What kind of saw would you use?

My parents recently bought a new electric range for their condo, which is 30" wide. Unfortunately, the old range was a drop-in, so the gap between the cabinets is only about 29" wide. So, to make the new range fit, I will need to cut back the formica countertops and the vertical wooden trim boards. What kind of saw would you use on this job?
My thoughts:
1. Sawzall - much too brutal 2. 7 1/4" circular saw - will cause too much chip-out and I won't be able to get close to the edges 3. Jigsaw - best bet, but line may be a bit wiggly 4. As-yet-unpurchased mini circular saw (5") - same issues as #2? 5. handsaw - I get tired just thinking about it. After all, electrons are our friends.
The countertops and cabinetry are all sub-beautiful,so basically I'm looking for the best way to make a clean straight cut without a whole lot of agony.
Thanks!
Kevin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article <764e082b-f2da-4499-afe1-5e7da10f40e3

I'm tempted to say measure before you buy, but really I think you want to take it back and buy one that fits.
S.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 26 Mar 2008 12:47:10 -0700 (PDT), Kevin

I guess you've checked and determined that you can't move one of the cabinets an inch. Maybe to much offset to the hood?
You can cut the trim face frame piece with a circular saw with a guide clamped on. I just did one, came out fine. They were walnut stained, and I just flat blacked the cut face which is not seen because of the range projection.
If the counters are not too long and don't turn to an L, take them off, take them to a countertop place and get them to trim them for you. Usually just a few screws in the corner gussets holding them on.
Frank
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

ZZzactly. Cut the OTHER>>> end.
Another choice is the 'down-cut' saw blades. Cuts laminate nice and clean, but hang onto the saw...it want to ride upwards..push down on it with authority when attempting a cut with those kinda blades. They are specifically designed to cut laminate in that fashion. Leaves a beautiful edge.... go slow and steady against a straight edge. Finish off the piece you can't cut with a Fein MultiMaster...now THERE's an excuse to buy a wonderful tool.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You know, they have just started the TV informercials on them again. It looks mighty tempting. They show a room that is in shambles.
Then after purchasing the Fein tool, they show what has happened to the room after they got started with that tool. Incredible. You wouldn't recognize the room from the before and after pics.
Apparently it paints, stains, lays flooring, installs carpet, does interior decorating (planning maybe? can't see it as a shopping aid) and improves the lighting in the room. Not to mention the fact that it cuts really long flat miters on fireplace mantles as well as trim miters accurately and with ease. I think it may install windows as well.
I know that tool is indispensable for some things, but I never knew it was so versatile.
I was thinking Festool stuff... but I don't know now...
Damn you late night TV!
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Router with a straight bit running along a guide edge. The router won't be able to get right into the back corners, but you can cut that part a little wide with a hand saw and then trim it off with a razor knife.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

Exactly. That's the way to go. If you don't have a router, you could use the jig saw with a smooth cutting blade and a guide edge. G O V E R Y S L O W. In this case patience (which I have very little of) is a virtue.
--
NewsProxy used here. Crossposters
and multiple addressees blocked.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Also before cutting with the jigsaw, score the Formica with the sharp edge of a knife. Another method is to run a piece of duct tape or something like that down the middle of the cut line which will minimize chipping, cut a little wide with the jigsaw, then trim the edge with a razor knife.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

Yet another little trick is to heat the formica with a hair dryer before you cut it. But, I don't recommend this one for the novice.
--
NewsProxy used here. Crossposters
and multiple addressees blocked.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mar 26, 5:01pm, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Ross Hebeisen) wrote:

With Forrest ATB thin kerf chain.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

jig saw. Went through a bunch of blades, Smoothed the edges with a file and a utility knife,
It wasn't perfect, but it worked.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The above ideas look good for cutting. But have you considered a small corner molding to hide the end of the counter? Thin Plastic in a matching/contrasting color? Maybe a nice wood, properly finished?? If you find something, you could use the chain saw (electric, of course) for the cut.
Hope this helps.....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
http://www.woodworkingtips.com/etips/etip022500wb.html
Kevin wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

LMAO... there's some burning memories...
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.