What is it? Set 414

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I need some help with three of the items this week:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Rob
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2400. Magdeburg Hemisphere to demonstrate vacuum. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magdeburg_hemispheres Karl
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On 11/10/2011 5:13 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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<:3 )~

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On 11/10/11 5:13 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

2397: How about a chock? The 16" handle means the cart guy doesn't have to stoop as far to jam the point under the wheel, and the small part has a "sole" of a material to keep it from sliding on a particular surface.
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2397. I think it's primary purpose is to move/adjust a heavy object sideways. The pivoting shoe indicates this to me. But move what?? Art
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wrote:

Kind of hard to guess the purpose of this one so I'll give a hint, it was used on trains.
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Rob H. wrote:

Looks small to be an inching bar.
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Steve W.

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Probably should have said it was used inside of a train.
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On 11/10/11 7:06 PM, Rob H. wrote:

Porters used different kinds of carts. If a crate or trunk was hard to lift because of weight or the lack of handles, perhaps such a lever could raise it enough to get it on or off a cart.
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    On trains, or on the rails on which they rode? I could see it being used either to align the rails themselves, or the wooden ties on which they rested.
    Or -- on trains, perhaps it could be used as a chock to keep a car from rolling -- especially depending on the coefficient of friction between the fulcrum and the rail top.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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2396: Not sure of the intended purpose of this particular multi function hammer/hatchet device... however an OT thought:
It's my personal observation that the more 'things' a device does, the less 'things' it will do well.
Largely holds true for people too...
Erik
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2396 I agree with Mouse, it looks like some sort of shingler's tool.
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2396 I agree with Mouse, it looks like some sort of shingler's tool.
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Rob H. wrote:

2395 -
2396 - Looks like an old roofers hammer.
2397 - Old version of a door lifter?
2398 -
2399 - Looks like an umbrella stand.
2400 - Already answered.
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2397 This is interesting. It is obviously a lever, but... It is very robustly built, but only has a 2:1 mechanical advantage. There is no way a person, even jumping on the long end, could apply enough force to justify the robustness. I'll guess this is a tool used by a rigger, or possibly a stone worker/setter. Probably used in confined spaces. Another lever or jack may be used to apply force to the long end.
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On 11/10/2011 12:40 PM, Alexander Thesoso wrote:

Handmade for purpose, it would appear. It's not been abused enough for stone work unless it was only used one time in its life. I don't think the size looks at all out of place for a handmade piece--but a 200-lb guy's foot on the back end would put a pretty decent lift on the other...
The thickness of the working end means it had to have plenty of clearance under whatever was being lifted. The thickness of the fulcrum and the flat end means it wouldn't have worked for doors although that was my first thinking, too, unless there was a heckuva gap under one.
A built-for-specific-job tool methinks, but I've no clue precisely what...
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    Perhaps for uncoupling cars from the train (using US style couplings)? I would not call this "inside" a train, however, so I may be wrong.
    Is the material wood or steel? it is kind of hard to tell.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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It's made of wood but has a metal plate at the end.
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"Alexander Thesoso"

It could be a tool to move ore cars in a mine.
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On 11/10/11 1:19 PM, Steve W. wrote:

an inch or less in diameter. I think it was for up to a dozen walking sticks: eight below and four above.
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