What is it? Set 535

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This is correct.
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    Posting from the usenet newsgroup rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
3121)    A current-measuring shunt resistor.
    The current is applied to the two large binding posts and goes     directly into the ribbon of metal.
    The two small binding posts are connected to the ribbon via what     appears to be spot welds (the small wires about an inch from     each large binding post).
    The position of the spot welds is to set a precise resistance so     you have a precise voltage across the small binding posts for a     given current.
    Most current shunts are for 50 mV at the full rated current, but     this looks like a significantly larger resistance for the     current capability of the metal ribbon and thus a higher     voltage. It might be as high as 1V at fullrated current, which     suggests that it was also used in circuits with relatively high     voltages.
3122)    This looks like part of an early and special purpose color     TV camera. Each lens focuses onto a different B&W videcon,     through a different color filter, and the different apertures     are to balance out the relative light loss in the filters.
    If the lenses were larger and more widely spaced, I would think     that it was an early projection TV -- back when there were three     different CRTs, each with a different color phosphor.
    At a guess, this was for converting movie film to video tape.
3123)    This looks like a throttle lever for a multi-engine aircraft.
3124)    A "Necker's Knob". It clamps onto a steering wheel allowing     the driver to steer with a single hand, while the other arm is     around his girlfriend.
    They were common in the 1950s and maybe the early 1960s.
    These were reputed to be rather dangerous in use.
3125)    No real idea. A second view might help. It sort of looks like     there is a half cylinder behind the jaws to hold something. if     the teeth were staggered, I would think that it might be to     perforate something. It might be for something like breaking a     poker chip in half.
3126)    Strange. It at first looks like a flash hider for a weapon,     except that the part which would slide over the barrel is     occupied by something else, which sort of looks like a wrench     for removing some part of the same weapon (the hex hole).
    The color looks like Army battle gear of some sort.
    But I *think* that is is some kind of flame torch. The fuel is     put into a part in the hex hole, which squirts the fuel into     the tube, where it is ignited. The holes surrounding the end     feed in more air to increase the burning rate near the point of     exit.
    Perhaps part of a flame thrower.
    Now to post this and then see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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I like this theory a lot.

I've seen similar things these days to enable one-armed people to drive.
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Sounds like a good answer to me but I'm still looking for a reference.
The rest of this week's set have been properly identified:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2014/03/set-535.html#answers
If the resistor looks familiar it's because I posted it once before around seven years ago.
Rob
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On 3/7/2014 4:46 PM, Rob H. wrote:

Such a loss when people have no idea what it is.
--
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Christopher A. Young
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

What loss? We just need to think harder! ; )
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On 3/7/2014 6:52 PM, Bill wrote:

Or maybe it's an item we no longer need, like buggy whip straightener.
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Christopher A. Young
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Whether we "need" it or not has nothing to do with the challenge. Obviously, most of these items are obsolete as of the current date.
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Bill wrote:

But some of them are Not obsolete as examples of man's creativity and ingenuity! That's part of the beauty of it.
Bill
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:-)
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Lee Michaels wrote:

talk with myself! Sometime the arguments get really heated! ; )
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Bill wrote:

Yeah, and he's stubborn too!
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    I'll bet that you could get the information from GE, since it has the part numbers on it.

    Oh -- before I started posting in this thread, I think. Anyway, the resistance and current on that support my interpretation there -- the full-scale voltage is significantly higher than most modern shunts (which aim for 50 mV full scale. This one is 1.5 V full scale, (or 1500 mV if you prefer).
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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