What is it? Set 503

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Hopefully this won't be a double post but I'm not seeing the one I made two hours ago.
This week's set has been posted:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/
Rob
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I didn't see the earlier post.
2929 Comb for some tough coarse fibrous material. (hemp?)
2931 Beehive boxes for an environment where it is important to assure no tampering with the hives???
2932 Horn. Steam foghorn? Siren?
2933 Map route measuring device. I have one of these, in cheap plastic. The little wheel at the lower right is geared to a full-face dial indicator on the other side. You roll it along a route on a map and read total distance.
2934 Pieces of pretty-much-standard chain conveyor belt. What is unusual about these?
On 7/25/2013 6:11 AM, Rob H. wrote:

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On 25/07/2013 7:44 PM, Alexander Thesoso wrote:

2929 a hand operated device for carding wool
2933 is a percussion cap box , which is als0 used to place the a percussion cap on the nipple of a caplock firearm
2934 conveyor chain
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On 7/25/2013 6:37 AM, Bluey69 wrote:

I'm sure Bluey69 is right and I was wrong. For reference, what I was talking about is a "chartometer".
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Correct, the patent for it is from 1839.
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On 25/07/2013 6:14 PM, Alexander Thesoso wrote:

It's unusual if you aren't familiar with it.
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Correct, I'm told it's called hook chain.

Not much, but in the nine years that I've been doing this site these are the only chain conveyors that I've seen that were not hooked up to a machine.
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Go to any County Fair or theme park and order a Churro. Then go look at the ovens they come out of...
It's weird, things like that you should be able to "pick up anywhere" but I've never seen a catalog where they list things like that. You used to get the various twist and link chains and sprockets with Erector Sets and would be useful for many Rube Goldberg-ing projects.
--<< Bruce >>--
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Ok I know 2934 looks like the belt conveyor for an industrial washing machine we had one at an old job and was used for washing machined metal parts.
"Rob H." wrote in message
Hopefully this won't be a double post but I'm not seeing the one I made two hours ago.
This week's set has been posted:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/
Rob
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I haven't seen any industrial washing machines recently so I'll take your word for it, they are also used on harvesting equipment.
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On 25/07/13 11:11, Rob H. wrote:

2929 is for cleaning/dressing buffing wheels when they get loaded. I've got one in the workshop. http://www.mscdirect.co.uk/ABW-51573L/SEARCH:KEYWORD/product.html
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Didn't realize they still made these, for some reason I thought it might be an antique.
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2929 is a buffing rake. it is used to remove excess buffing compound from cloth buffing wheels. 2933 is a capper for holding percussion caps and putting them on the nipples of a cap and ball revolver.
Paul K. Dickman
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Rob H.:

2931 - For putting rented beehives into?
2934 - Conveyor belts.
--
Mark Brader | "Some societies define themselves by being open to new
Toronto | influences, others define their identity by resisting.
  Click to see the full signature.
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2929 - Buffing wheel rake. I've got two of these ... When the wheel gets too loaded with buffing compound, I clean it with the rake and apply fresh compound.
Joel
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On 7/25/2013 5:11 AM, Rob H. wrote:

2934 Delivery Conveyor for hamburger patties over an open flame at Burger King. ;!)
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On 7/25/2013 5:11 AM, Rob H. wrote:

2931 Fireworks storage units
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On 7/25/13 10:33 AM, Leon wrote:

I thought, "Of course!"
But then...
I'd expect fireworks boxes to have rain-shedding roofs. I'd expect them to have air circulation below to keep the insides dry. By the look of the door, they seem to be simple plywood enclosures. White plywood boxes of fireworks surrounded by a chain link fence on an open field would invite mischief by vandals with firearms.
It's peculiar that the numbers are on the opposite side from the doors, and they're too small to read from across the field. The door seems to have a handle on the inside. Why would somebody want to go in and shut the door?
The pole appears to be about 6" in diameter and 25' high. Why would it have been erected?
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email.me:

them

Display fireworks must be stored in a minimum of a Type 4 magazine. Plywood boxes don't even come close to the required metal or masonry construction required for a Type 4. Consumer fireworks require no kind of magazine at all, and would normally just be stored in a locked warehouse.
Lloyd
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On 7/25/13 8:03 PM, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

That pole looks just like the flagpole in front of an office building a block from here. I know where it is! It's a defunct military base.
Some soldiers would try to be indoors during colors so they wouldn't have to stop and stand there saluting. Evening colors could catch them by surprise because it happened at a different time every day. Those boxes were built for such emergencies. Beetle Bailey could jump in and close the door so he wouldn't have to salute. It would be a breach of etiquette for an E-1 to jump in on top of an E-6. So they're marked, 1-6.
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