What is it? Set 364

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This week's set has been posted:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Rob
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2095 could be an early Theodolite piece
2096 looks like part of a drill which you lean into with your chest or hand for more pressure
2097: Pass
2098: section of a wheel balancer unit
2099: is part of my Grandfathers whiskey still
2100: is a pair of fencing pliers/cutters/hammer/axe
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Yes, it's a wheel balancer though I'm not sure exactly what kind of wheels it's for.

Correct.
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wrote:

It's the entire unit, not a section of one.

I used to own one. It's for automobile wheels. Look at the top plate: there are numerous circles designated with letters A-M, I think, each letter appearing in three circles. The device came with three cones, each having a short peg on the other end, which fit in the holes in the centers of the labelled circles. The instruction manual showed which circles to put the cones in, depending on the year, make, and model of the vehicle (or the number and spacing of the lugs), in order to center the wheel on the top plate by placing the mounting holes over the cones.
There's a bubble level in the center. The three bolts in the base permit adjusting the unit perfectly level before placing a wheel on it; an unbalanced wheel obviously causes the bubble to move off-center.
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Thanks for the information on the balancer, this is the first one of this type that I have seen.
Four of the six have answered correctly this week, still not sure about the German measuring device and the second last item, a couple of new photos have been posted with the answers for this set:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2010/11/set-364.html#answers
Rob
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I think it could be used for laying stone steps. The end flat part would rest on lower step and the adjustable part would be set to the height of the step. Then it would be laid on top of the step with adjustable part standing up and the end flat piece against the front edge. To measure the depth of the step by using the marks on the strait edge for the next step.
Robert
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    [ ... ]

    [ ... ]

    If so -- the steps would be rather shallow. 100mm is only 3.937 inches. Not serious steps if that small -- but perhaps ones which one can flow up without breaking stride for some ceremonial purpose. But a tool like that would certainly be made to have a range more suitable to the extremes of step sizes.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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On 11/27/10 9:10 PM, DoN. Nichols wrote:

How about masonry? You could check each brick as you placed it.
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J Burns wrote:

Just today, on "Ask This Old House," they used a string for that. (each course would line up with the string, etc...)
Cheers! Rich
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Rob H. wrote:

Whatever you have. There are plastic cone shaped pins that fit into the holes. The are set so that they fall into the holes on the wheel. You use the letters to ensure that they are all in the same ones to center the wheel. I have one just like that in the shop. Actually works pretty well. The three bolts in the base allow you to adjust it so it sits level.

--
Steve W.
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2095. Some kind of photography exposure meter or maybe sound level meter.
2097. Something about the shape of this and the obvious soft rubber material reminded me of an adaptor I once had to push connect a hose pipe or shower pipe over a tap (faucet). After a bit of inspired Googling I came up with the Tapi Drinking Fountain Faucet adapator.
http://gizmodo.com/5618588/tapi-a-rubber-adapter-that-turns-your-faucet-into-a-drinking-fountain
What will they think of next?
2098. Pro-Mark seem to make drumming equipment but god knows what this thing is.
2100. Fencing or general woodworking pliers. Pincers, hammer, axe head and screwdriver all in one tool.
--
Dave Baker



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None of the guesses so far for this one are correct.

http://gizmodo.com/5618588/tapi-a-rubber-adapter-that-turns-your-faucet-into-a-drinking-fountain
Good answer!
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2096. The only reference I can find is to pattern makers tooling for casting moulds. This looks like it could be used to set the depth of casting sand in a sand box to a given height below the top edge. However it's certainly a depth gauge of some kind if not in that industry.
--
Dave Baker



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2095 Director's Viewfinder 2096 Height or thickness gage 2097 Brix syrup separator 2098 Wheel balance 2099 Casting for a piston 2100 Leatherman Tool (first edition)
Robert
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Yes, but I don't know exactly what it was supposed to measure. The owners description of it:
...pictures of a tool I bought several years ago at a flea market in Germany. The only information I could find was that Wagner was a foundry in the town of Stekborn (or Steckborn) in Switzerland.The scale on the tool is in mm from 0 to 100. The tool is correctly assembled - if the head on left-hand side in the photographs is turned through 180 degrees, it does look more like a caliper for measuring, but in this case the scale does not start at zero.
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2100 - Tool for opening crates
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wrote:

2100 looks like an all-in-one wire cutter, hatchet, hammer, screwdriver, and pry bar.
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wrote:

2097 is a toilet bottom from the Smurfs?
Mark
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wrote:

2095. Optical Pyrometer. Measures high temperatures by comparing the color of the object to be measured with the filament of a calibrated lamp fed by a variable current supply.
--
Ned Simmons

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On 11/25/10 1:13 PM, Ned Simmons wrote:

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