What is it? Set 427

Page 2 of 3  
On 2/14/12 9:32 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Functionally, I think it would be a disadvantage for an ink ball to be a full sphere or to come apart.
It has been suggested that this was a form to make medicine balls. Originally, they were only approximately round. They were sewed inside out like pincushions.
More recent medicine balls had polar caps, suggesting that they were sewn on forms. The caps I've seen are much too small to remove the four largest wedges of the mystery form. Small wedges were more important for making basketballs because it was important to remove them without cutting the reinforcing cords.
The four large wedges suggest to me that it may have been to make pinatas. You'd stick the stem in a hole in your bench, wax the wood, wrap it with paper mache, remove the top by cutting a latitude line larger than the Arctic Circle around the stem, remove the form, and use more paper mache to stick the top back on. A pinata didn't have to be strong like a basketball.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't know for sure how they make medicine balls, but I would guess they would sew the top half first, then flip it over to work on the bottom, when half of the bottom panels are complete they could pull out some wedges and rotate the leather, then continue in this manner until complete.

I figured that most round pinatas were made by using a balloon for support. We'll have to agree to disagree on this one, but if you find any sources on wood pinata forms I'd be happy to take a look at them.
Someone had told me that 8" was too small for a medicine ball but I found one that size on this page:
http://www.etsy.com/listing/85465782/fabulous-antique-leather-medicine-ball
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/15/12 8:07 AM, Rob H. wrote:

If you find any sources showing medicine balls being sewed on wooden forms, I'd be happy to look at them. Here's one from the 1950s: http://www.contextclothing.com/item.php?id 41 Even then, they weren't perfectly round. It seems to me it would have been much easier to sew without a form, especially if one used a sewing machine.
Balloons became available about 1889, for 4’ apiece, which would be $1 nowadays. Before that, what would they have used except wooden forms? Even after balloons were available, making dozens of pinatas for annual festivals would have been cheaper with wooden forms, and the wooden form would have made it easier to cut the pinata open to fill with candy.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You make some good points, I've been searching for pinata forms and medicine ball forms and have had the same luck with both, I'll let everyone know if find anything. Wouldn't surprise me if it turned out to be for a totally different purpose.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    Have you spelled it right in your searches? It really should be "piρata", which can be difficult to generate depending on your keyboard and computer OS, and in case it is not properly displayed on your computer, it is an 'n' with a '~' above it. Not sure how forgiving the search engines are about that.
    Good luck,         DoN.
--
Remove oil spill source from e-mail
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/16/12 11:05 PM, DoN. Nichols wrote:

http://www.ehow.com/info_7931025_papermache-mexican-folk-art-projects.html This page say Mexicans still use wooden forms to make table displays, wall displays, clowns, and angels. They mold the paper mache around the form, then cut the paper mache in two.
This page says wooden forms for paper mache are called takaan. http://creeksideartgallery.com/db/forsale.pl/13/wood_molds.html
This page says molding paper mache toys on wooden forms became very popular after American newspapers became available and declined when plastic toys arrived. http://www.artesdelasfilipinas.com/archives/6/paete-s-taka
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J Burns wrote:

I would bet that the wooden form is for sand molding the rough shape for a valve cavity. One of the local outfits uses nice aluminum ones now but wood is a LOT lighter and easier to work with for the previous generation.
--
Steve W.

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/14/2012 8:32 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Those aren't full round balls, they are for applying the ink to the plates. They are stuffed very firmly with wool and the skin is leather. I don't see any way that a wooden ball could work. I liked the pinata idea - the segmented wooden ball must be for taking it apart after some type of ball was formed.
--


___________________________________

Keep the whole world singing . . .
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No problem, if at some point in time you can send some photos, great, if you never get around to it that's fine too.

http://www.lds.org/Static%20Images/PlacesToVisit/feb19-upload/GrandinInterior7-Detail.jpg
I agree with Dan that the ink balls were stuffed with wool and were not solid wood.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

2478: Humidifier, fumigator and deodorizer?
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The first one is correct! I'll give a hint, it was for use on a farm.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
2474: Slave collar?
--
[dash dash space newline 4line sig]

Albi CNU
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/9/12 4:04 AM, Rob H. wrote:

2476 — How about a form for making pinatas? Marco Polo discovered them on his China trip. Nowadays, you might use a balloon for a form.
It looks as if you could make a paper-mache pinata up to 53 degrees north of the equator, like Dublin or Liverpool, and still get the wedges out after withdrawing the center piece. Then you could put in the goodies and attach a paper-mache cap. Perhaps this would be more rigid and could be filled fuller than if you made a pinata out of two hemispheres.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rob H. wrote:

2473 Tailpipe extension
2378 Hand warmer, cigar lighter, coffee warmer.
--
Gerald Ross

It IS as bad as you think, and they
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not technically correct but you're on the right track for one of the uses for this device.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

2478 Hen House heater?
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

2478 Maybe a humidifier? 2nd guess.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, otherwise known as a brooder

Correct, if it's too dry then egg shells can stick to hatching chicks.
One use for this device has still gone unanswered.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Art
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Egg candler is correct, the round part on the cover is made of mica and was probably a lot more clear when it was new.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.