What is worng with Rust-Oleum

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I have tried to use Rust-Oleum for smaller projects, instead of dragging out the compressor, gun, mixing, etc. With the current project (metal) using Rust-Oleum I think it might be the last.
I just cannot understand why it takes so long to dry. I am following all the proper procedures, not too thick, proper cleaning, proper spray application, under 40% humidity and over 70 degrees, etc...etc. In my testing the 24 hours should be dry to touch and should only be handled 48 hours after application. I think it takes at least a week before it is fully cured. Any wetsanding should be done after 48 hours.
PLUS the added time, greatly increases the finish, by allowing dust to settle onto the finish. It also is just a waste of time.
With that said, what are the alternatives? Is longer dry time of Rust-Oleum really a benefit? Can the spray paints that dry in a few minutes really compare? I would think these days that to be true. Car paint is dry in minutes so why am I waiting on Rust-Oleum to dry?
Comments appreciated.
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Just in case, thin coats means not thick enough to cover the surface. You want to build the finish in 4 or 5 coats minimum. Otherwise, I have not had a problem with Rust-Oleum spray products. Are you shaking the can up sufficiently?
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Hi Chris,
A few weeks ago, we stripped some metal lawn chairs that date back at least to the 60's - they sat on the porch on the house were I grew up.
Anyway, they must have had 10 coats of glopped on paint (some of which, I probably am responsible for). Used that "peel-away" stripper - kind of messy but did the job.
After sanding, pressure washing, drying and sanding, we primed with Rust-Oleum primer and then within about 20 minutes, sprayed several light coats of Rust-Oleum finish about 30 min apart. These were pretty much tack-free after the 30 minutes. After 48 hours, I wiped them down with 0000 steel wool and sprayed a few more light coats.
Most of this was done in our garage when the humidity was very high and uncomfortable. After another 48 hours, they hardened up nicely and were sittable.
Just my experience.
Lou
wrote:

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Chris wrote:

Don't know why you have to wait so long. I just checked 3 cans of Rustoleum oil enamel (white, aluminum, and rust red primer) and they said dry to touch in 2-4 hours handle in 5-9 hours and completely dry to recoat in 24 hours. In my experience the white actually was dry to the touch in less than 2 hours, the primer dried to the touch in 1/2 hour.
What the hell, hasn't anyone heard of dryers? If you are having trouble drying an oil product, put some dryer in it. Gees, go out right now and buy some dryer. DO IT. Lowes has it the last time I checked, but any paint store should have it.
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out
using
all
48
Rust-Oleum
Kinda of hard to add a dryer to spray paint.
I should mention that I am using the Appliance Epoxy line of paint. When I get it to work, it does have a real nice finish to it. After about 4 days it is real hard.
Just looked at the drying time on the label, same as the normal paints that was listed above. I just noticed that the new cans (different batch), that I used today are yielding better results.
Yep shaking the can. I normally count to 60 seconds. Thanks to me forgetting my place or getting distracted that normally turns into a real 120 seconds.
Even with the better results that I am getting now, is the extra drying time really an advantage? What about the 12 to 15 minute dry time paints. Anyone have anything to compare to Rust-Oleum?
Chris
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Chris wrote:

Can't compare w/ that specific line but never had any problem w/ the standard RustOleum products. I can only think you're spraying much too thick an individual coat.
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Chris wrote:

Sorry, just had my head elsewhere. Some how I didn't see that you were using spray cans.
As for fast dry, Krylon has always produced a good job for me. But good hiding usually takes several thin coats. Something else that you may want to try is a paint store that mixes and matches car paints and puts them into aerosol cans. They can make enamel which dries slower or lacquer (fast dry). Lacquer is also harder (think two tone cars with hard tops in the 60's) but it also chips easier than enamel.
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Me too. That first paragraph did not register very well in the brain.
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wrote in message

Sorry folks if I caused any confusion. No harm intended.
--
Chris

If you can read this, thank a teacher. If it is in English, thank a
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Chris wrote:

No need for apologies. It was clear to me you were spraying. I think the others were skimming your post too quickly.
Dave
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That makes a *big* difference.

"more is better" as far as shaking time goes. start timing _after_ the ball is moving _freely_.

There _is_ a fairly direct correlation between longer drying times and the hardness/ durability of the finished surface. Within the same type of paint/finish, that is.
"Appliance Epoxy" does tend to "feel" tacky for a while -after- it is dry to the point of being safely handled.
Close reading of the spray can indicates it takes a _week_ for the finish to fully cure. See the notes about re-coating.
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George E. Cawthon wrote:

George, is there a hidden port on a spray can for adding driers? :)
dave
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The OP was unclear (to me anyway) as to whether he was using a spay can or mixing the paint in his own sprayer. In that case, additives are easily added. Rustoleum can be bought in gallons and quarts also.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

It's very clear that that OP was discussing spray cans. Re-read his post and you'll see.
dave
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Chris (in %uLSe.23594$ snipped-for-privacy@fe02.lga) said:
| I have tried to use Rust-Oleum for smaller projects, instead of | dragging out the compressor, gun, mixing, etc. With the current | project (metal) using Rust-Oleum I think it might be the last. | | I just cannot understand why it takes so long to dry. I am | following all the proper procedures, not too thick, proper | cleaning, proper spray application, under 40% humidity and over 70 | degrees, etc...etc. In my testing the 24 hours should be dry to | touch and should only be handled 48 hours after application. I | think it takes at least a week before it is fully cured. Any | wetsanding should be done after 48 hours. | | PLUS the added time, greatly increases the finish, by allowing dust | to settle onto the finish. It also is just a waste of time. | | With that said, what are the alternatives? Is longer dry time of | Rust-Oleum really a benefit? Can the spray paints that dry in a | few minutes really compare? I would think these days that to be | true. Car paint is dry in minutes so why am I waiting on | Rust-Oleum to dry? | | Comments appreciated.
I've done a bit of experimenting with Rust-Oleum and discovered that there is considerable variation from product to product (by which I mean the numeric product code on the can) and even between aerosol and non-aerosol varieties of the same product.
I've used one of their aerosol flat black products in solar panel production with good success - and have had terrible results with all of the non-aerosol version and all of their other flat black products used. It looks a lot like the company hasn't managed to set up any internal product standards. The stuff I've been using is generally dry to the touch in ten minutes or so.
The guys in the aircraft shop next door (who use primarily high-gloss paints) seem to stick with the Krylon product line and say that it produces more consistant results - although they sometimes experience problems with the current coat disolving pinholes in an underlying coat.
I suppose you just need to do a little testing on scrap or hidden area to determine suitability of each paint you try.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html
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Update.
Well it seems that the new batch of two spray cans seems to be acting as normal. Might of been a bad batch??? Not sure, but it seems to be behaving.
With this bad batch in mind. What is the advantage of the slow dry time as compared to the competions 12 minute dry time?
Thanks, Chris
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Chris (in 4BPSe.23788$ snipped-for-privacy@fe02.lga) said:
| Well it seems that the new batch of two spray cans seems to be | acting as normal. Might of been a bad batch??? Not sure, but it | seems to be behaving. | | With this bad batch in mind. What is the advantage of the slow dry | time as compared to the competions 12 minute dry time?
I dunno. My wild guess is that the longer-drying paint may provide more leveling of the painted surface (smoother finish).
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html
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On Mon, 05 Sep 2005 00:12:28 -0400, Chris wrote:

My information, from generally unreliable sources, is that Rustoleum uses fish oil which intentionally dries very slowly. Once the oils in a paint dry up, the rust protection barrier is gone.
That said, what sort of wood are you concerend about protecting from rust?
If you're not concerned about rust, RUSToleum might be the wrong product Specifically, metal does not move as much as wood (in response to moisture ... heat moves them both somewhat) and does not need as flexible of a coating as wood.
See Bob Flexners book about finishing. I just got it last week and found LOTS of new (to me) information about finishes.
Bill
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Bill, Actually it is a big huge Bridgeport mill that I am restoring. Even then rust is not really a concern, nor was my reasoning for the selection of Rust-Oleum. I picked it because of the finish and performance.
I am thinking about switching to the Krylon next time around. I did grab some and used it on a test piece. Primer than the finish coat. Very hard, very fast. Gets my vote next time around. I am stuck using the Rust-Oleum on the mill, as I am "piece painting" it and cannot change mid stream.
The drying time, for me at least, is allowing dust and containments to settle onto the finish while it is drying. Currently I am wet sanding than applying what I hope to be the final coat before I leave the shop, in an attempt to keep the dust down.
I have been using a very lite coat as possible, and have feel victim a coupe of times of trying to spray on thicker coats in an attempt to overcome the drying time.
Either way, when I do get a dust free coat on, it is a real nice finish. Just wish the process would go quicker.
Plus I think the Rust-Oluem comes out a little too fast or thick. Works fine on larger areas, but getting into tight spots, it does cause a problem. The Krylon, does seem to come out at a more reasonable rate, at least IMHO.
--
Chris

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A totally different tangent here, Rust-Oleum plant in Evanston (which now houses a Home Depot) site has had a few problems. HD built there and had to then shut a part of the store to drill and drive pilings to keep it from sinking. Recently in the parking lot area a Steak and Shake was being built a friend drove by on a way to see a client. She had grown up out west and has fond memories the restaurant. On here way home from the meeting she saw the place which had been very near completion fallen over like a house of cards.
The moral of this little story...... there really is not one.
Mark
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