What is it? Set 342

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The latest set of items has been posted:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Rob
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1968 (step one in the making of a) Bowling pin?

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I reckon you are right:
http://www.bowling2u.com/trivia/pins/making_pins.asp
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But I *KNOW* what #1968 is -- it's a bowling pin.
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#1963 Measuring gauge, to a pre-set dimension. The two tapered pins locate in holes / grooves on the test piece that should be a known distance apart, at which point the scale on the end reads 0. Any discrepancy and the scale shows it.
#1965 Maybe a coachmaker's, cooper's or wheelwright's shave. Can't tell too easily without seeing the business end, which is underneath. It might even be a chairmaker's travisher. It's a long-handled router plane, a relative of the spokeshave, used for woodworking. A chisel edge on the opposite end of that metal tooth shaves the bottom surface of a groove. Many of these are highly specialised tools made for a single task, and a particular worker might use a large number of them, but intermittently.
#1967 Herbal cannabis grinder. It's the Summer festival season, these things turned in nice timbers can be good sellers for woodturners (use bamboo kebab skewers for the pins).
#1968 Some funny Yankee sporting goods. A rounders bat, basketball club, that sort of thing.
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There was one more photo of this tool but I don't think it will tell us very much:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/Album11/pic1965a.jpg
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    Actually -- it does. I was wondering where the shavings went with the solid plug there, and this shows a path.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
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Looks like a scraper, more than a chisel edge, so the shavings will be minimal anyway and won't need much space to clear them.
As it's a scraper, this is probably for end grain or cross grain working. Nearest I've seen to this thing before has been tools for inlaying marquetry bandings. The groove is cleared initially with a chisel-like router plane, this end-on scraper is then used to form the groove exactly to size.
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1963 I agree that this looks like a gauge, to check that the distance between two points is within some limit, but... The shape of the pins (conical, blunted tip, parallel diagonal flats on corresponding sides) is cause for some thought. They seem designed to give bad measurements if used for common subject points. To measure the distance between two planes, they should be spheres. To measure the distance between two round holes, they should be cylinders. The pin-shape seems to be designed for a very special measurement. Seth Thomas was primarily known for making clocks, but I'm hard pressed to think of parts of a clock that are about 1.5 inches apart that would be gauged. Perhaps this is used for set-up of some machine tool?
wrote:

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The point on the end is stationary, the other point can be moved within the quarter inch slot, when it's centered in the slot the points are exactly one inch apart.
Rob
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wrote:

Indeed. As the measuring axis is axial, the flat surfaces are the important ones. This is a tool for grooves, not holes, and it's grooves with angled walls.
As another poster has suggested, this probably means thread pitch measurement.
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1964.... Cover for a fire hydrant. WW
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Correct!
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Are you sure? Looks more like a sub-species of Dalek.
http://www.fmft.net/archives/deleks/daleks2.jpg
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    Posting from Rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
1963)    (hmm ... what was I doing in 1963? :-)
    Anyway -- I believe this to be a test gauge for verifying the     center-to-center spacing of either small holes or center-drilled     shaft ends.
    The conical pieces go into the holes, and the pointer at the     flat end shows how much over or under size it is.
    The end conical piece is rigid, but he center one can move back     and forth in a slot.
    The flats on the sides of the conical pieces allows the center     distance (with a correction added in) to be measured with a     micrometer or a snap gauge.
    It looks as though it can be re-zeroed for different center     distances by adjusting the knurled collar to read zero with the     proper size snap gauge in place.
    It looks to be capable of displaying up to 0.006" over or     undersized from zero.
    What is the full maker's name on the indicator part? It does     not look like one which I know -- but it also looks like a very     old one.
1964)    Strange thing.
    From this angle, it looks like one of two things
    1)    Cover to prevent access to a fire hydrant. Two screws         on the left hand side to open it -- with perhaps two         more on the other side -- or a hinge.
    2)    Possibly a cover over a large valve, with the black top         disc acting as the valve handle.
1965)    If it were not for the sold wedge holding in the metal piece, I     would think that it might be a very narrow plane for grooving     a wood workpiece.
1966)    Do the metal rods (which I expect to be actually hollow tubes)     have a thread on the far end similar tot he one on the near end     of the bent funnel object?
    If so, I would think that it is designed to feed oil or some     other liquid into something which is otherwise hard to reach.     You screw together as many tubes as needed together, with the     plastic one being the last to slide into a hole on the side of     the machine.
    A rather nice carrying case on it, however -- which makes it     sort of look like a medical accessory.
1967)    At a guess -- metal covers for the ends of wood parts to     prevent them from splitting on impact -- as from someone driving     them into the ground
    The spikes on the inside of the caps would attach them firmly to     the end of the wood, and the rim would be a nice fit on the wood     OD.
1968)    Looks like a rough wood shape being built up prior to decorative     turning of something like a table lamp. Normally, I would     expect more different colors of wood, but perhaps these woods     take stains differently.
    Now to see what other have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
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DoN. Nichols wrote:

erected on a mill stream in 1724 for a saw mill, then a grist mill. In the 19th Century it began producing scythes, and that supported a charcoal industry. Then, through much of the 19th and into the 20th Century, it sold machine knives worldwide as the Stiles and later Hankey Machine Knife Manufactory. The stream was inadequate, so they built an aqueduct several miles long about the time of the Civil War. If a machinist in Greenville produced a measuring device, was it to make machine knives?
Greenville was one of several manufacturing villages in Leicester, which in the 19th Century had a population of about 2,000, mostly farmers. From 1780 to 1890, Leicester produced a third of the textile cards in America. Several tanneries and a wire mill sprang up to supply the card mills.
Shuttles, bobbins, heddles, and heddle frames were also produced. If the device was not to manufacture machine knives, could it have been useful for making cards, shuttles, bobbins, heddles, or heddle frames?
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| Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564

Seems Bicknell-Thomas made clutches. http://books.google.com/books?id MvAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA1-PA168&lpg=RA1-PA168&dq=bicknell-thomas+co&source=bl&ots=YfwcdaTjk_&sig=Y_VFq2gLsSRLVQzhs6SCwJ_2q0o&hl=en&ei=YbYkTJfdLoG0lQeB5cyqBA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=9&ved DkQ6AEwCA#v=onepage&q=bicknell-thomas%20co&flse
Could it be some kind of gauge or tool for clutch making.
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I think you're right about the tubes being threaded on the far end. This photo was sent from Australia, the person who sent it to me does not own the item but was just sent the photo by someone else.
The rest of them have been answered correctly this week:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2010/06/set-342.html#answers
Rob
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1963 a special clockmakers depthing tool for mass produced clocks.
Steve. R.
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1963: the 60-degree tips suggests this is a thread pitch checker. Zero it on a known standard, and the needle swings if the unit under test is the wrong pitch.
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