What is the proper term for chemicals used to color wood via chemical reaction

ISTR that there is a word for the chemicals used to artificially age or color wood via a chemical reaction. Examples would be sodium hydroxide, iron acetate, potassium dichromate, or nitric acid.
This is distinct from coloring wood with dyes or stains or toning it with colored clear finishes.
Does anybody know what the proper term is for the technique or the chemicals used?
--
FF

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/4/2011 12:43 PM, Fred the Red Shirt wrote:

Fuming
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Now now, don't get angry...
OK, just kidding. That's what you call it when you use ammonia vapor, but not when you apply the chemical in aqueous solution, right?
--
FF


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/4/2011 2:03 PM, Fred the Red Shirt wrote:

Ooooh yeah.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
One word that would apply to sodium hydroxide and nitric acid when in contact with organic materials is that they act as 'denaturants.' They alter the structure of proteins, a process called denaturation. A drop of nitric acid will produce yellowish brown stains on skin.
As to the other chemicals, I don't know if the same thing applies. I seem to remember potassium dichromate had a strong orange color, but I think you're looking for effects produced through a chemical reactions.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Fred the Red Shirt" wrote in message wrote:

Now now, don't get angry...
OK, just kidding. That's what you call it when you use ammonia vapor, but not when you apply the chemical in aqueous solution, right? ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Correct, direct application is not fuming. I don't remember what he called it but David Marks once used this on one of his shows. I believe that potassium dichromate was what he used.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/5/2011 12:58 PM, CW wrote:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I was thinking aback about DM also but I thought he was using the chemicals on metal surfaces rather than wood.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Leon" wrote in message wrote:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I was thinking aback about DM also but I thought he was using the chemicals on metal surfaces rather than wood. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I remember the metal piece but I thought that he also did one with wood. Could be wrong. Long time ago.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There is no one word that characterizes the use of "chemicals" to color wood. Since they react with the wood itself, unlike a pigment or dye, perhaps "reactives" might be a good shorthand. Fuming is specific to ammonia. Acids like nitric and sulfuric as well as things like potassium permanganate are all oxidants. They color the wood by oxidizing the wood components. Dichromate both oxidizes and dyes the wood. Think of oxidants acting as a very controlled "burn".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article

I think the term is "distressing", which also covers deliberatly damaging furniture to make it look old or antique.

--
Stuart Winsor

Only plain text for emails
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 05 Nov 2011 22:39:45 +0000 (GMT), Stuart

That's called "Minwaxing" here. <titter>
-- Life is an escalator: You can move forward or backward; you can not remain still. -- Patricia Russell-McCloud
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RE: Your sig.
Yes, I can remain still on an escalator for quite some time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Or any finishing using polyurethane.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.