What is it? Set 448

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This week's set has been posted:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Rob
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2602 could be a saw horse bracket. The legs go in the clamps and the end of cross piece drops in the slot.
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Rob H. wrote:

#2599 Part of a "Frisbee Golf" course?
#2600 Crimper, for attaching wires using insulated or non-insulated connectors.
#2603 Put grapes in it to make wine?
#2604 Hotplates (to rest a hot pan on a genteel table)?
Bill
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Bill wrote:

Scratch that guess, they are not big enough.
How about a "musical" purpose--percusive?
Bill
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Bill wrote:

How about they're used to get a stable place to put a pot or pan on an open fire ?
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Snag
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Bill wrote:

OOOps , that would be 2599 is a cane crushing device .
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Snag
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Nope, not cane crushing
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They aren't music related
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Actually part of a village type museum

Nope
These metal items are not related to cooking or hot pans.
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On 7/5/2012 4:50 PM, Rob H. wrote:

It's been long enough since I were in the areawas last there but that looks like could be John Rice Irwin's Museum of Appalachia in/near Clinton/Norris, TN. If so, I'm pretty sure I know it... :)
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Yes, that's the one
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On 7/5/2012 6:41 PM, Rob H. wrote: ...

OK, I'll let the regulars continue for a while then... :)
He was a kewl dude--if you took these pictures and aren't from there (I think you're somewhere in OH?) did you get to the Lenoir Museum just up the road towards Norris. Mr Lenoir was still alive for a number of years when we in the area. It was a treat to spend as much time as one had the leisure to take hearing all about his collecting and how he came to get any one item.
There are plenty of "mystery objects" there... :)
It's now part of the State of TN parks Dept at Norris Lake as he donated the entire collection to the State in return for the agreement to maintain it which they've done an admirable job thereof...
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Feel free to give the answer if you want.

I didn't know about the Lenoir Museum, next time I drive past Norris I'll stop in, sounds like an interesting place.
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2604 - used to block flow in pipes in chemical plants. We called them "pancakes.". Stick them in between flanges.
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2600: A Heyco bushing compression tool.. used to install power cord (or other cable) protective bushings in metal panels.
Heyco bushings are those plastic inserts installed around power cords to securely anchor them in metal panels of appliances and other equipment.
The cord is placed in the bushing shell and the tool is used to compress the bushing so the barbed body of the bushing can be inserted into the panel hole easily. When the tool is removed, the bushing expands slightly, gripping the edges of the panel hole to provide a secure mechanical attachment.
Despite the fairly simple design of the Heyco bushings, they're not easily installed or removed from a panel, particularly from the outside (power cord side) of an appliance.
Some Heyco bushings include additional strain relief features to promote reliability of the power cord/cable.
(a fairly easy puzzle since the company name is prominently displayed, this time).
--
WB
.........


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Thanks for the good description, I guess it was easy if you knew the answer but I did a search on the company name and didn't find an answer for this tool.
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I'm with WB on that one, its for installing cable locks/strain reliefs.
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Dennis wrote:

I've always used a medium sized pair of channel locks on Heycos.
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On Thu, 05 Jul 2012 22:51:16 -0400

Interesting comment Michael, that was my tool of choice for them too. And I fiddled with them pretty regular. Motorola used them to secure the microphone cords on their Maxar/Moxy model line and I replaced a lot of them... Used to be the smallest version (don't know if that is still true) made by Channel Lock. Worked quite well too :)
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Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
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Leon Fisk wrote:

These were about 8" long, and I would set them to one groove longer than parallel so that the Heyco would compress with little or no damage. I've done that on ones that ranged from 1/4" mounting hole, to ones that were over an inch in diameter.
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