What is it? Set 475

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    This makes a lot of sense. And it may have been used to trim the ends of a whole stack of straps (or belts for humans).
    As for scrap -- perhaps just put a rectangular trash can on the floor against the back. Or perhaps it is fed a continuous strip, leaving a concave cut on the back end.
    And is it possible that those pins were intended to have a hole in the strap placed over it, so the arc cut forms a half circle around that as a center. I don't see provisions for that to also punch the hole, so there must be another machine to punch the holes in the middle of the width of the strap.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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On Thursday, January 10, 2013 5:35:15 AM UTC-6, Alexander Thesoso wrote:

Or similar production facility. Yep, for large straps, too. That largest cutter seems to be 3 1/2" wide.
Similar press type cutters for upholstery fabric, for making covered buttons.
I must have exited before posting, previously. I had found this, a single strap end cutter. http://www.tandyleatherfactory.com/en-usd/home/3151-462.aspx
Sonny
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Good guess, harness cutter is correct. The last one is still unidentified but the rest of the answers have been posted here:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2013/01/set-475.html#answers
Rob
I thought I posted this twelve hours ago but it looks like I forgot to hit send, found this post when I got back on my computer this morning. Hope everyone has a great weekend.
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Thanks, Rob. I neglected to post my guess, this week. Just off in space some where.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Good guess, harness cutter is correct. The last one is still unidentified but the rest of the answers have been posted here:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2013/01/set-475.html#answers
Rob
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On 10/01/2013 5:03 PM, Rob H. wrote:

2766 A tool of some sort, temporarilyy fitted for aligning or centering something??
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On 1/10/13 4:03 AM, Rob H. wrote:

2761: I see a pawl. I think it was a turnstile. With only two arms, I guess it required a person to walk through an arc of nearly 180 degrees. That may have made it necessary to walk upright, ruling out ducking under the arm.
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Flow regulator valve of some sort. O-rings are a clue.
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On 11/01/2013 6:05 AM, Father Haskell wrote:

Thats what I thought, but there are no grooves for the O rings to sit in.
It's like the O rings are only to loosely "clamp" the outer metal bit to the white nylon looking inner part.
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Cutter -- note the bite marks in the bronze anvil and the out-cannel honed blades. Fence pickets? Mass production machine -- having a dozen or so preset channels means no time wasted setting up.
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    Posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
2761)    A two-man capstan -- a bit small but usable for not too great     a load. Most would have sockets for up to eight men to walk     around it with wooden bars stuck in square holes at the top.     one man or perhaps two would maintain tension on the free end of     the line. (This is called "tailing". The line would feed in at     the bottom and walk up the taper.
    The anchor chain or line (rope) would be wrapped several turns     around the barrel at the waist, and as they walked around it, it     would draw up the anchor -- or host a yard with a sail, or     anything else which required a lot of pulling force on a long     line.
    The ratchet pawl at about 5:00 O'Clock on the base clicks as it     passes over each of the radial ribs in the base plate (looks     like eight of them in total) and prevents it from turning     backwards. The pawl can be flipped over to allow turning in the     opposite direction if neeeded.
    The men would have to be careful to step over both the incoming     line, and the free end.
2762)    Strange in several ways. Each is held together with rivets, but     an Allen key and a small open end wrench packaged in the     carrying case. It looks as though the arms are intended to     slide into tracks of some sort.
    So I really don't know what this one is, and no real guess.
2763)    Assuming that the bottom end is hollow, I would say that it     is a decorative cap for the end of a flagstaff. The shape is     that of a halberd. It is not for our national flag, but it may     be for the flags for some church or fraternal organization --     perhaps Knights of Columbus?
2764)    Perhaps some uncommon form of (spinning) top?
2765)    It is designed to cut a half-round end on things of various     width (likely wood). Looks like perhaps a 2" or maybe 3" cut.
    There is a separate guide and cutter for each width
2766)    Hmm ... green anodized Aluminum -- or perhaps Titanium.
    The O-rings are to keep it from slipping off too easily.
    The Nylon part appears to adapt it to a smaller shaft, but may     not be an original part of it.
    Perhaps some kind of penetrator for testing hardness of     relatively soft items.
    Now to post and see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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2766 Piston for paint ball gun
Robert
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Robert wrote:

2766 Wax melts, rubber O-rings compress into metal part, and the part drops. --Part of an unreliable fire prevention mechanism? Or as part of a thermostat on something like a carburetor (that wasn't used so often that it bothered the owner to replace the wax piece often)?
Bill
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wrote:

2764: gavel and strike-block
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wrote:

Huh? Ink wells? I saw "palm gavel" and the block:
http://www.google.com/search?q=palm+gavel&aq=f&sugexp=chrome,mod%3D11&um=1&ie=UTF-8&hl=en&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi&ei=EYXxUP_tK-SXiALR6IHACg&biw 52&bihw7&seiXxUM-LA-joiwKxt4HYCQ
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http://www.google.com/search?q=palm+gavel&aq=f&sugexp=chrome,mod%3D11&um=1&ie=UTF-8&hl=en&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi&ei=EYXxUP_tK-SXiALR6IHACg&biw 52&bihw7&seiXxUM-LA-joiwKxt4HYCQ
A wider shot of the museum display is at the address below, I think the one on the left is glass, then pottery, and the last one which looks somewhat like a gavel block is wood, I'm guessing the top part is a lid.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/Album%2015/pic2764e.jpg
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It looks like something called "spikes" which are used to put speakers on in order to reduce any interference between the speakers and the music in the room. I am not sure of the theory or if it works in practice.
/Jon
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writes:

I asked the guy who sent the photo and he said that they are not speaker spikes.
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