What is it? Set 344

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1979 looks like a Crinoid stem, but since its so prominently displayed, I'll say its a piece of Corporalite.
--riveman
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Given the current state of Corporations in general, your term might be correct. But, I think it's "coprolite", meaning petrified shit.
<G> LLoyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote in message

Maybe "corporalite" is corporate shit. It could be part of a Chevrolet. d8-)
--
Ed Huntress



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On Thu, 8 Jul 2010 21:56:59 -0400, the renowned "Ed Huntress"

It could be corporal shit, which ranks below general shit and major shit, but above private shit.
Best regards, Spehro Pefhany
--
"it's the network..." "The Journey is the reward"
snipped-for-privacy@interlog.com Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
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Kinda reminds me of the story that ran in the Indianapolis paper some years ago about a local man who had joined the Army and had to endure a lot of razzing about his name and rank. He's of Italian ancestry; his name is pronounced as "orr-ih-FEE-chay"... but it's *spelled* "Orifice". And since he had just joined, his rank was, of course, Private. Private Orifice.
Good thing he didn't join the Navy.
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On 7/8/2010 11:17 PM, Spehro Pefhany wrote:

But a "corporal lite" would be a Lance Corporal, and I don't think you wanna call one of them "shit" to his face.
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    Posting from Rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
1975)    This looks like a tension tool as part of a lock picking set.
    Perhaps a little thick (and thus stiff) for the task, but     useable.
1976)    Part of a maker's logo - but rather large, so perhaps     the logo is on an advertising sign.
1977)    At a guess -- this is inlaid in a woodworker's bench, and by     pressing on one end, the other end stands up to serve as a     workpiece stop or by pressing the other end, the workpiece can     slide up it.
1978)    Bowl for washing hands, and the smaller ones are for storing     soap in, with the holes draining the excess water to the soap     does not turn into goo.
1979)    Hmm ... sort of looks like a chunk of pumice (volcanic rock     that floats) on a support rod.
    Or -- it might be a heating element, given what looks like a     hint of a power cord near the left hand end.
1980)    Stocks for punishing a misbehaving dog?
    Otherwise, something for supporting one end of a rotating shaft.
    Now to see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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1Rob H. wrote:

1980 is intriguing. I wonder what the tag says.
Opened up, it looks big enough to stick something up to 6 x 8" through. The wooded screw is long enough to push the bars closed, but the shape of the cutout suggests that it was made to clamp a large range of sizes. The cutouts would keep the clamped object centered under the screw.
The feet seem to contact the floor at six points. The corner contact points would provide stability, while the center ones would help it support a lot of weight. They appear to be adjustable.
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It was photographed in an antique store, so it's just the price tag, they didn't know what it was for.
Tough set this week, the two mystery items are still unidentified, the rest of the answers can be seen here:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2010/07/set-344.html#answers
Rob
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Rob H. wrote:

Whiskey!
Traditionally in England, the US gallon was a standard size for a wine barrel. The imperial gallon was a standard size for a beer barrel.
In the 19th Century, American saloons didn't have the wholesome atmosphere of pubs. Small, recyclable barrels may have been the most practical way to drink whiskey, wine, and possibly beer at home.
On a counter, 1980 would position a small barrel where a glass could be put under the spout. When the level was low, the barrel could be reclamped so it tilted down toward the tap.
The screw may be wooden for elegance. Wooden threads may have worn out frequently. That could be why the screw is so long. If threads wore or broke, you could use new threads by sawing an inch off the end.
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Sorry, not buying that. Among other things, the openings in the clamp jaws have *far* too tight a radius of curvature to have ever been intended to hold a barrrel. Further, the length of the screw clearly shows that the device is intended to accomodate either objects of vastly different sizes, or one object whose size or shape changes vastly as the tool is used. Your explanation below of the purpose of the long screw seems far-fetched, to put it charitably.

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Can you cite links to prove your opinion?
I didn't think so.
Sorry, not buying that. Among other things, the openings in the clamp jaws have *far* too tight a radius of curvature to have ever been intended to hold a barrrel. Further, the length of the screw clearly shows that the device is intended to accomodate either objects of vastly different sizes, or one object whose size or shape changes vastly as the tool is used. Your explanation below of the purpose of the long screw seems far-fetched, to put it charitably.
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Doug Miller wrote:

Wooden threads don't hold up well on a push broom. That's why I think 1980 has a wooden screw for visual appeal. If I damaged a wooden screw, I couldn't make a new one, but I could saw the end off if it had length to spare.
The cutouts are about a third of the width of the frame opening. If the radius were half that width, that is, the same as a barrel that would completely fill the frame, the cutouts would form corners of about 40 degrees. From the photo, who can say for sure it's more than 40 degrees?
If the angle is more than 40 degrees, that means the cutouts are a little small for a barrel that would fill the frame. It's better for them to be too small than two big. If a cutout is too big for a barrel, the barrel will contact only the center of the cutout. The barrel could twist, allowing the bulge of the barrel to slip out. If the cutout is too small, the corners of the cutout will contact the barrel, preventing twisting.
Ebay has lots of small wine barrels with cradles. One barrel was made in 1947. They're still popular because even if you buy wine and liquor in bottles, keeping it in wood can improve it.
1980 may have two advantages over ordinary cradles. First, when the level got low, it would be easy to tilt the barrel by pulling the top of the frame forward and putting shims under the heels of the feet. Second, the clamp could hold a piece of cloth over the vent, keeping bugs out and protecting the flavor while allowing air to be sucked in as the beverage was drawn. With a cradle, you'd have to remember to replace the vent stopper.
Liquor barrels would have been less desirable after 1933 than before 1919. Pneumatic tires must have made the brittleness of bottles less of a problem than in the 19th Century, and returnable barrels would have had to be shipped farther. Bottles were probably cheaper and tougher than before.
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Interesting theory, I'll pass it on the the person who sent the photo.
This makes a good segue to a previous item from a few weeks ago, the one that I had thought was a barrel stand, it was shot in a small museum but they didn't have the item identified. I sent them an email and here is their reply:
"It's a stand that was used to bundle rolls of wallpaper in preparation for shipping. A paper covering material (possibly cardboard) was placed in the form. Then printed rolls of wallpaper were placed on the covering and the covering was wrapped around the bundle. The leather straps were also wrapped around the bundle and tightened with the crank to compress the rolls. Then string or tape was wrapped around to secure the bundle, ready for shipping. The stand is open in the middle so string could be put around the package and then lifted out of the stand."
Here's a photo in case you forgot what it looks like:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/Album11/pic1962d.jpg
So a gold star is awarded to everyone who thought this was some type of bundler.
Rob
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Rob H. wrote: ...

Yeah, but doubtful imo; just doesn't look like it would do the job (well) and many of the conjectures I don't think hold up at all.
I presume there's a slot in the legs that let the upper half rise up? I really don't know the precise function but I'm wagering the form follow the function very closely and doesn't include tipping it up w/ shims under the legs or sawing off the end of the threads on the press screw...

kewl, thanks for the update...
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dpb wrote:

One interesting thing about the form is the wooden screw. Tightened down several times a day, it wouldn't last long. I would expect it to be a simple threaded dowel so that somebody with dowels and a die could replace it easily. Instead, the screw has a fancy, finished knob, as if it were intended to last years. That leads me to believe it was designed to hold something that didn't require much pressure and wasn't changed often.
It's also interesting that everything but the screw seems to be made of 2x4s. Was it homemade?
The Volstead Act made it illegal to manufacture, sell, transport, import, or export alcoholic beverages except those for Woodrow Wilson. Six months later it became legal to manufacture up to 200 gallons of wine per year in one's home for one's own use. Wine consumption soared.
This may be the story behind the small wine barrels and cradles on ebay. If you made small batches of wine, you would want to age it. If you bought moonshine and added grape juice, aging it in small barrels would improve it and make it look respectable and lawful, to tattletale visitors and your drinking guests.
I wonder if plans for this item appeared in a handyman magazine during the surge of interest in winemaking. The prospective winemaker could envision displaying his hooch in his living room while visitors admired his workmanship with a lathe and a die.
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What makes you think the wooden screw wouldn't last? They are quite rugged and were used daily in woodworking trades for bench screws and clamping.
Once upon a time, that 'fancy finished knob' was standard workmanship.
scott
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Scott Lurndal wrote:

I seem to recall using clamps with wooden screws. Did they mate with metal fittings?
I liked the way they didn't vibrate loose. For a real carpenter, they would mean self-reliance: he could make and replace them.
I seem to recall that good wooden screws (intended to last) had threads with a square cross section, and had a larger diameter and coarser pitch than to a metal screw for the same job. The screw for 1980 appears to have an outside diameter of only 1/2" and a fairly fine pitch, like a metal screw I might expect to see used for such a clamp.
Fancy finished knobs may have been standard workmanship, but I wouldn't expect one on the handle of a screw-in push broom. The manufacturer would have to start with a bigger piece of wood, and shaping the knob would increase labor costs. Price is an important consideration for a threaded wooden device that may not last long.
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I was wondering that too, it looks to me the top bar, the one with the wooden screw in it, can rotate. If you look at the left hand side, it seems only connected to the vertical rail at the center. If that is a peg, that means the upper bar can rotate around, but would be stationary as far as the height.
It's not clear if the bottom bar, the one with the hole in it, can slide up and down. It also looks like to me on the bottom bar, there is an indent from the wood screw being tightend all the way down, or if the bar moves, it presses against the screw.
Point is, both bars can't move, there wouldn't be anything holding the whole thing together. I'm guessing the bottom one with the hole is fixed and doesn't slide up and down.
So I don't think it's a clamp.
I beleive, whatever the use is, you grab the ball on the wood screw and spin that whole top peice around, slide something onto the screw, rotate it back down and tighten.
Like a cylinder of twine or yarn.
Wish there was a bit more info, if either bar can slide, if both vertical rails have a groove in them.
-bruce snipped-for-privacy@ripco.com
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Bruce Esquibel wrote:

...
The top piece is stationary, you can see a small amount of the tenon/dowel where the left lag has separated slightly from the end is all.
Indeed, the compression indent on the upper half of the split pieces at the bottom is quite apparent. From that alone one can infer it was used to clamp something between the upper interior and bottom (indeed, fixed) pieces. Altho as noted earlier I don't have a good feel for what that actually was, I just don't think the wine/whiskey guess is in the right ballpark. Crystal ball is murky; could even be wrong but just doesn't feel right...
The question that might give the clue would be how far is the upper clamp bar allow to move? The oddity in the design in my mind is the asymmetry between the height and the cutout area and length of screw. If the object needed the full height then if it were round it doesn't need to have been so tall and the diameter of the cutout is quite small in comparison. Which leads me back to the idea there was a very specific purpose leading to those dimensions but I don't have a good guess as to what that purpose was. Inspection of the jaws themselves and other clues only visible from detailed examination might lend a few clues but not possible from the picture.
My guess is it isn't terribly old, either...there appear to be planer ripple marks in the clamping pieces that weren't fully removed before finishing. Note the vertical dark parallel lines in them that are consistent between the two. The piece was milled, the hole cut and then the two separated.
Where the piece was located/found _might_ be of some clue as well.
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