What is it? Set 409

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Back to the usual schedule this week:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Rob
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wrote:

1365 is a sonic remote control for a TV
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2365 is a television remote (probably Zenith) that used tuning forks for the transmitting elements.
2369 is what they call in these parts "A SAHREEN" It's fer lettin' y'know the FAR INJUN is comin'. It runs offn' one-a the TARS.
Lloyd
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You're right about it being a siren, though I'm not sure if it's belt driven or runs off of a tire as you say.
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2365 Early TV remote control 2366 The mass of steel at the end would suggest it was meant to retain heat. I'm guessing it was used to flatten out a strip of something - leather or fabric. So it's a hand-held belt iron. 2367 Train wheel 2368 The cap on the ball chain is throwing me. Not sure why there'd be a need to cover a three jaw chuck. 2369 How big is it? 2370 Hedge clipper
R
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Correct
I forgot to add that to the post, it's 6" diameter

Nailed it
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wrote:

Set 409 2365: remote control for TV. 1950s or 1960s. Sonic (in other words, not light or radio)

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Mark F wrote the following:

My ex-FIL had one of these for a Zenith back in the early 70s. You had to aim the remote precisely at the receiver on the TV for it to work. I don't know how it worked, but in the late afternoon, the Sun streamed through the window onto the front of the TV. When that happened, the remote did not work.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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That's odd! The "clicker" version of "Space Command" controls comprised a set of spring-loaded hammers striking tuned metal rods (like tuning forks).
The TV had a set of LC tuned circuits to discriminate the different frequencies, and move the "clunker" motor or the volume control, or the on/off switch. That Zenith set was the first one I remember that, like modern electronics, was never really "off"; they just turned off the non- essential supplies, but kept the tuning fork "listener" on all the time.
Of course, without PLL circuitry for the vertical and horizontal sweep circuits, you still had to get up and down a lot to "tune", unless you had strong, clean signals without multipath interference.
Early "bang-bang" RC model airplane radios used essentially the same method, but generated the tones electronically, rather than banging on metal rods <G>.
LLoyd
LLoyd
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On 2011-10-07, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote:

    I agree. Unless there was an IR version back then -- or even a visible red LED version. Visible red ones apparently started in 1962, so it is possible -- and they might have used the same case for both styles of clickers.
    And the IR ones in 1961 -- all according to Wikipedia.
    Or -- it is possible that the afternoon sun heated the circuits up enough to switch the frequencies which they responded to, so they could not "hear" the tones.

    Hmm ... and Zenith was the actual TV which Heathkit provided in kit form IIRC.

    Since the RC airplane was typically too far away for an acoustic remote to work anyway. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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wrote:

My favorite trick at that time was to walk into the room shaking my ring of keys. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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Or drop change on a bar while the football game was on. ...but don't expect to be served after.
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On Sat, 8 Oct 2011 18:33:32 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

Particularly in this part of the country.
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Rob H. wrote:

2365 - Got the TV that goes with it ??? (it's an antique sonic remote control AKA clicker)
2366 - Looks similar to a pleating iron.
2367 - Foundry cart wheel?
2368 -
2369 - Old mechanical siren?
2370 - Expandable serving tray?
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2365 An old "Clicker" television remote. 2367 Looks like a rail car wheel. 2368 For pop rivets?
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Before I look at the other guesses I actually have an idea about a few of these...
2365-TV remote with volume up/down and channel up/down
2366-looks like something used for heating the glue stip when bonding carpet edges together
2367-wheel from a railroad car
2368-rivet gun
2369-looks like it could be from some type of braking mechanism
2370-no idea
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    Posting from Rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
2365)    And old acoustic (ultrasonic) remote control for a TV.
    Instead of the pulses of IR LEDs of modern ones. Each button     generates a different tone, which is recognized by the TV     receiver.
    It probably drove small dogs and bats nuts. :-)
2366)    One end appears to be for smoothing some substance -- perhaps     printer's ink, perhaps something else.
    The other end is a screwdriver -- probably for maintaining     whatever it is used with (again. likely a printing press).
2367)    Looks like a flanged wheel for either a railroad train or a     rail-based streetcar. At 34", I suspect that it could be     either.
    It does not look like the normal mounting to the axle, however.     Perhaps something to make it serve as a decorative table.
2368)    Looks like a tool for installing pop-rivets -- but missing the     cap which the head presses against while the jaws grip and pull     the pop shank.
2369)    Various possibilities come to mind.
    a)    A siren -- with air flowing in through the holes around         the rubber pulley shown in the first shot, and exiting         through the radial holes chopped on and off as a rotor         turns inside the housing.
    b)    Perhaps some kind of centrifugal pump.
        The spring loaded arm looks intended to absorb lots of         torque -- which could occur when starting the siren, or         when pumping liquid against a head.
2370)    Now -- if there were pointers at the ends, or holes through the     rivets in the side opposite the handles, I would think that it     was something like a rivet layout fan for equally spacing rivets     in aircraft skin work.
    But since it does not match those features, and from the wear     marks on the blades, it looks more like something to trim grass     to a fixed height by opening and closing it over the grass.
    Now to post this and see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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2367- I have no idea why a Griffin chilled wheel manufactured 3 years after the companies founding is significant...
http://www.amstedrail.com/About/History.aspx
Perhaps the date is significant and it is a commemorative wheel? Oct 27 1880 is the day Teddy Roosevelt got married...
Dave
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Oh and 2368, not sure all the possible descriptions match with the fact it releases when squeezed.
Dave
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Hard to tell from the pictures but compressing the handles makes the end close for crimping.
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