What is it? Set 477

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I found a few more similar ones
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Snap-on-M1318-M1322-obstruction-distributor - wrench-set-lot-2-/170977946020?hash=item27cf1469a4&item0977946020 &pt=Motors_Automotive_Tools&vxp=mtr
http://www.ebay.com/itm/MAC-S98-S67-3-4-obstruction-distributor-wrench - set-lot-2-/170977940210?hash=item27cf1452f2&item0977940210 &pt=Motors_Automotive_Tools&vxp=mtr
apparently it is some sort of obstruction wrench for working around starters, distributers, etc...
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On 1/26/13 11:48 PM, usablevirus wrote:

Wow! A 3/4" distributor wrench!
The Cornwell looks the same as the Thorsen in the size of the box, the way it's on the same side of the shaft as the handle, and the length of the shaft.
My theory that the Thorsen had two boxes for situations where there was very little room to turn a wrench, has a weakness. If space were that tight, you'd have to flip the wrench approximately 24 times per revolution.
On the Thorsen, the length of the arms looks different. Now I see that the flattened sections look equally long, but the round sections look quite different in length.
I believe the arms are of different lengths. I think it was designed to work on more models than the Cornwell. It would be analogous to a cruciform lug wrench, designed to work on any car an independent mechanic might encounter.
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I've gotten a few emails from people who own similar tools and who say it is a distributor wrench, as well as people posting here in the newsgroups who have said the same, so I went ahead and changed my answer identifying it as such. I'm still waiting to hear back from Thorsen, and will be happy to change my answer if they or anyone else has evidence to the contrary.
Rob
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On 1/27/2013 1:32 PM, Rob H. wrote:

Rob way back when I used distributor wrenches they always had 2 bends and or a bend with an end to place a ratchet which would create the second bend. The distributor wrench has to bend to reach under the distributor and bend again to give you leverage to turn it.
http://www.google.com/search?q=distributor+wrench&hl=en&safe=off&tbo=u&tbm=isch&source=univ&sa=X&ei=OoMKUfeiIZLqqAHxmYD4Aw&ved F0QsAQ&biw33&bihg9
Check out these wrenches, samples of each.
http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/showthread.php?ty794
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On 1/31/13 9:51 AM, Leon wrote:

http://www.google.com/search?q=distributor+wrench&hl=en&safe=off&tbo=u&tbm=isch&source=univ&sa=X&ei=OoMKUfeiIZLqqAHxmYD4Aw&ved F0QsAQ&biw33&bihg9
If I read you correctly, I'm not the only one who wants to bet on a different horse. The right leg of the Cornwell starter motor wrench looks functionally identical to Rob's.
1. 5/8" 2. 8" shaft 3. able to fit within a cylinder wall only 3/4" from the hex head 4. handle bends in same direction as box
The age looks similar to me.
http://home.comcast.net/~alloy-artifacts/cornwell-quality-tools-p2.html
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On 1/31/2013 7:13 PM, j Burns wrote:

LOL, Yeah! I am not saying what it is but am saying what it isn't. ;~) I think you would be hard pressed snaking that thing to the bottom side of a distributor.
It very well could be a specialized tool as some have indicated, perhaps not offered to the general public. Thorsen has been around a long time and they may have been an automobile manufacturer tool supplier. Dealerships get a highly specialized set of tools every year with the introduction of a new model year. GM used to use Kent tools to manufacture the special tools.

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On 1/31/13 9:14 PM, Leon wrote:

Your google images page showed me why some say it looks like a distributor wrench, but it's not clear that any is identical to Rob's in more than one of these ways:

The right leg of the Cornwell seems to be identical to Rob's in all four ways. Call me Mister Common Sense, but I say (at the risk of being sued for plagiarism), "when I see a bird that walks like a duck and swims like a duck and quacks like a duck, I call that bird a duck."
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On 1/27/2013 11:13 AM, j Burns wrote:

Typically a distributor wrench is not used to actually remove a distributor retaining bolt so much as to simply tighten and loosen the bolt so that the distributor could be rotated. Typically a 90 degree turn of the bolt was more than adequate.
That said that 2778 is not a distributor wrench. A distributor wrench has a handle that runs parallel to the end holding the box end of the wrench. It then makes a 90 degree turn to reach down the length of the distributor cap and distributor then makes another 90 degree bend to reach under the base of the distributor to the distributor shaft and retaining bolt. The distributor wrenches I always used had 3 sections with 2 bends.
Thorsen, the length of the arms looks different. Now I see that

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I think thats a good call... I've been working on cars since the 60's, and never recall seeing a distributor hold down bolt that large.
I bet it turns out to some special application wrench... will be interesting to see what Thorsen says!
Erik
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could it be a spark plug wrench. spark plugs are 5/8"
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On 1/26/13 1:03 PM, usablevirus wrote:

I like the image of a hexagon in a well, like some spark plugs! There must have been a need for spark plugs or fasteners in wells before they had socket sets. A wrench like the mystery item would have been the solution.
It reminds me of situations with a 3/8" ratchet and a 6" extension where I switched to a ratchet with smaller teeth because I couldn't move the handle very far at all. The alternative would have been a wrench like the mystery item, with two 12-point boxes. Once the fastener was untorqued, a tool to spin it out would have been a lot quicker.
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On 1/26/13 4:59 PM, j Burns wrote:

Correction: socket sets wouldn't have made this wrench obsolete. Until ratchet drives had enough teeth and little enough backlash to click on a 15-degree swing, a wrench like this may sometimes have been necessary.
My usual ratchet seems to have 44 teeth. Because of backlash, it takes about 15 degrees to get a click. I switch ratchets when I don't have room or 15 degrees.
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j Burns wrote:

Air ratchets are very reasonably priced at all kinds of places . I love mine , cost me a whole 40 bucks at Walmart about 5 or 6 years ago .
--
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2773. Shield for suit of armour.
2774. Flight case for .....err..... no idea.
2775. High level valve key.
2778. Ring spanner :o)
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On 1/24/2013 5:22 AM, David B wrote:

Flight case for a golf bag and clubs.

--
Jeff

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On 1/24/2013 3:36 AM, Rob H. wrote:

2775. Valve shut on/off tool 2778. Automotive distributor wrench.
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2773 Just has to be a work of art.
2774 Is obviously a shipping case, probably for a musical instrument.
2775 I see that several people have said 'valve key'. In the 1964 Burt Lancaster movie, "The Train", he uses a tool exactly like this to undo the track fastening bolts on a WWII french railroad line.
2776 Fasces http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fasces Symbol of power, historically used by Romans, and Italian WWII and pre-war Fascists.
On 1/24/2013 4:36 AM, Rob H. wrote:

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Alexander Thesoso:

Or a prop for a movie fantasy... which, of course, would also count as a work of art.

I'm going from memory here, but I say not exactly. In the movie, the bolts in the track have hexagonal heads, and the business end of the tool is like the socket you'd find on a socket wrech.
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In January, we were looking at this item in set 477:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/Album%2015/pic2775.jpg
which shows a valve key for turning off a water supply.
And Alexander Thesoso wrote:

And I (Mark Brader) wrote:

Having now seen the scene again, I was almost right. The tool that Labiche (Burt Lancaster) uses does have a socket like a socket wrench. But the heads of the track bolts aren't hexagonal; they're square.
But because they're square, a tool like the valve key, bearing on only two sides of the head, would also work.
And there's another scene where we see the bolts being turned -- that's a little earlier, where Labiche blows up a bit of track and the Germans patch it by moving a rail from behind the train. And the tool *they* use does have a head something like the valve key. (I picked exactly the wrong moment to walk away from the TV and locate the image from set 477, so i can't say if it was exactly the same, but it certainly was something like it.)
Now you know.
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snipped-for-privacy@vex.net | their own grave." -- EARTH GIRLS ARE EASY
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Thanks, didn't really expect to get an answer for this one.

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