What is it? Set 472

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I need some help with the second item this week:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Rob
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2745 is a portable spark coil or high-voltage generator -- for what purpose (lab? megging phone lines?) I don't know.
The first one I ever made had the annealed iron wire core, as does that one. Tuning the contactor part for minimum current at a given voltage yielded the highest voltage output (basically just tuning the contactor frequency to match the resonant frequency of the coil). I don't see the capacitor required for best performance, but it could have been placed in the base, as the capacitors were often flat-plate designs that early.
Lloyd
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This device isn't a generator.
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I did not mean "generator" in the sense of "dynamo". "Generator" as in "the maker of".
But then... if it doesn't work at high voltage, I don't know what it is. Except for the built-in ammeter, it's physically almost identical to my hand-made spark coil.
Lloyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote in message

I guess that I didn't read your first post closely enough, but it also isn't a spark coil. The metal tag on the side that you can see in the second photo has a two word name for this device, the first word is Magnetic.
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Rob H. wrote:

Then I'm guessing circuit breaker.
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It's not a circuit breaker.
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On 12/20/12 6:16 PM, Rob H. wrote:

If the iron wires were enameled, they would be a magnetic core designed for low eddy current losses. Four leads going to windings around a magnetic core suggest a transformer. The contacts remind me of a battery-powered doorbell, the kind that rang like a telephone or a fire alarm.
I think this device produced AC from DC. The purpose may have been to increase voltage.
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email.me:

They needn't be enameled to serve that purpose, and they are a core.
Consider that E-I laminations on more modern transformers are not enameled, although they are often varnished AFTER assembly.
The surface oxides on the wire - after the requisite annealing - and the lams after bluing is quite enough insulation to prevent any serious conduction between wires or lams.
LLoyd
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On 12/20/12 9:09 PM, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

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2743, probably to fold the seam, of sheet metal edge 2744, Model A Ford? 2745, I was thinking a crank to power generator. But, with the bundle of copper showing, maybe it's for reading amperage of a high power line? 2746, either for displaying pitted cherries in a refrigerated grocery case, or for climbing mountains, as a grappling hook. Or, for illegal fishing. 2747, used for rolling cigarettes. 2748, belt for a man with a bad back, needing lumbar support.
Most of these guesses will turn out to be wrong.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I need some help with the second item this week:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Rob
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2746 Used to hang sausage or meat for smoking.
Robert
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Meat hooks is correct, the tag said they were for game but I'm sure they could be used for other related purposes.
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Item 2747 seems to be a Tie-Press made from Bakelite:
http://www.gracesguide.co.uk/Corby_Tie_Press
Thanks for the interesting Blog, Merry Christmas from Germany
Walter
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wrote:

a particular manufacturer's card decks. I had one in about 1964, which I got from an uncle who had it at least 10 years before then.

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It does look like a card shuffling machine but this particular device is indeed a tie press, I had shopped off the name a tie company that was beneath the crown. No luck yet on the hood but the rest of the answers for this week have been posted:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2012/12/set-472.html#answers
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    Posting from Rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
2743)    These look like they are for punching holes at a set distance     from the edge of a steel strap.
    Or perhaps, it could be for flattening said steel strap.
    It would help to have them in my hands to be sure about this.
2744)    No real idea -- but something in the 1930s or earlier I     believe.
2745)    O.K. A magnetic core made of a bundle of mild steel wires,     which suggests that it is not a permanent magnet, but rather     intended for AC of some sort. (Early telephones had coils of     similar construction inside them, though not nearly as big a     bundle of mild steel wire as a core. :-)
    Adjustable contacts on either side of a swining arm.
    Multiple wires coming out the base. Enough for two windings,     say a lower voltage higher current one for the input, and a     higher voltage from the output.
    An ammeter to measure the current on the input side.
    I would suggest that this is intended to produce a fairly high     voltage AC from a low voltage DC (such as a lead-acid storage     battery).
    Or -- if the contacts are right, and there are both a low     resistance winding and a higher resistance one with a center tap,     the contacts could also rectify the output (like a synchronous     vibrator in some early tube based car radios).
    The ammeter is probably to help tuning the contact position for     the best power throughput. Looks like full scale is 20 Amps.     No clue that there is any marking about too high a current.
    Given the meter, I suspect that it was a piece of lab equipment,     not something for daily use. The handle on the top also     suggests that.
2746)    Perhaps for making beef jerky?
    Or for dragging a river or pond for recovering a body?
2747)    If it were smaller, I would suggest that it might be for rolling     cigarettes. More views might help.
2748)    Part of a load binder strap, perhaps?
    Is the end of the rope frayed, or does it have some special     construction?
    Now to post, and then see what others suggest.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
    
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Correct, the tag on the side of it says 'Magnetic Rectifier'.
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On Thu, 20 Dec 2012 04:06:25 -0500, Rob H. wrote:

2743 all are saw swages.
basilisk
--
A wink is as good as a nod to a blind horse

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This answer is correct.
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