What is it? Set 510

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I couldn't find the exact same hammer on the web but I'm almost certain that this is correct.
Just posted the answers for this set, still not sure about the saw but I'm confident in the rest of them:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2013/09/set-510.html#answers
Rob
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Some of those old time people were totally clever. Sadly, our modern generation can't do these things. Kids these days.....
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 9/13/2013 5:26 PM, Rob H. wrote:

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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Do you think they don't make dead blow mallets with replaceable tips anymore.
https://www.google.com/search?q ήad+blow+mallet+replaceable+tip
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in part:

For 2974 you say in part: "The mason who produced this tool hated to lose mortar when connecting two cinder blocks. Too often the mortar fell into the holes in the block and could not be retrieved. This tool was made to be positioned on top of a block, the mortar was then placed on the block, next the tool was removed, and another cinder block placed on top." Does stopping the mortar falling in weaken the wall significantly? It seems like the mortar that falls in and remains connected to the main mass of mortar will provide some stability to sideways movement, and sticking to the inside of the block also increase strength under tension. (In other words, I think that sloppy work can increase the strength of the wall, perhaps significantly.)
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Not much.
The hollow cavity concrete block is a relatively recent creation in building supplies. By the time it was in common use, there were already in place building regulations requiring poured columns and re-bar for strengthening structures laterally.
In addition, most of the mortar that falls over the edge just falls all the way to the bottom of the column. What remains on the lower block "keys" on the insides when the upper block is mushed down onto it and seated true.
When this fellow invented the aid, he must've not been a very experienced BLOCK mason (may have been a spectacular brick or stone mason), because the block masons I've worked with hardly spill a teaspoonful inside, until the upper block is placed. By then, you've got to take off the shield...
Add to that, that a lot of masons 'butter' the upper block, rather than mounding mortar up on the lower one. It's easier because they can position it at will, rather than having to deal with the position it's in on the wall.
The last really good block mason in north central Florida died a few years back... Ben Fitts... He wasn't even 'technically' a block mason, but a concrete contractor, but he could do magic with block. He was a wonderful OLD black fellow, who at 80 could break a 6-foot man in two with three fingers. He always told his men, "If you do your job, I'll call you 'sir'. If I ever stop calling you 'sir', you're in trouble."
Now, all we have for that work are itinerant crews of very young Mexican men, who work their asses off, but they're not great masons. Haven't seen a plumb, square wall in years...
I've nothing against them; these crews just aren't very good masons. The very best drywall mechanic I ever saw was a 25-year-old Mexican fellow who could do a whole 1200sq.ft. house, hung and first-coat taped in two days; four days to completely finished, and -- ALONE! (and when he was done and it was primed, you couldn't see a joint, anywhere!
Lloyd
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On Thursday, September 12, 2013 3:04:54 AM UTC-5, Rob H. wrote:

com/ The larger images can also be seen here: http://imgur.com/a/SMMZ6 Rob
2971 seems to be some sort of quick release "clamp" and the shape of the cl amping faces seems might fit onto something like a spare tire or some bevel ed (center?) surface. The end of the threaded rod would attach the unit to the vehicle, trailer or some other transport.
Or for some other similar clamping of two halves, of something, together? For pressing of some two units together, yet able to be quickly released?
Sonny
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    Aha! I was looking for it as a note on the blog site before I got to the usenet posting. Thanks.
    Posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always. Which of the three newsgroups are the rest of you posting from?
2971)    Two possibilities, depending on the size and the hidden     details of the linkage.
    a)    To pull two objects together with features shaped to         fit the trapezoidal wedge shapes. (Not very strong,         though, based on the apparent thickness of the metal in         the shapes.)
    b)    They sort of look like the profile of some styles of         house gutter -- so perhaps a tool to help in shaping and         attaching the ends to some of the continuous formed         gutters (made from a roll by a pickup truck-mounted         machine.
2972)    Assuming that the needles are lose in holes in the brass     cylinder, it could be a cartridge for a needle scaler, usually     fitted to an air chisel type hammer, and used to remove     welding scale from freshly welded joints.
    Those that I have seen, however, tended to include the shank     which fits into the air chisel.
2973)    A hammer with a hard head (facing away) and the provisions for     a soft head. The part which unscrews is case into a head made     of a plastic or rubber (plastic is usually a transparent yellow,     rubber I've seen in black, green, and red), or lead.
    Once cast, the head is screwed into the hammer head for use,     until it gets too worn from use, at which point the steel core     screw is recovered and a new head is cast around it -- or a new     head is purchased and screwed in. The casting form of repair is     more likely in the lead format. And for that, there is a     missing piece -- a mold which closes around the threaded part,     and shapes the lead as it is poured in.
2974)    For forming decorative patterns on walls or fences. Either
    a)    It is pressed repeatly into still fresh concrete or         stucco to make the pattern (keying the last shape at one         end into the first shape at the other end).
    b)    It is used as a stencil for spraying a contrasting paint         around the pattern -- probably with the wire side away         from the surface being painted, and the angle is         adjusted so there are no shadows of the wires left in the         painted surface.
2975)    Perhaps for cleaning holes in lab glassware, or in cast metal     tools which allow airflow or something similar (e.g. a spray     paint gun.) Hmm ... a bit large for the latter use, I think.
2976)    Hmm ... no springs visible, just a rope and pulleys.
    The teeth look to be for bi-directional wood sawing for green     limbs.
    If there were a spring forcing the two jaws apart, I could see     it being placed between the piece to be cut and another limb,     and the spring provides the force to hold the teeth in contact     with the workpiece.
    Or -- if the toothed edge were rotated to face *towards* the     other jaw, the rope could be pulled tight to keep the teeth     forced into a piece of wood held between the jaws.
    Now to post and then see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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