What is it? Set 346

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wrote:

Taverns used to keep long stem (16") clay pipes for the use of their patrons. After each use, an inch or so would be broken off the stem so that it would have a clean bit for the next user. I can easily see a situation where a tavern owner would hang the rack on the wall to keep it out of harms way. When a customer would request a pipe, the barkeep could take the rack off the wall and set it on the bar so the customer could select one.
Paul K. Dickman
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On 7/26/2010 5:43 PM, Paul K. Dickman wrote:

"http://www.foxrivertraders.com/PROD43.HTM "
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Mouse wrote:

Fox River Traders was correct in saying their clay pipes were identical to those in colonial Williamsburg. Pipes from the simple molds of Shakespeare's time were still produced late in the 20th Century.
They said the part about taking long-stemmed pipes from racks on tavern walls and breaking the ends off was a story. It helped sell racks, but I don't believe the story.
Clay lets you taste tobacco better than other pipes, but brier became more popular late in the 19th Century due to three drawbacks of clay pipes: they're brittle, the bowl gets too hot to hold, and the passage is narrow.
English companies produces lots of clay pipes about 6" long because they could be carried in a pocket and were very cheap. The smoker had to take care not to burn his fingers and his tongue.
Long-stemmed pipes were more fragile and more expensive, but the smoke was cooler and they could be held comfortably by the stem. It's unlikely that a tavern keeper would lend expensive long-stemmed pipes to customers. It's even more unlikely that a customer would ruin a long-stemmed pipe by breaking it. Wiping would probably have been considered adequate. Clay pipes buried in coals would come out pure and white.
A clay pipe would not have been hung stem down because the narrow passage in the stem would soon have gummed up. A tavern keeper would not have presented a customer with a portable display of fragile pipes. Until Victorian times, they were like Model Ts. A customer had only to choose whether he wanted a long one or a short one.
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Lobby Dosser wrote:

I guess they would have dripped as the tallow cooled. You'd want to catch the drips. When you weren't making candles, you'd hang the table on the wall before somebody tripped on it. I'm going to read up on candlemaking!
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wrote:

Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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    Hmm ... how tall is a magnum of Champaigne? It might have been used for outdoor wedding celebrations and the like?
    Are the slots narrow enough to pass the stems of such glasses?
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Height of the *bottle* is not relevant.

Sure doesn't look like it to me.
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On 7/23/2010 10:58 AM, Robert Bonomi wrote:

My inclination is belts or ties.
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Too close to the floor. They'd end up getting dirty, and not convenient to bend down to pick one.
LLoyd
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