What is it? Set 518

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3019: 3020: Spring weight? 3021: tools for assembling ships in a bottle? 3022: Heating and cooling vent cover? 3023: bicycle spoke wrench 3033: Dowel maker?
On 11/7/2013 5:34 AM, Rob H. wrote:

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    Posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
3019)    An interesting device, and I'm going to make an assumption:
    That the two tubes are joined in the bottom of the device, and     may even be a single U-shaped tube (depending on what liquid     medium is used in it.
    The Joined tube makes a "manometer" which measures pressure by     displaying a different height on the two columns of liquid.     (You measure the heights of both, and subtract the lower from     the higher.
    If you are measuring a fairly high pressure, you would fill it     with mercury (Hg), likely to the 1-1/2" level to allow maximum     offset to be displayed. If mercury, the tube would pretty much     have to be continuous, as mercury attacks brass.
    If a lower pressure, use water (perhaps with a dye in it to     enhance readability.
    If yet lower -- go to something less dense, such as an alcohol.
    Since it does not appear to have a fitting for connecting to     something else, I'll suggest that it is intended to measure wind     velocity -- by pointing the snout towards the wind.
3020)    This is a "planimeter". It is used for measuring the enclosed
    area of a figure on paper or another flat surface. (This can     include areas of counties or states on a map, though the larger     the area vs that of the planet, the more error is introduced by     the choice of projection on the map.
    I have one, and I seem to remember that you posted another some     time back.
    You place a pivot (the disc in the left of the box, which likely     has three fine spikes to anchor it to the paper to avoid     slipping), pivot an arm from that, and connect the part with the     display to the first arm at another pivot (perhaps multiple     pivot locations, if it has adjustable scale factors). Then,     after zeroing the readout you trace the outline of the figure     with a pointer, and when you return to the starting point, you     can read the enclosed area. This one has a vernier to allow     dividing the "tenths" divisions on the drum into "hundredths".     The metal disk counts complete rotations of the drum.
    Mine includes another disc with a pivoted arm which generates a     specific area for a complete rotation of the arm, so you can     check the accuracy of the reading.
    <http://whistleralley.com/planimeter/planimeter.htm
3021)    At first glance, these look like a lock picking set, but those     would not need the grip of the rubber handles, so I will suggest     that these are hooks for installing/removing springs in     something like typewriters, calculators, or other mechanical     devices (including, perhaps, old teletypewriters.)
3022)    Looks like a table designed to clamp onto a vertical pole.
    The shape of the cutout suggests square posts, but the clamp     pieces seem to be for a particular range of round ones instead.
    It might be to cover a hole around a gutter downspout.
3023)    This appears to be for bending levers (likely for pre-Selectric     typewriters). It looks like the gaps are 1/16" and 3/32", and     the heads are way too thick for it to be an open-end wrench.
    I'm curious about the 3/4" wide 6" scale. I've never seen one     labeled "Sears" before. It looks like many others by many other     companies. The two which I have in my belt pouch are from     "General" and "Etched Products Corporation", and the former     looks like a match except for the name and the part number.
3024)    This looks like a tool for turning a round tenon on the end of     something made of wood -- given the size, perhaps a spar for     sailing ships, or perhaps some of the rigging for drawing a     wagon by a team of horses.
    Now to post this and see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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I heard back from the owner of this device, the tubes are connected at the bottom as seen in a new photo that is posted with the answers, and there is a hole in the stem that goes to the tube. Thanks to everyone who helped figure out this manometer.
The rest of the answers for this week can be seen here:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2013/11/set-518.html#answers
Rob
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"Rob H." <

Rob, did you ever find the answer for item 2982 in set 511? pdk
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No, I never found a reference that could confirm any of the guesses for it.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/Album18/pic2982a.jpg
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3019)     O.K. If the tubes are joined by the block at the bottom, instead of being a single tube, this probably means that it is not filled with mercury.
    And for 3" difference with mercury, that gives only 1.47 PSI maximum, and even model steam engine boilers work to near 100 PSI.
    With water instead, it drops to 0.108 PSI. Totally useless for measuring steam head in the boiler, but for checking flow of heating air through the flues -- that would be a reasonable sensitivity. The units program does not cover inches of methanol or inches of ethanol, other likely liquids (though less likely than water, and the brass would show discoloration from mercury, as it would get shiny for a short time, and then dull and gray as an amalgam formed.
3021)    I should have guessed the broken key extractors, though I have     never seen any.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Thanks, I just forwarded your post on to the owner of the manometer.
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Another application could be to check for small domestic gas leaks. You connect it up, then turn off the gas supply and see if the pressure drops over time. I've not done the calculations but they seem more in the right range.
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Ok thanks, I'll pass this along also.
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