What is it? Set 373

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Guesses:
2149: Frame from a "Grandfather clock" (with a pendulum)
2154: My guess is that the ends are mostly there to help protect the long thin thing(s) in the cylindrical part--say, during transport. It appears sort of in the style of a musical instrument case--which makes more sense than a shipping case due to the absence of a lock. So my final guess is that it contains an instrument--perhaps one for engineering, like a LEVEL, where accuracy is a virtue.
Bill
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The two items in number 2149 were for use on a farm.
Rob
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2154. A case for a Tesla coil.
R
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I think this is probably correct. One odd thing about the case, I don't remember seeing a handle on it.
Rob
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A couple of questions:
Have tesla coils ever been manufactured commercially / in volume?
Would someone bother to make such a nice case for a one off tesla coil?
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I would tend to doubt it, particularly if your definition of volume was more than a few dozen.

I doubt it. But you're making quite a jump from "commercially in volume" to "one off". For a small unit like that I'd imagine it was used in scientific demonstrations in school settings, and inventor/ research labs. And maybe guys who were working on the development of their Ming The Merciless Death Ray. In portable form. ;) http://www.rmcybernetics.com/projects/DIY_Devices/plasma-gun.htm
Cases like the one pictured were the equivalent of a blow-molded case today. Now they're considered really good cases and of exceptional quality, but back then they made them for everything.
Anyway, the Tesla coil was a guess, and I don't see how it could be verified without actually having a picture of one with the coil inside it.
R
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http://www.scientificsonline.com/50000-volt-tesla-coil-with-experiment-book.html http://www.amazing1.com/tesla.htm
People make nice one-off furniture. ;-)
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" snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz" wrote:

http://www.scientificsonline.com/50000-volt-tesla-coil-with-experiment-book.html
But you have to chose the people VERY carefully, and examine them closely for defects if you want nice furniture! ;-)
--
You can't fix stupid. You can't even put a band-aid on it, because it's
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On Sat, 29 Jan 2011 15:02:10 -0500, "Michael A. Terrell"

**IT'S PEOPLE!!!!**
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RicodJour wrote:

The proportions are all wrong for any practical Tesla coil I've ever seen pix of. The post is too skinny, and what's with the big top hat?
Thanks, Rich
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On 1/29/11 4:52 PM, Rich Grise wrote:

It's the 19th Century. You walk into a political caucus. The absence of footprints in the fresh snow has told you that nobody has stepped out for fresh air because it's very cold and nobody wants members to suffer frostbite.
A boss spots your case, rushes over, slaps you on the back, and invites you to the smoke-filled room in back. As he leads you across the floor, others join you. Your reputation has preceded you.
You set up your invention and they stand in a circle gushing praise. They agree that you will be the next President of the United States. They don't shake hands but are definitely relieved to conclude their business.
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2152 looks like an early version of a unicorn log splitter.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N1HZztie5ac

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2152 looks like a tool to remove close nipples from pipe.
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This is an update on the blue and red electrical device from last week, the owner of it cut it open to see what was inside, see below for what was found.
Here is the original photo from last week:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/Album%2012/pic2145.jpg
Two shots of the device after it was opened:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/Album%2012/pic2145na.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/Album%2012/pic2145nn.jpg
The owner's description:
1. The terminals come into the case through some white insulating kind of plastic. 2. The exterior case is copper. 3. The terminals connect to two steel rods. They appear to be precisely ground to size. 4. The two steel rods were separated by two pieces of glass (insulators?) 5. The two steel rods had blocs of carbon on the outside. 6. Two larger pieces of carbon were on the top and bottom of the above. 7. The entire assembly was wrapped in ordinary masking tape (no insulation there!) 8. The space between the assembly wrapped in masking tape and the outer copper shell was filled with powered carbon.
I still don't know what it was! If it weren't for the carbon (which is conductive) I would think some kind of a capacitor. Perhaps I am wrong about the solid carbon and the powdered carbon being carbon... but it sure looks like it to me! Sure made a mess in my shop.
-----
Anyone have an answer for it?
Rob
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Rob H. wrote:

If it was carbon I would say some form of resistor. Maybe a large audio dummy load or carbon pile load for testing power supplies or RF equipment. It would be non inductive and well shielded.
--
Steve W.

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Amen, and again! That's a dummy load. But not for long use, with that case and no cooling apparatus.
LLoyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote in message

Thanks guys, the owner of the device thinks that this is probably correct.
He had a few more questions on it:
- Why a copper case? - Why are the input terminals red and black; they're both the same? - Why an inner core of carbon block and an outer core of carbon powder. - Why no markings of any kind? (could be a paper label which came off at some time.) Somebody suggested the copper case was possibly an RF shield, which sounds good except it's not grounded to anything!
Rob
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Rob H. wrote:

RF shielding and easy to form.

They usually come as a set of B&R.

Carbon block for better voltage control, carbon powder because it's cheaper and easier to fill the container rather than machining an entire block.

If it's a kit or home built item the owner knew what it was, why label it. Plus it looks like it had been repainted, there could have been printing on the original paint.

Doesn't really require it for a dummy load.
--
Steve W.

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    [ ... ]

    Shielding -- keep the signal inside -- or keep an external signal from getting in.

    Commonly supplied in colored pairs, as they are commonly used for speaker outputs on amplifiers. You can buy them all in one color, or in mounted pairs or whatever, but the most readily available are in red/black pairs. Aside from the red and black, in good quality ones, such as those by Greyhill, I also have some green and blue ones.
    Here is what Graywhill's binding posts look like:
<http://www.grayhill.com/web1/TABproducts.asp?SolutionCatID66&LevelID=3&TabID=1
note that tehy come either with individual panel insulators, or ones which hold two at the standard 3/4" spacing. (For that matter, I know that they at least once had triangular patterns of three as well. Downloading the data sheet, I no longer see the triangular three post base insulator. But these were perhaps twenty years ago. :-)
    From other makers, I have also seen yellow and white ones.
    Others, once made by General Radio, were available in three colors -- red, black, and bare metal. The latter was used as a ground, the black was often right next to it with a sliding link to allow grounding it or not at need, and the third was red, which was the hot side.
    But these look like the poor quality ones which were once sold by Radio Shack -- and those would have been sold with the assumption that they would be used as speaker terminals, thus the red and black pairs. Radio Shack also offers (at least on their web site) some better quality ones as well.
    I just went searching on Radio Shack's web page, and found this (among others):
    <http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId !03984>
These look very much like the ones which were in the device under discussion. They are sold in packs of two pairs -- two red and two black.

    Perhaps to even out clumping? Was there no carbon powder in contact with the rods?
    Note that carbon granule microphones in use tended to clump, and had to be bumped to break up the clumps. Think of the old telephones (which used carbon granule microphones), and how occasionally they would produce weak sound. If you bumped the microphone end of the handset against a table it would break up the clumping and improve the sound level.

    Could be -- or if it was unique -- or one of only a few, the distinctive color pattern could explain what it was to those who were presumed to need to know. :-)

    A complete copper shield does not have to be grounded to block RF. It can be advantageous to ground it if you want to control buildup of static voltages, of course.
    Or -- it could be that there was a connection from the black binding post to the copper case -- which would serve as the requested reason for the two colors.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Rob H. wrote:

It might have been some type of vibration sensor or a form of microphone,
John
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