What is it? Set 371

Page 1 of 3  
Another set has just been posted:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2011/01/set-371.html
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

2137) Lumberjacks pound it into a tree to make a foothold. 2138) A retractible button. Press the back, and it seats smoothly on the fabric 2139) A handle for lifting grill plates on a woodstove 2140) A wool carding thingy. Or maybe a mole trap 2141) Tent stakes 2142) A turnbuckle for pulling two sheets of heavy canvas tight. The feet on the ends went into little 'buttonholes' in the canvas, then the handle was twisted.
Now to see if any of my wild guesses were even close to right.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/13/2011 6:57 PM, Rob H. wrote:

2137 Blacksmiths anvil stakes they fit into the Hardy hole on an anvil.
2138 coin carrier fo sixpences , the sixpences fit into the back and are held in the item by the spring
2139 stove plate handel
2140 carpet stretcher
2141 meat scewers
2142 turn buckle of some description ,no idea what it would be used for.
--
Kevin (Bluey)
"I'm not young enough to know everything."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It isn't an anvil stake but the work 'anvil' is part of the two word answer.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rob H. wrote:

2137 Flattening metal by hand? Place a handle over the tang and pound til your hearts content? (I'm convinced it's the convex end that is the important feature--I didn't notice it until the 2nd picture).
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's not missing a handle but it is for flattening a particular piece of metal although not as described above. Actually, the word 'flattening' isn't the best word to use here, that is essentially what it does but there is better word for what happens when this tool is used.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
re:2137

Is this a sheet metal dolly of some kind?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote: re:2137

Is this a sheet metal dolly of some kind?
That's not it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rob H. wrote:

...
Unless I'm sorely mistaken, its purpose is to broach square holes in hot plate. One holds it w/ tongs along the grooved sides and whacks the large end away from the pointy one...there's a similar one in the collection of grandfather's old blacksmithing tools and I recall making holes for carriage bolt heads for some hand-manufactured farm implements when I was a kid lo! those many moons ago.
Now there may be some other usage that could be made of it as well, but I'm venturing that's the original purpose...
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nope. It would have been used by a farmer.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rob H. wrote: ...

...
Grampa _was_ a farmer... :)
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rob H. wrote:

Ive one here, its for sharpening a cythe or cikle by hammering the edge of the tool to thin it to a razor edge. Its set into a log or piece of wood.
Ive seen them used in Switzerland. Ted Dorset UK
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Correct! It's a scythe anvil used for peening the blade with a hammer.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/13/11 11:47 AM, Rob H. wrote:

Is it a stake anvil? You might drill a pilot hole in a stump to prevent splitting. Forging could be called flattening. I imagine it could be used to flatten bent implements, too.
It was probably invented to tenderize beefstakes!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Rob H." wrote in message

It's not missing a handle but it is for flattening a particular piece of metal although not as described above. Actually, the word 'flattening' isn't the best word to use here, that is essentially what it does but there is better word for what happens when this tool is used.
Rob
Not like ones I have used, but probably a "flatter"
Steve R.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/13/2011 10:39 AM, Rob H. wrote:

Looks like a saw anvil. Pound it into a tree stump and use it to set the teeth of a logging saw.
Kevin Gallimore
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Very close, you're right about it being pounded into a tree stump, but it wasn't for saws.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sickles?
--
Dave Baker



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

2137: blacksmiths anvil piece
2138: you got me
2139: wood combustion stove firebox plate lifter
2140:
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
2140 I've seen a similar tool used to separate fibrous material (flax, papyrus, hemp). The worker takes a handful of fibrous stalks, slaps it down on the comb and pulls. Repeatedly.
2142 This looks like a tool for repairing cracked stone blocks. Stick the flat surfaces to either side of the crack, with a removable cement. Clean the crack and fill with a permanent cement. Pull the crack closed. When the permanent cement has set, knock off the tool and clean the surface.
On 1/13/2011 4:27 AM, Rob H. wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.