What is it? Set 383

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On 4/7/11 4:38 PM, Sonny wrote:

2210 - I like that better than my first idea. A counterweight rolling on an inclined plane in greased tracks. If the weight is 1500 pounds and the thing to be lifted (perhaps a gate) weighs 500, it will balance with an incline of 19.5 degrees. You need only to overcome friction to raise or lower the gate.
I imagine it would roll in greased grooves and the cable would be attached to a greased fitting over the red bulge. The hole might be for automatic lubrication.
I see several advantages compared to a hanging counterweight.
1. It's out of the way.
2. Behind the normal range of motion, the tracks could curve up to arrest the motion of the weight instead of letting it crash into anything if the cable breaks.
3. The cable would bend 110 degrees instead of 180, meaning, with a given pulley diameter, less friction loss, less cable wear, and less strain on the pulley.
4. More inertia than a 500-pound hanging weight, so that it will move slowly and if the worker gets the gate moving, it will tend to open or close all the way.
5. Easier and safer to service than a hanging weight.
If it was attached to a fire escape and slightly overbalanced the weight of the ladder, the ladder would swing down fairly slowly when somebody descended. A "dip" at the top of the inclined plane would hold the counterweight so that once down, the ladder would stay down.
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On 4/7/11 4:38 PM, Sonny wrote:

2210 - Without a cable, it could be a shifting weight for a seesaw system weighing several tons perhaps a ramp.
Suppose it takes 50 foot-tons to lift the ramp and when the ramp is down, the fixed counterweight supplies 45. If the rolling weight is 2 feet from the pivot, it will supply 1.5 foot-tons, so 3.5 foot-tons (50 - 46.5) will hold the ramp securely down.
Suppose the rolling weight is on tracks that are inclined slightly toward the pivot. When you start to lift the ramp, the tracks tilt slightly away from the pivot. If the weight rolls 8 feet, it will be 10 feet from the pivot and supply 7.5 foot-tons, for a total of 52.5. Now 2.5 foot-tons will lift the ramp and hold it securely up.
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2209 ? 2210 shipping land mines? 2211 hub cap remover / re-installer? 2212 home made duck bills? 2213 I already saw the correct answer. So I will guess spaghetti portion tool and cutter. 8>) 2214 ? (my daughter thinks its a pizza cutter)
On 04/07/2011 05:36 AM, Rob H. wrote:

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    Posting from Rec.crafts.metalworking as always:
2209a,b,c)    Looks like a tool for moving part of a wood stove     or perhaps shaking the grate to clean it out in a     coal-fired furnace.
2210)    Looks like as serious weight lifting barbell -- except     that the center bar seems too short to allow the lifter     to get both hands on it at the same time, and at that weight,     one would hardly expect to lift it with only one hand. (But, it     is rather difficult to judge the separation of the weights from     the overall length of seven feet.
2211)    This showed up before in Rec.crafts.metalworking, and I believe     that it was identified as a tool for driving oakum into the     slots between boards on a ship's hull.
2212)    Some sort of crimping tool -- though not right for either     electrical or hydraulic hose crimps, so I'm not sure what it     really is. The part number sort of looks like what Ma Bell put     on tools issued to its workers.
2213)    *This* one I know quite well. I used to have one. It is the     tool for adjusting the tension in bicycle spokes by turning the     nipples out at the rim. This one is missing one thing which     mine had -- the zinc anti-rust coating. Looks as though someone     found it covered by rust, and wire-brushed it to death.
2214)    Not at all sure what this is -- unless it is mounted on a wall     by some hidden part, and both projections move as clock hands
    Now to see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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16"-18" assuming the floor tiles are 12" squares
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It's 7 feet long.Tiles have to be 2 feet.
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2 x 12" black, 2 x 12" white, 2 x 12" black, etc... - see larger pix for 'join lines' between tiles of the same colour
I can see them on the white areas anyway, they're a bit harder to see on the black tiles with my eyes but would assume they're the same size <g>
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2214 - a nocturnal.
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Correct, a nocturnal dial is a star clock that uses the north star and the big dipper to tell the time.
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2209 Door Stop or a hanger used on a peg board
2210 counter weight for a drawbridge or crane
2211 used for caulking ships.
2212 needle nose pliers
2213 bike spoke tool
2214 compass
Robert
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Rob H. wrote:

I am the owner of 2211 and when I started to try and find out what it is I researched caulking tool and found many pictures and descriptions shapes and sizes and of caulking tools none of which described my thing so I rejected that line of inquiry.It came from someone who worked in the railway (which probably has no bearing)
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I think it might be for a rubber seal, as around a window; it doesn't look like it's for marine use.
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One of my friends sent me this photo of a wagon pin that is about the same size and shape, it's probably for hold the back gate flap up:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/Album%2012/pic2211c.jpg
It's the closest that I've seen for 2211, don't know if the railroads ever used pins for a similar purpose or not.
Rob
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On 4/8/11 5:04 AM, Rob H. wrote:

Pins for pickup-truck tailgates are on chains so they don't get lost. 2211 lacks a loop to fasten a cord or chain. Why would a wagon pin need a sort of screwdriver tip and a head that's a bit like a claw hammer?
What about rattan? It's very durable if maintained, but how do you weave in a replacement strand of rigid material?
I'd soak the furniture or basket and the replacement strand. Where the replacement had to pass under a strand, I'd pry the strand with the flat tip until I could get the hooked corner of the head under it. Using my index finger to hold the strand on the hook, I'd roll the tool like a claw hammer, lifting the strand until I could slide the replacement under it.
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Sounds like that would work, though I did a search and didn't see any similar rattan tools. I think the wagon pin idea is just an outside possibility and posted it because it's the closest that I've seen to 2211. Hopefully someone will provide an answer for it sooner or later.
Rob
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I think it's a gimlet style reeding tool, for forcing in the retainer reeds in cane-seat chairs.
LLoyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote in message

I just posted all eight of the guesses for this tool, and did some searching but didn't find proof for any of them.
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2011/04/set-383.html#answers
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