What is the right glue for T-track

I am in process of making a large sled (8' x 3') for tablesaw. There I routed (3/4" wide and 3/8" deep) slots for 6 t-tracks. For the first two, I did use epoxy, but the mixing was messy and it was not convinient to apply. For the last four, I did try polyurethane - even after reading the instructions that it will expand when curing. I was thinking that the extra pressure would be just good for a tighter grip.
To my surprise, the tight seams started to foam after 60 minutes from gluing and screwing. The polyurethane was easy to apply, but I am not sure how strong the bond will be. The epoxy should be ok.
I was even considering to use Titebond II or III for that purpose. My conceren there is that the glue needs air to cure and it is not given that Titebond will stick in the glue grooves of the t-track.
What are your experiences with - Epoxy - Polyurethane - Titebond - Gorilla - others
Recommendations?
Cheers, Ollie
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On Sun, 30 Jan 2005 18:43:52 -0500, "Ollie" <Olivili at Hot Mail dot com> wrote:>Recommendations?
Gorilla is another polyurethane.
Even though epoxy has to be mixed, I've got a lot of experience with it (read as "I HAVE SOME IN THE SHOP" <G>), so it's what I'd probably use.
I'd actually use screws instead of any adhesive, if possible.
I wouldn't get too worried about the Poly-U, as I've built several giant scale model aircraft using it for dissimilar surfaces, it held up[ very well. The planes are subject to some interesting stresses, and vibrations, and the Poly-U never failed.
Barry
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Only one real choice, epoxy. It is not the most convenient or easiest, but is the best bond for this type application. Tape over the screw holes and with a good tight dado you just need a THIN layer of epoxy in the dado. Clamp securely, and I personally put the screws in AFTER the epoxy has cured In fact, a squirt of epoxy between the screw holes probably is all you need. If you over do the epoxy, be sure to wipe up any squeeze out and DON'T let it get into the t-track itself - it is a real PITA to get out and if you don't you will have places where the bolt head will NOT traverse
Polyurethane and Gorilla are the same basic type - no real difference other than brand names and prices. TiteBond is NOT going to do well as to adhering to aluminum Not the worst choice for this application, but epoxy will be stronger.
Hide glue, forget it.
John On Sun, 30 Jan 2005 18:43:52 -0500, "Ollie" <Olivili at Hot Mail dot com> wrote:>I am in process of making a large sled (8' x 3') for tablesaw. There I

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When gluing metal it is important to ensure the surface is clean and free of residue. Ideally the surface has been slightly roughened to aid in the glue adhering. Perfectly smooth aluminium can be hard to achieve a good bond.
The epoxy should work. Polyurethane is the same as Gorilla glue. The reason this foams is the moisture in the wood. This should also work, but you need to ensure the track is clamped down along the length, otherwise you will find an unpleasant bow due to the expansion.
I would not expect Titebond to work for metal. It does not really bond and when the metal contracts in cold could break free.
I expect adhesive caulk would work also fine without expansion pressures.
I have also recently purchased the new hot melt glue HiPerformer or some similar name. Works well as long as you do not need a long working time. It is also expensire.
Dave Paine.
"Ollie" <Olivili at Hot Mail dot com> wrote in message

I
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gluing
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"Ollie" <Olivili at Hot Mail dot com> wrote in message

Someone recommended Liquid nails to me and I used it on the miter track on my router table. It's been about 2 years I guess and it's still holding. I use feather boards that expand in the miter, so it does get use.
Kevin in Bakersfield
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Kevin,
There are quite a many variants of Liquid Nails and Perfect Glue. Which type you have been using?
Do you know what are the main ingredient in the glue? Is there a tight bond between aluminum and plywood?
Cheers, Ollie

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"Ollie" <Olivili at Hot Mail dot com> wrote in message

I just found the container behind some shelves in the storage shed about two weeks ago and threw it away because it's so old. I have to go by the borg tomorrow, I'll find it and let you know what it was. It's in a brownish gold tube.
As far as holding strength, the track is Liquid Nailed and screwed and I can't really say much other than it doesn't budge. I was thinking about it after I replied, and I might have read about the Liquid Nails for miter trace in one of the many router books I have, they all have the obligatory "build your own router table" chapter.
Kevin in Bakersfield
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"Ollie" <Olivili at Hot Mail dot com> wrote in message

Ollie, I think I used the Project type: http://www.liquidnails.com/adhesives/ln-601.html I see they have a Steel and Metal Frame type that is recommended for Steel and Aluminum to wood surfaces http://www.liquidnails.com/adhesives/ln-925.html
Kevin in Bakersfield
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Kevin,
Those two look like they are intended for construction projects. Perhaps I could try them in my furniture projects based on your positive experience.
Cheers, Ollie

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I used polyurethane on mine (Gorilla) and it seems to be holding just fine.

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