What is it? Set 426

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I need some help with the second, fourth, and fifth ones this week:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Rob
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2467 I'll assume R is a coil. I'll also assume the terminals connect to a DC source. Third assumption is that the light bulb functions as a resistor. Then pulling out or pushing in the handle causes a square wave reversal of the current through the coil. A fourth assumption is that the oval hole in the coil is intended for the insertion of something. This leads to a guess that this is a demagnetizer. To magnetize something, there is no need for the reversal of the field. I'll cheat and make two more guesses... If connected to a telegraph line it could make a zzzipp sound when the handle is pulled. It could also cure a whole bunch of diseases.
2469 Guess: Aviator training goggles. To limit vision to instruments, and to provide experience with blind flying.
On 2/2/2012 4:01 AM, Rob H. wrote:

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AKA Foggles. I was thinking more along the lines of atomic sunglasses.
scott
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Didn't they issue that kind of thing to the folks who dropped the A-bombs over Japan?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
writes:

AKA Foggles. I was thinking more along the lines of atomic sunglasses.
scott
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I was thinking 2467 was a classroom demonstrator of inductance; the slide could create DC or alternating of voltage of any frequency at the coil, and the hole in the coil allowed for cores of different materials. The light bulb provided a visual indication of the current.
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On 2/2/12 6:25 AM, Alexander Thesoso wrote:

By golly, you're right! I imagined the square wave strip was a conductor, but it's the space between two metal combs.
Gustav Boettger of Milwaukee invented it in 1902. It's big enough to demagnetize a pocket watch without disassembly!
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Good answer! Demagnitizer is correct.
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Rob H. wrote:

2468 is for cleaning the ring grooves in pistons .
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Great! Looks like you nailed it, wasn't sure if I'd get an answer for this one. Thanks
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2471 is the catch from a mortise lock. Although, at 4 1/2" long it has a long backset. Paul K. Dickman

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On 2/2/12 9:05 AM, Paul K. Dickman wrote:

I KNEW I'd seen it somewhere!

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Now that you gave the answer it looks kind of obvious but I haven't seen too many disassembled locks so it was a mystery to me. I took the photo about three or four years ago so I was just guessing at the size, it might be a bit smaller than 4-1/2". Thanks
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I've seen plenty of these. Took me a moment, for the light bulb to come on.
As to the demagnetizer, my Dad used to have an AC powered one, which looks similar to the coil, no light bulb. Had a red push button for power. IIRC, if you put the metal in, and pulled the item slowly away, that demagnetized. Leave it in, and let off the button, and it was supposed to magnetize the metal. I never got much magnetic action out of any metal I tried.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Now that you gave the answer it looks kind of obvious but I haven't seen too many disassembled locks so it was a mystery to me. I took the photo about three or four years ago so I was just guessing at the size, it might be a bit smaller than 4-1/2". Thanks
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On 2/2/2012 4:01 AM, Rob H. wrote:

#2467 Wall lamp with dimmer (potentiometer?)?
#2470 For precise trimming. Roy Underhill showed an even nicer one on TWS, also made in Germany I believe, for trimming miters. Roy used it to help craft a picture frame.
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    Intersting set.
    Posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
2467)    This is a very intersting device. It is intended to be used     to demagnetize anything which will fit within the coil.
    Unlike most which I have seen, which were made to work from AC     power, this one works from a DC power source.
    The light bulb serves to limit the current through the coil,     especially while the slide is stationary.
    The long slide serves to periodically reverse the power to the     coil as it is drawn out.
    The object to be demagnetized is placed in the coil, and while     the slide is slowly drawn out, the object is similarly slowly     withdrawn from the coil, so it experiences progressively smaller     reversing magnetic fields, ending with very little at all.
    I don't know whether it is designed for low voltages (e.g. 6V or     12V from an automotive battery), or for the period when 110 VDC     was available from the wall outlet in some areas. Knowing the     data on the lamp screwed into the socket might give a clue,     assuming that it is original to the device, and not simply a     placeholder for one long lost or broken. (This appears to be in     a museum.)
2468)    Another weird one. The left arm looks broken, but closer     examination makes me think that it is not.
    It appears to be bronze, which is normally used where     non-sparking tools are needed, but the rotating blades look to     be hardened steel, so that lets that out.
    It sort of looks like a tool designed for removing a press-fit     lid with a groove around the rim (or at least at one place) as     is common on watch backs -- but it is rather large for most     watches. But I still think that it is some form of lid remover.
2469)    My first thought was that it was some form of welding goggles     but the velvet lining inside the caps says that they are not     transparent, so I would suggest that it is part of some     psychological experiment, to render someone totally free of     light, and then at the press of one of the control cones, to     suddenly expose the subject to whatever light level is present,     to see how long it takes him to adjust enough to see clearly.
    Given the angle of the cones, it appears to be set up for an     object to be viewed which is quite close to the face of the     subject.
2470)    Is that fourth photo the cutting blade? It looks more like     wood of some form, so I think not.
    If the blade were *very* sharp, I might think that it is some     form of microtome for producing very thin slices for examination     via a microscope.
    If instead it were a blade which would be good for wood, I would     think that it was to be used for slicing multi-colored pieces of     wood glued to form a pattern, and multiple slices are glued to     form a decorative pattern such as that around the sound hole in     a guitar.
2471)    The left hand end looks like something to grip the cast iron     lids from a wood-fired cooking stove. The other end might     work similarly in other places in the stove.
2472)    The dimension in the wood piece suggests that it is intended to     fit over the end of a piece of 2x4 lumber, which has not been     actually 2x4" for a long time, and has gotten smaller over the     decades.
    What it is intended to *do* to the lumber, however, is not clear     to me. Perhaps cut a groove across the short dimension.
    Now to post this and see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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2467, a very nicely made "whatever" it might be. 2468, some kind of spanner or adjuster? 2469, eye glasses for a bug eyed monster 2470, slicer for USFDA free give away cheese? 2471, as a locksmith with 25+++ years experience, I can comment with 100% assurance. This is a spring latch from a full mortise lockset. I have others in my care, and can send you pictures of them. See the rectangle shape hole in the center with a tab? The tab inside the rectangle goes over the end of the compression spring that exends the latch. See the yoke and tabs in the upper left? These engage the piece that goes over the spindle. I'll email you pictures of such a device in action, if you wish. And, if I can find a mortise lockset to pull apart. 2472, I return to my previous state of complete ignorance. Totally no clue. My humor guess is that's a belt pedometer for a coin counter person at a casino. Got to at least make a SWAG.
And, finally, you send one which I know. Had to happen eventually.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I need some help with the second, fourth, and fifth ones this week:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Rob
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If you have time to take some photos and send them to me I would appreciate it. One of the guys brought this to a tool collectors meeting a few years ago, no one knew what it was so I guess that proves there weren't any locksmiths in attendance. I'll pass your description on to the owner, I'm sure he'll be happy to finally get an answer for it.
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As you wish. Will be a day or two, remind me if you havn't heard in a couple days.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
If you have time to take some photos and send them to me I would appreciate it. One of the guys brought this to a tool collectors meeting a few years ago, no one knew what it was so I guess that proves there weren't any locksmiths in attendance. I'll pass your description on to the owner, I'm sure he'll be happy to finally get an answer for it.
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2470. Device my grandmother used to cut cake. She could feed a wedding party of 300 with just one cupcake. Art
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On 2/2/12 4:01 AM, Rob H. wrote:

2469: 19th Century Masonic hoodwinks. During initiations, they wanted candidates to walk in the dark for the psychological effect. It was easier to put hoodwinks on them than to make the room completely dark.
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