What is it? Set 341

Page 1 of 2  
Another set has been posted on the web site:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

1959 - is it a tool for cutting rings (jewellery) from fingers, as used by firefighters, EMS staff.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, it's a ring cutter that was patented in 1900.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

#1957 Fishing? trap? Don't think it's a spear, as there's no handle, so I guess it's baited and left tied by the rope on the left. I'd like to think it's an octopus trap, with sucker carvings on one piece to attract prey by sympathetic magic 8-)
#1958 Lock gate. Canal is gone, but you can see one bank behind.
#1959 Ring cutter to release fingers
#1960 Single or double-ended wad punch. Does it make circles or holes? I'm going to guess it's a high-speed manual tool for cutting musket patches two at a time, switching to a single cut for using up the offcuts.
#1961 Electric blower, for carefully distributing and controlling airflow, but what on earth for?
#1962 Bundle tier. Place the bundle of coppiced sticks (?) in the saddle, tighten them up with a strap and the ratchet winch on the left, then tie them up with string.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
1957. i'd say it's a fish "hook/spear". like, standing on a platform over a salmon (for example, not sure exactly what kind of fish) stream, attached to the end of a spear that has a socket on it's end, plunge it onto a salmon, impales the salmon, becomes dislodged from the spear socket, haul the salmon out of the water by the attached cord.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Fish hook is correct although it's not for salmon but for a different particular fish.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If I can guess twice, sturgeon or shad.
--
Ed Huntress



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nope, neither one of those.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

are eels fish? do people catch eels with "hooks"?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm not sure about either of these questions but eels is not the answer that I was looking for.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

If not salmon, I'll guess halibut.
--
“The problem with socialism is that eventually you run out of other people’s
money.” - Margaret Thatcher
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Good guess! It's a halibut hook.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Jun 18, 1:52pm, "Stormin Mormon"

Yes, eel are fish, and people tend to catch them with traps, however they can be hooked. They are brutally hard to kill. I hooked one when I was a kid....the rod just bent over; no tug or anything, while this fiercesome thing squiggled at the end like a sidewinder on sand. When I retrieved it, I cut off the head, slit its belly and gutted it, hacked it into 2-inch sections, tossed them in a baggie and put them in the freezer. Took it out about 4 months later, tossed the frozen pieces in a frying pan and turned on the heat to cook it up. Once they started to thaw, each section started twitching in the pan. Amazing.
--riverman
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
humunculus wrote:
<snip>

It's because they eel very quickly.
--
Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk
Email: -http://www. +rjh@
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 18 Jun 2010 13:53:32 -0400, Ted Schuerzinger

eel poetry?
When an eel bites your knee, as you swim in the sea.. that's a Moray
Japanese Unagi don (BBQ eel on rice) is pretty good.
http://www.plateoftheday.com/food_blog/japanese_food/unagiOverRice.gif
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 18 Jun 2010 15:13:38 -0400, Spehro Pefhany wrote:

Or as seen in a BC (johnny heart) book
When an eel lunges out and bites off your snout that's a Moray
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Eels are mostly caught in basket traps. If you're after individuals, the weapon of choice is an eel spear, a multi-pronged trident.
Eel spears in the UK have many variations, regional, river type and individual maker. If you find an old one, they're highly collectible ($100s!)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
William Wixon wrote:

skeleton, but no, or few, scales. I don't know if they catch them with hooks or not. I've heard they catch them by leaving bait in the water ... like a dead cow. Pull in the carcass, and it's full of eels.
And don't confuse a Lamprey with an eel ... even though they are sometimes, and incorrectly, called Lamprey Eels. A Lamprey is a different critter, with only a primitive cartilaginous skeleton ... almost more like a big worm. These booldsuckers can live in just about any water, fresh or salt, and attack most fish or anything else in the water including humans. Nasty things. They've become a real plague in the Great Lakes.
Dan Mitchell ===========
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

We catch them with hooks here (new Jersey), baited with almost any piece of fish or even meat. And be prepared to cut off your leader and throw it away when you land one. They twist it into knots.
They're easy to skin and gut, and then you can cut them into 6" lengths, put them on a hotdog stick, and cook them over a grill or campfire. That cooks out the oil, which is extensive. They're good eating.
--
Ed Huntress


>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I just updated the information on the web site for this tool to say that the holes on the ends are all about 1/2" diameter, not sure what size musket patches are but I was thinking that they were larger than that.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.