What is the best way to remove sawdust before finishing?

Page 1 of 2  

I have a project that I have just finished sanding. What is the best way to remove the sawdust before finishing it? I seem to remeber reading something recently to stay away from tack cloths as they leave a residue?
Thanks.
Stacey
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I NEVER use tack cloths any longer. A good shop vac with a round brush attachment (I wrap tape around the brush to stiffen them) is what I use. Sometimes I also blow out the pores with a heavy blast of compressed air (with the doors open with cross ventilation so the dust goes bye-bye), followed by the aforementioned vacuum treatment. I use fast drying finishes and have no trouble with dust. Cloths can leave bits of lint. Tack cloths can mess up your finish.
Dave
Stacey wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Compressed air from a tank isn't such a good idea. Lubircating oil, and moisture can be sprayed onto your project, and that will definately stain wood, or screw up finishes. Go with dave's aforementioned vacuum treatment.
SCB.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Good point; you have to spray ONLY clean air!
Dave
SatansCabanaBoy wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Is it true this is less of a problem (or no problem) with oiless compressors? Is there a reliable, inexpensive way to filter otherwise?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I do it with an oiless. Yes, there are filters available if you have oil in the air. This is more important with older compressors as the rings wear. It is also a method I use only if the weather is warm enough to do it outside. In the shop you just blow a lot of air and stir up more dust.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 30 May 2005 03:51:00 GMT, the inscrutable "Fourleaves"

Harbor Freight has filter/regulator sets on sale for $20 quite often. Grab one of those and your compressor will be set for life.
I blow off any sanding dust (or, more often, scraping curlies) then wipe down the surface with denatured alcohol or lacquer thinner. Within minutes, I'm putting finish on. Since I like wiping varnishes and satin finishes, dust isn't as large a problem for me as it is with those who like those glaring pinanner finishes.
P.S: Please learn to bottom-post.
--
If you turn the United States on its side,
everything loose will fall to California.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
toller wrote:

follered along aftuh th' hahpsicoed ...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
    Greetings and salutations...

    Regards     Dave Mundt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 30 May 2005 15:15:06 GMT, the inscrutable "toller"

Yeah, you know: Grand pinanners, upright pinanners, player pinanners, tons of coats of hand-rubbed black lacquer finishes on any kind of pinanner.
P.S: If you still don't grok it, think "piano", silly.
--
If you turn the United States on its side,
everything loose will fall to California.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I use a filter at the end of the line just ahead of the gun/nozzle with an oiled compressor.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
With oil, I don't bother. It just doesn't seem to make any difference.
With varnish, I use a cloth dampened with mineral spirits.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&cat=1,310&pH431 http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&cat=1,310&pE784 http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&cat=1,310&pF266 http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&cat=1,310&p2669 My choice: http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&cat=1,310&p2635 A scraping blade must be burnished: http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&cat=1,310&pA070 Handheld blades: http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&cat=1,310&pA069
Scraping is an aquired art to a degree, especially in conditioning the blade. But it leaves wood very very smooth.
--
Alex - newbie_neander in woodworking
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I like compressed air and/or the same solvent as the first finish coat, except water. Water raises the grain. My most often prefinish wipe-down is done with mineral sprits.
If I'm staining, I often don't get crazy about removing dust, as the washcoat, stain, barrier, and clear coats will get light rubs between coats. A blast of air is fine. Oiling is even easier, as the wiping of the oil removes dust.
I've had no problems with store bought tack cloths used to wipe dust from between-coat scuffing of varnish, shellac, and lacquer.
I don't use a lot of water base finishes, but others here do. They can comment on tack cloths and sawdust removal for those finishes.
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I use mostly waterborne finishes therefor wipe down with denatured alcohol or even a damp ( with water) rag. If you don't flood the surface with water there is not much grain raising and it is looked after with the first light sanding. Cheers, JG
Ba r r y wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Stacey says...

I use a vacuum, a tack cloth and a wipe down with naphtha in that order. The naphtha will take away any tack rag residue and it is good for removing all the other gunk sticking to your wood like skin oil, and oil, grease and wax from machines. There are also tack rags available that don't use a sticky residue, but collect the dust in the fibers of the cloth.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 29 May 2005 21:05:40 -0500, Hax Planx

You'll find a ton of other similarly dangerous solvents to do the same job. However, I'd recommend alcohol as being the lesser of all evils [when used externally :-) ]. Volatile naphtha is positively definitely out in my book.
Also recommended, likely understood, but worth a mention ...a lightly damped cloth, used quickly enough to avoid evaporation, not a soaking of the wood.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Guess who says...

Unfortunately, nothing compares to naphtha for cleaning up grease and oil and just because you can't see any doesn't mean it isn't there. Alcohol doesn't put a dent in it, nor does acetone. For a graphic illustration of this, try cleaning something greasy or oily in each. It is a fire hazard, but not as much so as gasoline, which we use regularly in much greater volumes and even more dangerous circumstances. Filling up your car is an accident waiting to happen. You have a large volume of extremely volatile and extremely flammable fuel with an enclosed space above it containing a mixture of the volatile fumes and air. One spark and the fireworks begin. Yes there is some danger if it is handled carelessly, but as woodworkers we handle volatile flammable materials all the time, so I assumed everyone was with the program of not setting their work area on fire.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 30 May 2005 10:57:19 -0500, Hax Planx

No mean-spiritedness intended here, but really, if you have THAT much grease on your work, you need another hobby. I've often gone not even close to that extent [using alcohol] and had absolutely no problems finishing whatsoever.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.