What is "Lyptus?"

Three places that carry hardwoods in my area have something called Lyptus. In color and grain structure it looks similar to Genuine Mahogany, but it may be a little harder and heavier. What is it, and where does it come from? Is a good furniture wood? Is it a good tonewood (for guitars, etc.)? Any idea if it could be used to make acoustic guitar necks?
--Steve
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Google is (still) your friend.
Start looking here; http://www.weyerhaeuser.com/ourbusinesses/buildingproducts/lyptus /

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Doug Brown wrote:

Perhaps so, but I was more interested in the experiences of those who have actually used it on projects.
--Steve
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Mon, Nov 20, 2006, 5:06pm (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@sureNOSPAMwest.net (Steve) doth sayeth: Perhaps so, but I was more interested in the experiences of those who have actually used it on projects.
I just re-read your original post, and you certainly didn't say that there.
JOAT Democratic justice. One man, one rock.
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eucalyptus
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No, try again.

Lyptus.
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Used it for a couple of things. Never again. Dimensional stability is not it's strong point. Cutting and assembly should be done as close together as possible. Works well enough but tends to splinter if you're not careful. A eucalyptus hybrid, it's plantation grown and grows very quickly.

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I built a sofa table w/ it, 3 levels, 49 joints- I completely agree on the dimension instabilty property- finishes nice though (very similar to mahogany)- it splinters more than I'd like too.
Bottom line- I wouldn't use it (again ) for a solid wood table top- I am considering using a Lyptus plywood top w/ lyptus frame coz I do like the looks in the ~$5 bd foot range.
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What type of eucalyptus are we talking about? I use eucalyptus marginata and eucalytpus diversicolor (jarrah and karri respectively) quite frequently and don't have much trouble at all. This is OLD wood though - reclaimed timber from down under. It is very splintery, but with sharp blades I find it mills quite well. Just last week we made a simple kimono rack for a client out of a beautiful piece of curly jarrah. Amazing piece of wood.
JP
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It's not eucallytus. It is a hybrid that is sold under the name lyptus.
wrote:

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I read somewhere that it is some kind of genetically engineered hybrid by Weyerhaeuser. The article also stated that the product (or process) was/is patented.
Mike O.
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On Mon, 20 Nov 2006 22:29:12 -0600, Mike O. wrote:

According to <http://www.specialtyforest.com/product/lumber/lyptus.htm it's a hybrid of Eucalyptus Grandis and Eucalyptus urophylla (note to CW--Eucalyptus is a genus, not a species, there are many, many kinds of eucalyptus with different properties). I've seen it, it looks nice, how it works I have no idea--might give it a try on a small project sometime. Be nice if Weyerhauser would put up some structurals.

--
X:\Newsreaders\sig.txt

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The above is correct. The tree is plantation grown in Brazil by different forestry company (subsiduary?) and marketed by Weyerhauser.
The wood is varied density - darker reds ususally indicates heavier and weighs in more than Maple. The end grain of a board should be coded for density. It's as strong as oak and looks like Mahogany. The wood splinters a bit more than Oak, although I've had more splinters in my hands from Oak. The wood is generally straight grained and knot free, and seems exceptionally dry (at least mine is). It machines OK but dulls edges like any other dense wood and burns easily. Sawdust produced by sawing, planing look the same and both create a lot of fine air borne particulates as does sanding. Resawing in the bandsaw filled the shop with dust even with the dust collector going. A 20" box fan with a paper furnace filter behind helps clean the air quicker. Takes an oil finish easily.
The Lyptus has distinctive aromatics that I find pleasant. I like aromatic cedar - my mother in law loathes it, so it's like that. Be aware that the dust created has some issues. I and a few others have has eyes swollen shut requiring a dose of steriods and inhaled dust will burn sinuses. I have since bought a full face mask/respirator when I cut the stuff, have the dust collector on and the box fan going.
Pete
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I got a bit of it last year just because I liked the idea of it being plantation grown. It is very dense. Because of the rapid growth rate, the fiber structure isn't too tight so it will tend to splinter, especially if you are routing an end grain profile. It glues well, sands well, does burn a bit when drilling unless you turn the speed down some, takes oil and lacquer finishes well. I hadn't noticed any unusual movement. You won't get a bunch of boards that will match in color, it will be more calico like hickory can be, only in the red, pink, and white range. It is more pink when fresh cut, and goer redder as it ages. The price is good, and I will buy some more to make spec pieces out of. I have a show in January called the 'Green Earth' show which features products that are enviromentally friendly, and it will be a good item to have there. I would love to have some log sections to turn into bowls, but it is only available in 8/4 and less stock. If I could get to Brazil, maybe I could get some. I have turned some spindle pieces out of it and it turns well also.You can also get a wonderful finish with a card scraper. robo hippy snipped-for-privacy@mts.net wrote:

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J. Clarke wrote:

Many common names for trees (oak, maple, birch, beech, spruce, pine) refer to an entire genus and many will hybridize in the wild, like oaks and some spruce.
sometimes 'groups' species within a genus will be referred to collectively based on wood properties or characteristics of the trees, e.g. red, white, live, and chestnut oak, or hard and soft maple, and not infrequently the trees will be grouped differently from the woods from those trees, and differently by different authorities leading to endless discussions here about whether a particular tree or wood is red or white oak, etc.
--

FF


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Mon, Nov 20, 2006, 4:19pm (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@sureNOSPAMwest.net (Steve) doth plaintively query: Three places that carry hardwoods in my area have something called Lyptus. <snip>
I always thought Lyptus was when you got bit by a werewolf.
I went to google and typed in Lyptus. Took a total of about 5 seconds to get more info on Lyptus then I ever needed to know. I guess you forgot, google is your friend.
JOAT Democratic justice. One man, one rock.
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