What is it? Set 528

I need some help with 3080 and 3082 in this set:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/
Larger images:
http://imgur.com/a/P1BKy
Rob
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3084 I think this is an ice crusher. It looks like it is a nicer version of one we (posted on the group, and me personally) had here a few years ago. If I'm right, the handle can slide down on the shaft, and has a weak return spring. To use it, you drop an ice-cube into a glass. Then, you push down sharply a few times on the handle. The inertia of your hand, when the handle bottoms out on the shaft, drives the hardened spikes into the cube, shattering it. The one I had worked well and quickly. It also had the minor problem of making small chips of glass that you could swallow.
On 1/16/2014 4:45 AM, Rob H. wrote:
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Ice crusher is correct, the handle doesn't slide though there is a sleeve around it that rotates, and through a slot you can see directions for making a number of different mixed drinks so it looks like this tool was meant to be used by a bartender. There is also a bottle opener on the end.
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Rob H. wrote:

You have some tough ones this week!
#3083 -- For measuring the thickness of a brake rotor?
Bill
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Nope, that's not it.
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3083 I'll make the (unhelpful) guess that this is a thickness gauge. After all, it says gauge on the side. I speculate that it is spring loaded, so that you can wind up the pointer, reach with the handle, and pull the trigger to take a measurement. I'd expect it to be spring loaded so you can remove it from the test object. It seems to be calibrated in hundredths of an inch. I have no idea what it is intended to measure, but will guess: wood.
On 1/16/2014 4:45 AM, Rob H. wrote:
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Nope, it isn't for wood, it was marked as being for paper but it turns out that is not correct.
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3079 Wild guess... Annunciator board for an alarm system.
On 1/16/2014 4:45 AM, Rob H. wrote:
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It was made by Western Electric, based on that I don't think it was for alarms.
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who's calling, pushbuttons enable you to call them. THEN, you pick up the phone at your station, which is often a party-line, so that's why the lights.
3080...
3081 Sure looks like the hub of a two-bladed aircraft propeller.
3082...
3083 a thickness gauge for hot stock... maybe for sheet metal coming out of a roller mill. The 'cup' affair contains a watch spring. The dial is screwed out against the spring ALL the way, then locked with the detent.
It's thrust over the edge of the work, then the remote draw handle is pulled to release the detent. The gauge screws itself down to the work with the watch spring. The the gauge is again locked by the detent, and withdrawn to read.
3084 looks like an uptown meat tenderizer or ice chipper
Lloyd
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I think you are right about it being for phones but I don't know if it was for a ship or not.

Correct

Good answer, the patent says it's for hot plates in a rolling mill.
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Hanging my head in shame for *not* getting that one! Dad was a propeller mechanic from WWII until his retirement in the early 80s... Though the only two blade fixed prop I was ever around was wooden, and the only aluminum ones were variable pitch.
--
William

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Well, I've never seen one from that particular perspective, but I have a number of hours PIC single-engine-land. The roots were what gave it away for me. All the aircraft I've flown but the Stearman had aluminum props. Most fixed, but three models variable.
Lloyd
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On 1/16/2014 3:45 AM, Rob H. wrote:

3081. Easy one. Bottom of a steering wheel.
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On 1/16/2014 4:45 AM, Rob H. wrote:

3079, early ammusement park game, or maybe a fire signalling telegraph from the days of fire boxes. 3080, no clue. Maybe spotting scope for fire watch tower? 3081, I may have seen one before, but can't place this one. 3082, look like a tool a marine merchant might carry. 3083, scale for very tall babies? 3084, meat cutter's pogo stick
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I think this one is probably Asian, maybe Chinese, it looks similar to a sumitsubo which is a chalk or ink line that has a reel for the string. I'm sure it's not a sumitsubo but it's the closest thing I've seen to it so far.
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Someone suggested that this wooden item (3082) is a wine bottle holder/pourer, I think that this is correct. I couldn't find one just like it but there are some similar ones here:
https://www.google.com/search? q=wine+bottle+holder+pourer+wood&safe=off&espv!0&es_sm&source=lnms&tbm=isch&s a=X&ei=DWvZUrOKEOm0yAGb_YCADg&ved AkQ_AUoAQ&biw40&bihx4
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    Posting from usenet newsgroup rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
3079)    At first glance, it looks like an old telephone switchboard     such as would be used at say a police station.
    *But* -- it does not have jacks, or other provisions for making     connections between the different stations, so it is likely more     a signaling device. Either push buttons to sound buzzers in     various offices, or lights to signal that someone in the offices     has pressed a button, needing service.
    It looks as though the bottom left-hand and bottom right-hand     devices are rotary switches -- perhaps to signal everyone, or to     turn on or off buzzers or the like.
3080)    Hmm ... lever A likely moves a screw part way into the 'C'     frame -- but it may not move enough to become visible. Or     perhaps it retracts one to allow disconnecting something which I     think slides onto the cylindrical part pointing away in the     first photo.
    Or does it perhaps withdraw the click stop allowing free     swinging of the lever?
    The function of B and C are obviously to move a precise distance     relative to the frame, and the pin to allow the whole thing to     be tilted relative to the adjustment frame -- but *why* is not     clear.
3081)    "Everyone has seen"? Perhaps not often from this side?
    It could be something like a hub for a larger vehicle (eight lug     nuts if so),
    Or perhaps part of the manifold for a really large carburetor?
    Or The injection end for a fairly large rotary lawn sprinkler.
    Too large to be an agitator in a washing machine -- either     clothes or dish -- at least not for home use.
    Hub of a propeller -- with the apertures used to feed in     hydraulic fluid to change the pitch of the propeller blades,     and/or to expand de-icing boots on the blades. That would     indeed be something that not many younger people have seen     (since the dominance of jets for passenger aircraft.
3082)    Hmm ... something like an automatic brake on a sliding rope     or cable? If the cable were threaded through the bobbin, and     then the lever were pressed down to allow it to be threaded     through the U-shaped hasp, rope sliding from upper-left to lower     right would release the hasp and lever when the end passes the     hasp, and that would clamp down on the rope -- though it would     resist more strongly going in the other direction. And is the     bobbin actually wood? Not really strong enough for this kind of     task, I would think.
3083)    Aside from the parallel-jaw wood clamp holding it, I think     that the device is for measuring he thickness of something like     sheet metal -- looks like up to 1/4", and down to thinner than     1/64". The alternate markings are some gauge -- not the usual     where the smaller the number the larger the size, but rather the     inverse of that. Certainly not metric units, as you would have     25.4 mm per inch -- not 26 per 1/4"
    There is presumably a spring under the plate which rotates it in     the direction of closed (smaller) when the trigger is pulled.
    At a guess, I would say that either the workpiece is moving, or     it is too hot to approach with a normal micrometer.
    The pointer is set to the desired thickness, so you have an idea     whether you are close to the right setting without having to     pull the dial close enough to read. Probably it would be set to     either point to the stop plate operated by the trigger, or the     ridge out the other side, depending.
    I guess not for really hot material, because the operator would     have to pull it back and rotate the dial to re-cock it.
3084)    Two possibilities come to mind:
    a)    For measuring hardness of wood or something similar,         with the narrow window barely visible in the handle a         gauge as to how much pressure is being applied.
    b)    Injection into meat or something similar (if those tips are         hollow), in which case the window would indicate the         amount injected.
    Now to post and see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Thanks for posting the links, it is similar but it's hard to say for sure, below is a link to a close-up of the box, I didn't realize until now that two of the lights are red. If we could figure out the abbreviations that would help but I'm having no luck so far.
http://i.imgur.com/9FhR2Ll.jpg
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They've all been answered correctly this week, though I'm not 100% sure about the wine bottle holder but I think it's probably right.
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2014/01/set-528.html#answers
Rob
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