What is it? Set 448

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Rob H. wrote:

2604 Targets?
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Good answer, that's what the owner said they were.
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As I mentioned, the owner of these items had told me they were targets, they didn't have any noticeable dents in them so I was skeptical but went with that answer for lack of a better one. Someone just sent me an email stating:
"They are actually "frying pan" or "pancake" pipe line blanks, for blanking off product lines in manufacturing processes. I worked with them for 40 odd years. They are installed in the lines between flange fittings to prevent product flow in the lines while doing maintenance or repair."
Sounds reasonable so I went ahead and added this to my answer.
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Yes, I recall, when working at Placid Refinery, Port Allen, La., those were used as blocks at flange fittings during maintenance operations. I initially thought they looked familiar.
Sonny
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    Posting from Rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
2599)    Well ... to me, the first part looks like a rolling mill     for grinding rain in the circle. The upward pointing end of the     right-angle piece of wood should fit into a hole in the center     stump and I guess that a person walks the axle around
    The other part looks like it might be for winnowing the grain.
2600)    O.K. This one I *know* -- though I have not seen one marked     and built quite like this.
    HEYCO makes strain reliefs for power cords an the like. Two     pieces of plastic (usually black, and sometimes tethered together     by a string of plastic). They have notches in the OD, and     distort the cord into a 'U' shape within the body of the relief.
    These pliers are designed to grip the two halves from the side     (thus the angled tips) and compress them to deform the power     cord enough so the two halves fit into a hole punched in the     chassis. When the pliers relax their grip, the two halve expand     a bit and grip the hole so it won't pull out.
    The metal 'U' around the pliers is to keep the jaw geared to the     handle to cover a specific range. You can move that to     disengage the gears to allow adjusting for larger or smaller     strain reliefs. Very useful tool. I have two, which I keep     set to common sizes in what I do. Mine have a nut which is     removed to allow the gear mesh between jaw and handle to be     shifted.
2601)    This one looks to me like part of a strain relief for running     telephone cables between the building and the pole. There should     be another part which slides into it or which is locked by the     center tabs to keep a grip.
2602)    For holding two things at a specific angle while they are glued     together.
    Or -- for holding steel cable in the shape of an eye while it is     being served to keep it in that form. Hmm ... the previous     object might be used as part of the serving.
2603)    Hog-scalding kettle -- for removing the bristles from the hide     of a hog prior to cutting it up for meat.
2604)    Dodging tools -- for holding back the exposure of some areas of     a photographic print, while the rest is allowed to darken more.
    Now to post and see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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On 7/6/12 12:36 AM, DoN. Nichols wrote:

http://www.southernmatters.com/sugarcane/operations-cashwell.htm
#6 shows a 60-gallon Columbus kettle used to scald hogs. It looks like a match.
#11 shows a 120-gallon used to boil cane juice. Kettles for this purpose appear thicker than the mystery item, probably to prevent hot spots.
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Is 2599 (the grinding stones) related, in some way, to 2603 (the large 5' kettle)? Both appear to be at the same museum, ie. the signs on the tree with the number 26, other grinding stones, and the fence construction in some areas.
Whatever is ground, by the stones, is placed into the kettle for cooking/processing? Other guesses: For grinding some wood/fibrous product, to make a resinous paste product or for making a texture product for better chinking of logs of a log cabin, for enhancing mortar for chimney making or for making a more solid (or waterproof?) flooring in cabins?
That museum looks like a nice interesting place to visit.
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I cheated and found the answer to #2599, the grinding stones. Here is someone's MySpace site with 90 pictures taken at the Museum of Appalachia, in Norris, Tn. http://www.myspace.com/harleyseduce/photos/4717286#%7B%22ImageId%22%3A4718574%7D
As for as that large kettle, I still believe its original purpose was for making syrup. It may have had a secondary use for scalding hogs, just as today the kettles, in my area, have a secondary use as lawn decor. You don't need 60 or 120 gallons of hot water to scald a hog, unless it was used at a slaughter house for scalding lots of hogs, hence the quantity of water needed was great, for the many hogs. Additionally, read the sign here: http://www.myspace.com/harleyseduce/photos/4717286#%7B%22ImageId%22%3A4717286%7D
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On 7/6/2012 12:40 PM, Mike Marlow wrote:

...
From that area, the most likely was for a molasses kettle...
<http://www.flickr.com/photos/dpuch/123609259/
I wasn't back for a while; I see the posting from the shots from somebody else from the Applachian Museum identified the crusher.
I wasn't absolutely positive it was the same one--when I was last there it hadn't gotten in such bad shape yet as indicated by the picture on the other link when it was still intact...the current state is sad to see... :(
It's been 15 yr now since we moved back to the farm from the time spent in TN and I suppose probably had been 10 since had done anything except go to the festival weekends and not wandered the grounds much while still there. We were located about 15 mi southwest...
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http://www.myspace.com/harleyseduce/photos/4717286#%7B%22ImageId%22%3A4718574%7D
http://www.myspace.com/harleyseduce/photos/4717286#%7B%22ImageId%22%3A4717286%7D
This museum had a couple of smaller kettles that were marked as being for scalding hogs, but this larger one was not for making syrup. Still no luck on the clamp but the rest of the answers have been posted:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2012/07/set-448.html#answers
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On Fri, 6 Jul 2012 17:00:17 -0400
<snip>

Think I got lucky ;-) Item #2602 seems to be a "Device for filling Pipe Joints".
Patent number: 948686 Date: Feb 8, 1910
http://www.google.com/patents?vid 8686
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
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Great job on finding the patent! I'll send this to the owner, I was guessing it was from the 1920s.
Rob
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    That is it! Even the patent date matches. :-)
    Enjoy,         Don.
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