What is it? Set 336

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Just posted another set of miscellaneous items:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Rob
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1931. Bar shot for a canon. Really good for taking out ships rigging. Karl
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1931. Bar shot for a canon. Really good for taking out ships rigging. Karl =========== I looked up bar shot. Got all kinds of info on alcoholic drinks. So I added the word cannon. Interesting stuff. Apparently another name for this projectile was angel. No idea why.
Another interesting projectile was a hot shot. This was a heated cannon ball shot from shore batteries at wooden ships. It would land on the ship and start fires.
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leemichaels*nadaspam*@comcast.net says...

Two wings plus irony is my guess.
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Go to http://MarcDashevsky.com to send me e-mail.

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writes

1928 I guess that there is a rod connected to the centre of the star, passing through the brickwork behind it, and under tension. The purpose is to help stop the wall from collapsing outwards. But this wall looks to be in good condition.
1930 Rolls of hay, wrapped in polythene to protect them?
Nick
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Nick Wedd snipped-for-privacy@maproom.co.uk

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Nick Wedd wrote: ...

Basically. It's called "net wrap" and does serve to shed water as well as hold a bale together more reliably than does "string wrap". Runs a little more (we are ~$US 0.50/bale on infield charge differential)
<http://www.balernetwrap.com/index.html
--
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dpb wrote:

Oh, and to avoid any possible confusion there's no connection to these folks; just happened upon them some time back and knew had the up-close photos and product pictures...we're in SW KS and bale (not custom-work) 5-600A of our native grass hay annually (small amount in comparison to the custom guys like these).
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Yes, I don't know the exact name for it but your description is accurate.
Rob
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They're called gib plates. The ends and rods together are called earthquake rods or bolts. I didn't know what the gib plates were called so I had to look them up. http://www.eas.slu.edu/Earthquake_Center/1886EQ/wjmjpgs/wjm_h26.html
http://earthquakes.suite101.com/article.cfm/the_charleston_earthquake_of_1886
"Visible evidence of the 1886 quake can be observed as earthquake rods, which consist of long steel rods extending through buildings and tightened at each end to pull the opposite exterior walls closer together." Karl
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They're called gib plates. The ends and rods together are called earthquake rods or bolts. I didn't know what the gib plates were called so I had to look them up. http://www.eas.slu.edu/Earthquake_Center/1886EQ/wjmjpgs/wjm_h26.html
http://earthquakes.suite101.com/article.cfm/the_charleston_earthquake_of_1886
"Visible evidence of the 1886 quake can be observed as earthquake rods, which consist of long steel rods extending through buildings and tightened at each end to pull the opposite exterior walls closer together." Karl
--------
Thanks! I like the sound of "earthquake bolts".
Rob
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Those pictures look different than ours. Ours are 1" or so rods spanning the width of the building with the gib plates and nuts on the outside of the walls. On the interior it looks like the rod just goes through the hole in the wall. I've never seen one up close though.
Karl
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I'm pretty sure these would be useless in keeping a building together during an earthquake. In fact, the only place I see them referred to when I google 'earthquake rods' is in reference to Charleston. I saw tons of them in Latvia (where it is very seismically stable), and where they were exclusively on stone masonry buildings, usually hundreds of years old. I was told that the purpose there is to provide lateral support as buildings tend to spread as they settle.
--riverman
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Check this out, especially the comment at the end. http://tinyurl.com/28xghne
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And here's the best one. About halfway down: http://www.gobrick.com/BIA/technotes/t44.pdf
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Thanks! Those are both good links, I added the first one to my answer.
Rob
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I agree. The failure method of brick-and-mortar is not "falling outward". Rather, it is "failure in tension" (i.e. the mortar-brick bond fails as the wall stretches as the surface waves go by). Or the bricks themselves fail for the same reason. Settling, even big winds, yes, earthquake resistence, no.
-Zz
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Not very clear, can't see any detail, just blobs in a field but my guess is pig shelters
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1930 - scare coyotes
and photobucket (enlarge image) has 4 viruses ... :(
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Sorry about that, this is the first time that I've heard of a virus problem with photobucket, just did a search on it and found that some people have had issues with this starting in January. I've used my account several times a week all year and haven't had a problem.
Thanks for letting me know about it, I just removed all of the "Larger image" links on my current post, I'll do some more searching and see what I can find out about this.
Rob
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I contacted Photobucket and they sent me this reply:
There had been a virus issue related to a third party ad and this most likely affected many sites and not just Photobucket.
What was the exact message your friend saw and was he alerted by a particular anti-virus program?
Can you provide a link to your blog and the image he followed so we can try to recreate the steps?
Sincerely,
Your Photobucket Support Team
-----
If you answer his questions I'll pass them along to Photobucket.
Thanks, Rob
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