extension slider will measure inside-to-inside and keep your measurement if you just want to trace it direct.Nice for adding shelves to cases.
Tom in KY, addicted and over-run with the tool habit.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Morris Dovey (in hihHf.77$ snipped-for-privacy@news.uswest.net) said:
| Philly (in XigHf.192$0s.99@trndny04) said: | || What are the essential layout and measuring tools for the || woodworking shop? Which ones are the most needed and which ones are || the nice to have? | | Depends on what's being made. Since you didn't specify "minimalist" | or "low-budget", I'll suggest as essential: | | Combination square with protractor head | Trammel points | Long straightedge | Knife | | Nice to have: | | Sharp pencil | Tape rule | Framing square | Drywall square (mine is square and straight) | Compass and dividers | 1-2-3 Block | Digital depth gauge | Digital calipers | Saddle square
Another entry in the "nice to have" catagory: A "SmartLevel" with both 24" and 48" bodies. I like this measuring tool because it's been far better than a bubble-type level for repeatability with poor eyesight and it provides direct angular readings in addition to vertical and horizontal. It has some "gee-whiz" features like "beep" at horizontal and vertical, "hold" current reading, and a display that automatically flips when the level is used upside down. The digital display shows angles to a tenth of a degree. I also have a short magnetic frame that makes some machine setups a snap - and I've bought the 48" padded carrying case to protect it when I take it out of the shop. At almost $90 it isn't cheap; but I think it's been worth every penny.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
said:

Nice list Morris. In addition to Morris's list I would include:
Chalk - I use chalk all the time. I put chalk marks on would to be joined. When all the chalk is gone the face is flat. I also use it in place of a pencil when I can. It is a lot easier to get rid of than pencil marks.
Drafting Pencil - I use it in place of a marking knife in many situations.
6" Rule - I always have my favorite 6" rule with me in the shop. I find it easier to position than a 12".
Center Finding Ruler
Good Lighting - I am getting older and need good light to accurately measure and layout
1/4" Graph paper - I keep a pad on the bench. I find it easier to figure out design details by doing a quick drawing.
Only One Tape Measure - I used to keep a bunch of tapes around so there was always one close but I found out the hard way that they each had their own measurement system. Now I keep only one tape and make sure that all machines are referenced to it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Frank Drackman wrote: [schnible]

Chalk or talcum powder? Chalk is abrasive on tool edges, I think.
[more good ideas, snipped]
er
--
email not valid

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

So is wood, I think..

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
stoutman wrote:

And sand embedded in the wood. So I've heard.
er
--
email not valid

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Depends on the wood. Maple, beech, or cherry, yes. Red oak, hell no. Did that exactly once. Wound up spending an hour and a half with a dental explorer, picking chalk out of the pores, before applying finish; even the 1.5HP dust collector wouldn't get it all.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I never thought of the open pore problem. Did you try a wet sponge? Almost 100% of the hardwood that I use is cherry & maple so I never had a problem. I can honestly say that I learned something today.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tape measure Digital caliper speed square
--
Stoutman
http://www.garagewoodworks.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 07:24:39 +0000, Philly opined:

+ Combination square of good manufacture. Empire or Johnson top-of-the-line is the lowest you want to go. Skip the protractor head and center finder. Oooh, listen: you can hear the distant chanting of the villagers: "Star-rett, Star-rett..."
+ Plastic school protractor (local grocer's)
+ Good quality framer's square
+ Good quality pencils. You might consider B or 2B instead of the ubiquitous #2/HB.
You can cobble up center-finders, scratch awls (rub a 16d nail on the sidewalk), marking knives, trammels, and the like as you need them. Once you've made a device, you'll know what you want to look for in a store-bought version. Then, and only then, go nuts with a Lee Valley catalog.
Nice: ++ Mortise gauge ++ Long metal straightedge ++ Wing dividers with fine adjustment screw ++ HD compass and trammels
If you do your own designs, you might look at French curves and a better protractor. Add a T-square and drafting board, or CAD software if you're so inclined.
IMHO, the other guys are messing with your head. ;-)
The most important layout and measuring devices are your own eyes, brain, and hands. Understand when and where you need the precision of a carpenter's pencil, a mechanical pencil, a scratch awl, and a marking knife. Have fun.
--
"Keep your ass behind you"
wreck20051219 at spambob.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You don't use a tape measure?? Geesh, I must be living in the dark ages.
--
Stoutman
http://www.garagewoodworks.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 18:04:30 +0000, opined:

Nah, I just don't make things that are big enough to need one. Good idea to add one to OP's list. So, OP, get a tape measure. Bright fluorescent!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Australopithecus scobis wrote:

Struth. I said dial protractor, but I laid it up against angles measured and cut using my simple protractor, and there was only 5 minutes or less divergence from the desired angle.
But it looks very nice.
er
--
email not valid

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 07:24:39 GMT, "Philly"

My most used, so I'd call them my most essential: - 6" Starrett combo square - 16' tape measure (I like my Fast Cap "story pole" flat tape) - Lee Valley Saddle square (just get one) - Cheap, really basic, brass thickness calipers (no dial, Garrett Wade?) - Marking knife (Veritas striking is my favorite, XActo #1works - great with no sharpening & is cheap) - GOOD Bevel gage - Pencils (#1, 2, & 3, + red green & blue) - Sharpie - Crayons (jointed edge & direction marks) - Chalk (rough part layout) - 3' steel ruler - Old Starrett dividers ($5 at a flea market) - Lee Valley clip on pencil sharpener - Plastic protractor & 30/60/90 & 45/45/90 triangles from Staples - shop made flex bow for forming curves - large framing square - string
Stuff I got along without for years, but wouldn't let go now, including stuff for specific tasks: - 3' Machinist's Reference Straight Edge (the one you keep in the box unless checking machines) - more GOOD bevel gages in various sizes (once they're set...) - 12" Starrett combo (I actually bought this before the 6", the 6" is more useful to me) - 4" double square (you can never have too many preset measurements) - Bevel Boss or Lee Valley angle finder / setter - Veritas fractional / decimal dial caliper - Veritas drawing bow - Veritas measuring stick heads (for checking diagonals) - 6, 12, & 24" steel rules - 6' straight edge - Assorted Stabila levels - Starrett angle finder (used in finish / installation work only - mechanic's feeler gages - marking awl - drilling awl - center punch - GOOD marking / cutting gages - chalk line - compass & beam compass heads - plastic french curve - profile gage
Stuff I've used maybe once, and need to put on eBay, real wastes of money for me: - aluminum saddle dovetail markers - Cheap combo squares - Home center bevel gages - Starrett protractor head (Bevel Boss & gage MUCH better!) - 45 deg saddle square - Crappy marking & cutting gages - Center finding rulers (it's easier for me to do the math than to go get the other ruler <G>) - feet/inch calculator ( a $3 solar jobbie is just as easy for me) Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In addition to the above responses I would add:
Must Have: A high-quality 6 in. steel rule (is probably the most-used tool in my entire shop).
Very Nice to Have: A pair of sliding sticks (I'm not sure of proper name for this) with a little clamp that lets you move the sticks to mark a given length. Gives you an exact and precise indicator of a length without having to measure and record. Also lets you get the length of all kinds to places that are difficult/impossible to measure with a tape or rule, e.g. inside of drawer spaces in a cabinet or inside diagonals of a drawer or cabinet. You buy the pair of clamps from a woodworking supplier (e.g. Rockler) and cut the wood strips yourself. The clamps can be used for any length of wood, so you can have multiple sets of sticks to easily mark different length ranges. .
--Billy

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A T-square is pretty handy. The sample at the http://www.patwarner.com/t_square.html link has a lot of application.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you're going to do traditional joinery get a Tite-Mark marking gauge - with the accessory pair of mortise and tenon cutting wheels. Does what it's supposed to do better and easier than anything out there.
charlie b
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.