What is it? Set 493

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2869: I think I've seen these before, described as adjustable gap spark tester.. the round ring part being made of an insulating material bakelite, phenolic etc.
-- Cheers, WB .............

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Spark tester is correct, it's for use on small engines.
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On 5/16/2013 10:56 AM, Wild_Bill wrote:

....And I would guess it might be used for a 2 cylinder outboard.
Kevin Gallimore
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#2872 I suspect that this is for setting the depth of cut on a woodworking plane or jointer.
There are better pictures of some out on the net. http://www.ricardo.ch/kaufen/handwerk-und-garten/werkzeuge/messen/praezisions-messlehre-0-1mm-schwarz-sche-schrankmesslehre/v/an705890348/?ABTestedFeatureKeyY From what I see, the little tab on the upper left can move relative it the to the bar that runs down the remainder of the left side. This movement is magnified by gears or linkages to the pointer. I have several old test indicators that work on the same principle.
If you lay the stationary bar on the infeed side of a planer and the tab on the outfeed, as you lower the infeed table the depth of cut would read off in mm.
Paul K. Dickman
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messlehre-0-1mm-schwarz-sche-schrankmesslehre/v/an705890348/? ABTestedFeatureKeyY

Yes, the owner of it replied and said the same about the tab on the upper left.

Setting the depth of woodworking tools seems to be a sensible use for it, I'll forward this on to the owner.
Thanks
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    Posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
2869)    Hmm ... looks like some kind of arc with the third electrode     at an angle used to inject a high voltage spike to start the     arc.
    From the size of the bulldog clip, it is fairly high current,     but not excessively high.
    I presume that the ring is something like Bakelite (a fiber     filled plastic).
2870)    This could be anything -- including something made just to     prove that you can do it as a test of the material or the     machine tool.
2871)    Looks like something which could slide in one direction along     a wood beam, and lock when slid in the other direction.
2872)    A small force gauge, and given the size, it could be a stylus     pressure gauge (for phonograph needles). Depending on the     vintage, the scale could be in ounces, or grams -- more likely     the latter.
2873)    Hmm ... perhaps a shock mount for attaching a pocket watch to     the end of a cloth ribbon style of fob.
2874)    This one, at least, is quite clear -- one of two very similar objects:
    a)    An air chisel (minus the chisel blade which fits in         the spring retainer).
    b)    An air riveting tool.
    The difference between the two is length of stroke and number of     beats per minute, I believe.
    Now to see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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