What is it? Set 346

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Rob
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On 7/22/2010 5:08 AM, Rob H. wrote:

1991--a dust blower, probably for pesticide
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1990 - Guessing, as to function: To grind a measure of product from a larger block.... of salt, ice? *This model must be for lefthanders!

Seems it would be heavy and/or awkward, to be carrying for a long time. I also thought it may be a handcrank bellow, for a large furnace/fireplace.
Sonny
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1989: I keep thinking that it's a rack that holds smoking pipes, and that the center item is a humidor. The rubber stamp holder sounded pretty good, but it looks to me that the slots are too small in diameter to pass the handles.
Northe
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The height of the beast would seem to rule out being a holder for either rubber stamps or pipes. At 21" tall, that pretty much precludes use _on_ a desk (or a fireplace mantel, for that matter); it about has to sit on the floor.
It _is_ abut the right size to hold a set of fire-place tools, *BUT* I've never seen a set with _ten_ items.
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Robert Bonomi wrote:

A slot leading to a hole suggests hanging an item that's bigger than the hole at each end and thinner than the slot in the middle. The middle could be a cord or wire or rod or chain, for example.
If the table is 21" high, that could be a convenient height for a sitting person, and the hanging items could be much shorter.
The shelf sticks out where somebody might kick it. Perhaps it sticks out to hold a cloth to catch drips from the hanging items.
I don't assume it's a box on the table. If the ring were to lift the lid, wouldn't there be hinges on the near side? Wouldn't a drawer work better? It could be opened without disturbing items on top. The top is marred like a work surface. Is the ring to hang the table on a wall to free floorspace?
Perhaps it's a table to work on an item with ten pieces that can be hung. Perhaps they are hung to keep them sorted by length, to prevent damage, or to prevent tangling. Perhaps they are hung to dry after washing, oiling, or painting.
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Looks like a fly fishing rod holder, probably from a store. or wealthy gent. And the box could hold prized flys.
On 7/23/2010 10:58 AM, Robert Bonomi wrote:

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tiredofspam wrote:

Slotted holes for (tea)spoons. A carrier to serve tea or coffee, with (tea/coffee)can, cups and spoons.
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1989 - I had thought umbrella holder (not large enough, though), a utensil holder and wine glass holder (with coasters under that "lid"). Though the subsequent pic seems to show it hanging outside, I don't think it is/was used outdoors.... that clearcoat finish wouldn't hold up. I'm supposing it is for light, domestic, indoor use.
Another thought: Possibly, some kind of knick knack shelf that was once part of another piece.... like treadle sewing machine drawer framing, removed from an old sewing machine cabinet, and used as a wall mounted knick knack shelf for small collectibles. From what original piece it may have come from, if so, I don't have a clue.
I liked the fly rod holder suggestion, too, but it just doesn't seem large enough or heavy/stable enough for that junction.
Sonny
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Twenty-one inches is awfully tall for a wine glass holder...
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Doug Miller wrote:

The slots appear to be 1/8" wide. Big enough for a wire, cord, small chain, or slender rod.
The holes appear to be 3/10". The center-to-center distance appears to be about 5/8".
I think it was to hang ten items made with wire, chain, cord, or rods less than 1/8" in diameter. Whether or not the fitting at the top end was a bead, it must have been larger than 0.3" and smaller than 5/8". The items would have been less than 18" long from the bead, for the top of the bottom shelf appares to be less than 18" from the top of the holes.
The top appears to be 13" wide and the shelf 17" wide. There must have been a reason to have the shelf jut out where it could be kicked. I wonder if it was to make it easy to place a pan or cloth to catch drips from the hanging items.
The marred block on top suggests to me that the work involved tapping. I'm trying to guess what items would have teen tapped, treated with a liquid, and hung up ten at a time. It doesn't seem tall enough for necklaces, and I don't know of such parts in a musical instrument.
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wrote:

How about candles? Hanging by the wick.
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That was originally my thought, but you'd want the sets of holes on either side evenly divisible by two.
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Steve wrote:

Conventionally, candles were made in pairs with a common wick slung over a rack. It seems to me that you would have to be slow and careful lest the candles swing against each other, causing deformation and possibly sticking.
I imagine dipping should be as brief as possible. The warmer the candle got, the less wax it would bring out of the kettle, and the longer you would have to wait before dipping again.
I think this stand was designed for dipping candles singly, each suspended from a marble-sized bead. If you didn't have to worry about knocking candles together, you could dip them very briefly. That would mean adding more wax per dip and a shorter cycle time.
If I were dipping candles, I might flare the slots toward the edge of the table, making it a little quicker and easier to slide a wick into a slot.
Normally, perhaps the finish of the table withstood the heat of a kettle full of wax at the melting point, but sometimes the finish could be damaged. I think the center of the table was raised so it could be refinished without refinishing the rest of the tabletop.
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Candle dipping is messy work. No way would a candle maker use a decorative rack like this for it. And it would be COVERED with wax.
--riverman
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humunculus wrote:

What part of the rack is made for decorative form and not function?
Suppose the household needs ten candles a week, made from tallow, beeswax, or something else. The quickest method would also be the neatest, by getting the wax to stick to the candle instead of dripping.
Before starting, I'd let the kettle cool on the hearth until the wax began hardening around the sides. Having it as cool as possible would help it stick to a candle instead of melting the candle. Then I'd dip quickly so that the candle would stay as cool as possible so that the most wax would stick.
The reason to make ten candles at a time would be to allow each candle plenty of cooling time between dips, without making the candle maker wait.
There would probably be some dripping. To remove hardened wax easily for reuse, I'd want finished wood, perhaps wiped with oil just before I started dipping.
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Candle Dipping at Middleton Place. http://www.flickr.com/photos/damiavos/4714270328 / Karl
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

With seven big kettles, they must have made hundreds of pounds of candles at a time. Many of the candles are pointed at the bottom. I think that means that during dipping, the bottoms tended to overheat.
A small household operation might minimize the problem by dipping candles quickly, one by one.
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Actually they only used one pot. The rest are just decoration. If I remember correctly the pot was partially filled with water with the wax floating on top so they wouldn't need so much. There was no real training one person would just show another how they'd been shown to do it. It was just done for the tourists. I was taught blacksmithing there by the farrier. I made shingles there but didn't find out how to do it right till many years later. Karl
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Hot water! I remember making blocks of wax from honeycomb that way.
That could explain why some candles are shaped like carrots. Water holds a lot of heat. If the end of the candle extended into the water, it could get especially warm. It wouldn't accumulate much wax.
I think I'd prefer using a small kettle on a little table. I wouldn't have to do any walking because I could reach all ten candles from my chair.
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