What is it? Set 397

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A new set has been posted on the site:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Rob
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2294. Folding post level. here's a modern one. (Amazon.com product link shortened) Karl
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Good answer, according to the patent the one on my site was for use by surveyors.
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They're using it to level a surveyors rod. You can see a modern rod bubble level here. http://www.engineersupply.com/crain-rod-level-vial-item-91255-works-with-25-foot-crain-svr-series-rod-only.aspx Karl
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On 7/14/11 6:56 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

breech loader. Pull it from breech to muzzle with a cord, back to the breech with another cord, rotate to catch the next groove, and pull again.
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On 7/14/11 6:56 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

2293: The first has a grove that might guide a drill bit. The second and third have pointed screws that could, like center punch, start holes a certain distance from the end of a shaft. I wonder if they were for boring lynch-pin holes in wooden axles.
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J Burns wrote:

2293: A tension hook for a drum.
Bill
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    Posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
2293)    These look like clamps to keep a window closed against     break-in attempts from the outside.
    Jimmy-proof, compared to many of the normal sash locks,     especially ones from that period (based on the finish).
2294)    Interesting -- a pair of level vials in a hinge, with     provisions for securing it to two pieces of wood (or metal) with     screws.
    It does not look as though it would set level on a surface when     opened to 90 degrees without attaching to something else.
    The brand is associated in my mind mostly with drafting     instruments, but I believe that they are also associated with     surveying instruments.
    I suspect that it is to be used in combination with a similar     hinge without the levels, but I'm not quite sure where they     would be used.
2295)    South Bend I associate with machine tools -- especially lathes,     though they made other machine tools as well.
    It looks as though it is shaped to accept a Morse taper (perhaps     a headstock spindle taper, as it looks a little large for the     typical tailstock taper. Perhaps for storing the spindle taper     adaptor which allows the use of a smaller taper in the     headstock. (And, I think, the South Bend machines used their     own proprietary taper in the headstock spindle, not truly a     Morse taper.)
    But while the slot in the handle would allow it to be bolted to     some convenient location, the handle also looks indented to     accept the fingers when holding it in a hand.
    If it were not for the South Bend name and the lack of a     threaded socket in place of the handle, I would suggest that it     looks like a holder for a microphone.
2296)    Hmm ... perhaps an early parking meter? The coin feeder     on the side, the crank on the other side, and the two numbered     wheels -- perhaps tens and units of time remaining -- or perhaps     white for minutes remaining, and red for minutes expired?
    Red light for time expired? (Suggests power fed in through the     pipe supporting it.)
    I see part of a lock hanging from the red cylinder on the front,     which I would guess is access to the coin storage.
2297)    Looks like a rather nicely made ferrule crimper for three     different sizes of ferrules. The largest is closest to the     hinge points, which gives the most leverage to the hardest to     crimp.
    Since it appears to be made of brass or bronze, I would guess     that it is made non-sparking to use in the presence of flamable     gasses, perhaps hydrogen, for crimping ferrules on gas hoses to     secure them onto barbed fittings.
2298)    I would guess that a pull on the lower ring retracts the     three points.
    Perhaps it is some weird form of fishhook (perhaps for something     like eels or other uncommon water denizens, and pulling on the     lower ring allows it to be removed from the critter in     question.
    Now to post this and look to see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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This tool is actually food related and is also associated with a recreational activity.

Could be, I don't know the answer for this one, I thought it might be a gambling device but that's just a guess, though I don't understand why it has a push coin slot on the side and another coin slot in the red cylinder on the front.

This tool is also food related.
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Rob H. wrote:

I thought it could be a parking meter too. The 2 coin slots and "clocks" would allow it to serve 2 parking spots. Put in a coin and wind up your timer?
Bill
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Bill wrote:

other. And what's that red vertical tube-looking thing?
Thanks, Rich
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I shot the photo of this device while touring a very old building that used to be a brewery. The tour guide guessed that it could be a barrel counter but I don't buy that since it has coin slots.
Here are the answers for this week:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2011/07/set-397.html#answers
Rob
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this is way too late, Rob, but I think I know what it is, although I don't have a clue how it interfaced to "the rest of the story".
It now (kind of) looks to me like it was a coin-operated 'settable' air dispensor for filling tires. Even the setting it was left at would sort of agree with that (27 psi?)
I didn't see anything else on it that would indicate air in or air out, but it looks similar to the old Air-Flator thingy's at gas stations, only more primitive. They didn't have a lot of visible in/out stuff either, except for the hose hanger hook on the front -- the outlets were on the back.
LLoyd
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Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

I noticed there are 4 screws missing from the top, so I think we're not seeing the whole thing. Maybe it was a scale? Or a light?
I can't buy the 27 psi suggested by Lloyd as there was adequate room for BOTH the 2 and the 7 right above the coin input device.
Clearly another torture device. ; )
Bill

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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote in message

However, it appears to me that the red tube thing on the front has a padlock at the bottom so it is likely that it secures the coin bin and the slot at the top is not a coin slot per se. Art
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You might be right about the slot not being for coins, the image at the link below is a close-up of the red cylinder, it appears to be locked in place by the padlock and the two metal strips on the front. I don't see how it could be securing the coin bin which would be inside of the box. The slot doesn't look like it enters the cylinder as I first thought, if it did I think it would be darker, the red seen in the slot looks more like a red cap on top of the cylinder, although I used a flash so maybe it lit up the interior.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/Album%2012/pic2296n.jpg
I sent an email asking them to take a look at the back to see if there are any clues, I'll post their reply if I get one.
Rob
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On 7/15/11 7:00 PM, Rob H. wrote:

for approximately 100 Morgan silver dollars. They would weigh nearly six pounds, which a potential gambler could heft by sliding the cylinder up and down. At a time and place where large silver coins were used, this may have been a good way of enticing people to try their luck.
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I did some searching on this idea but didn't have any luck, I'd like this theory more if the two number dials were side by side instead of one on top of the other. Hopefully I'll hear back from my email to the tour guide and we'll see if he confirms whether it could be part of an air compressor or not.
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I find it interesting that the numbers on the side correspond to the numbers on the red and white dials. If it *is* an air pump, you wouldn't have two dials, you'd most likely have a knob on the front. Also - was it tilting? I just noticed the way it is sitting in relation to the bricks in the wall behind it.

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Yes, it was tilting but I'm not sure if that's from an uneven surface or some other reason, it was in an old run down building so it could have been sitting on small pieces of debris.
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