What is it? Set 428

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All guesses.
2479 My first impression was a flashlight that attaches to a fishing pole (perhaps to see the pole bend while night fishing).
2480 The reamer and punch makes me think that it makes a hole in something hard, like metal. The knurled nut and terminal makes me think it has to be grounded sometimes, possibly for safety reasons (e.g., perhaps it might come in contact with live wires). Perhaps its used to make holes in an aluminum aircraft skin.
2481 Looks a lot like the tire bead-breaking tool that appeared in a previous "What is it?".
2482 Possibly a handle from a tap/die set.
2483 Possibly a multipurpose concrete dressing tool (trowel, pick to pry up old concrete, etc.).
2484 Possibly a soldering tip for a torch.
Carl G.
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2485 Chisel holder
2484 Marlin spike?
Cliff
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On 2/16/12 4:04 AM, Rob H. wrote:

2484 : Looks like an ultrasonic arrowhead. When the Seminole spotted white hunters encroaching on their game preserves, they would fire a whistling arrow over the heads of the game. Deaf to inaudible whistles, the hunters would tell other whites that there was no game. If not for the eternal vigilance of the Seminole, the Everglades Polar Bear might have been hunted to extinction.
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It's the grenade launcher sight for a Flugelhorn.
jsw
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Tire breaker, nut buster, splicing fid looks like the only three I'd guess on.
Steve
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    Posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
2479)    A flashlight made to clamp onto a rod and illuminate parallel     to that rod. (It looks too small to clamp onto most rifle     barrels), which can be turned on by pulling one pin, and off     perhaps by pulling the second pin?
    The pins need to be pulled at right angles to the rod to which     it is clamped.
    There are provisions for removing the socket for the     (prefocused) bulb. I at first though that it would allow     focusing -- but the bulb contains the only lenses, so there is     little you could do to the focus by sliding the lamp forward or     back.
2480)    It looks sort of like something designed to be screwed into a     tree trunk, and then to accept a candle on the straight spike     to illuminate a campsite or the like.
2481)    Obviously to compress something. From the shape of the foot     I suspect that it may be for compressing a shoe during some     stage of gluing.
2482)    A tool for aligning the front sight of a rifle, I think.
    Otherwise, it could be to slide over a piece with drilled radial     holes and to serve as a wrench to turn that with the handle     screwed into one of the holes.
2483)    Nasty looking thing.
    The handle is above the surface which the blade slides on.
    The corner appears to be to serve as a pivot for the blade.
    And the spike to discourage kibitzers? :-)
2484)    At first glance, it looks a bit like a dummy rifle round, for     testing the size of the chamber and the headspace, but the     supposed "bullet" is too small.
    So it is perhaps a decorative tip for a flagstaff, with a sharp     point to encourage the marcher ahead to keep up the pace.
    Now to post this, and then see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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2482, is a punch/chisel holder. here's the $nap-On equivalent:
<http://buy1.snapon.com/catalog/item.asp?search=true&item_IDc0624&PartN o=PPC5A&group_idg5272&supersede=&store=snapon-store&tool=all>
For the record, I have actually had one of these for eons now... got it back when my brother in law was a Snap-On dealer... more of a novelty than anything, and certainly not something to blow $40.00 on!
Only used it a time or two; the head part threads onto the threaded rod protruding from the handle, and even with the jam nut tightened, always seems to be coming loose. It's also big and hokey and nearly impossible to hit straight... especially when used with larger chisels... the one's you'd need it for the most.
Even with the little use I've given it, the red dipped plastic 'shock absorber' (I guess you'd call it) thing has already had it.
Erik
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On 2/16/12 4:04 AM, Rob H. wrote:

2480 I wonder if it's for protection against electrostatic discharge. Suppose you opened a metal box of blasting caps and needed to handle them to make connections. In an arid environment, could ESD set them off?
A timber in contact with the soil, such as a railroad tie, might be ideal because charges would drain slowly through the resistance of the wood. It looks as if the awl would make a hole big enough to insert the tapered pin, and the pin could be pushed in for a very firm connection.
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Sounds like a reasonable use for it, though I haven't been able to verify any of the guesses for this tool yet so I'm going to leave it unanswered for now, I think someone will recognize it eventually and provide us with the definitive answer.
The rest of them have all been identified this week:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2012/02/set-428.html#answers
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My wife is a licensed blaster. I've gone through all of her catalogs, and the old Dupont Blaster's Handbook, and I cannot find any such tool in the hundreds that have been available over the decades.
LLoyd
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On 2/17/12 5:41 PM, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

Did you see any ESD stuff? I think static is hazardous in the factory, but it may not be of concern in the field.
I'm trying to imagine an activity where one might need to drain charges through wood. Fueling? Operating an electronic instrument?
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email.me:

If it's an electrode for wood, at all, I'd more suspect is was for an earlier form of moisture sensor; but prudence would say it needed two electrodes of a certain length and spacing.
Lloyd
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email.me:

Forgot to answer this... there was a distinct lack of ESD hardware for blasters in the field.
Blasting caps are notoriously safe to handle (from the ESD perspective), so long as - if they're electrical - their leads are kept shunted until hooked up to properly terminated blasting machine.
From my own experience, I can say that fuse-style caps present little or no ESD danger potential. The active composition is deeply recessed inside the casing, leaving plenty of metal above for the crimp.
An 'ordinary' static spark would never reach that deep into the shell. It's usually metal, and the spark would jump to the shell lip first, thus acting like an ersatz Faraday Cage around the active composition. (which is, admittedly, usually a very sensitive metal fulminate or azide)
LLoyd
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