What is it? Set 506

Page 2 of 2  


    At least with the posting to Rec.crafts.metalworking. Most people here will have a pretty good eye for handedness on threads. :-) Probably the woodworkers, too, though I think that left-handed wood screws are pretty uncommon. :-)
    [ ... ]

    And they probably used a desk ruler or a tape measure, so getting a reading that accurate would be pretty unlikely. :-)

    Well ... brass and bronze look very much alike, especially when clean. They develop somewhat different patinas, but the real thing is strength. A tool should be bronze, not brass, and I would be willing to bet that this one is bronze. If anyone could track down the logo on the handle it would probably show up listed as bronze -- maybe phosphor bronze, or maybe even Berylium Copper.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Remove oil spill source from e-mail
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | (KV4PH) Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

beer through? I would have expected a series of small ports between the threads.
I think there is a hole on the other side near the tip of the screw, I should have taken some more photos but was in a hurry at the time and just took a couple of shots.
The person at the military blog agreed that 2950 was a projectile but hasn't yet given more information about it.
My answers for this week have been posted here:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2013/08/set-506.html#answers
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

BTW    When you need help with answers to some, could you please     include the number(s) (e.g. 2433) instead of saying "the fifth     from the top" or "the second and fifth"? Given how far apart     you space them (at least as seen on my browser), it is easy to     lose count when scrolling down from the top -- especially if the     scrolling is somewhat jerky, which can cause me to skip over one     or two..
    Thanks,         DoN.
--
Remove oil spill source from e-mail
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | (KV4PH) Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes I can do that, no problem.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DoN. Nichols wrote:

2962 - I recognized that pry bar end, but the other end was different. We called it a Halligan tool and it was carried in the trunk of a police car. The other end had a 90 degree spike for cutting holes in things.
--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
willshak wrote:

I shoulda said 'punching' holes in things. Mostly used to getting into locked car doors to rescue people. This was before the Jaws-of-life tool was invented.
--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/15/13 4:01 AM, Rob H. wrote:

2950: The M256 is a smoothbore gun used on the US M1 and M1A1 tanks. The bore is 4.7". It's a version of the German Rheinmetall L/44, meaning the barrel is 44 calibers long. I wonder if this could be a practice round, dug out of a berm at a target range.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't know much about this one so I sent the photos to a person who runs a military blog, hopefully he will provide a good reference for it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rob H. wrote:

2947 - Wine tap?
2948 - Valve lapping/grinding tool
2949 -
2950 - 4.5" shell for large gun.
2951 - Tubing bender.
--
Steve W.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rob H. wrote:

2947 - Wine tap?
2948 - Valve lapping/grinding tool
2949 -
2950 - 4.5" shell for large gun.
2951 - Tubing bender.
2952 - C6 multi sledge, another of a long line of "improved entry tools" made for police/fire use.
--
Steve W.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Rob H." wrote in message
I need some help with the fifth one this week:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/
Rob
2948 Tool for grinding and finish of motor valves. WW
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Just a wild guess: 2950 I think this could be a foundryman's crucible for metal. The marks around the periphery tally with the use of tongs in handling. I don't think it's ordnance. It appears to be cast. Cast is relatively brittle. If it were a shell head, why would there be casting marks on the base? What would prevent it shattering in the barrel of a gun, especially if it were packed with explosive material? Could be a mould for something such as 44mm shell heads, if such a thing exists. I'm not much into ordnance. Nick.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/16/13 9:32 AM, Nick wrote:

I don't know enough to refute you, but the crucibles I saw when I googled, have thinner walls. The diameter of the hole appears to be about 60mm.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

'Makes no sense to spend all your fuel heating the crucible, and hardly any heating the contents!
Lloyd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.