What is it? Set 324

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This week's set has been posted:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Rob
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1856 Printing Press.
1857 Solid? Brass? Carefully machined threads, keyway, retaining clip hole... One with threads cut off? One badly corroded? I'll guess parts salvaged from an old naval steam engine.
1858 Old roman oil bottle.
1859 One-way feed sprag/dog from an old wood planer/miller. Though the hole seems a bit feeble compared with the robustness of the part.
1860 Demonstration land mine.

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"Alexander Thesoso" wrote:

Agree.
Gives all the appearances of being a boat shaft; however, if so they would be bronze, not brass.
Brass and salt water are not compatible.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

If they're either brass _or_ bronze the color rendition is all fouled up methinks.
Indescript shafts off most any piece of equipment; look like been cut off on other end; would expect keyways or other fittings as well. Not many shafts have one end keyed/threaded and the other end just a bare shaft; there's nothing to hold it in place or for it to do but rotate; it can't transmit power to/from anything unless there was a press fit on the other end.
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dpb wrote:

OK, hadn't looked at the closeup view; they're tapered for bearing; need closeup of other ends to have much hope of any specific application unless there are hints from where they were obtained, etc.
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wrote:

1855 - Stirrup for a saddle, with an incongruous piece of baling twine wrapped around it? Early and unsuccessful prototype slingshot?
1856 - Printing press; the ink rollers are immediately visible, the ink goes on the round plate at the top, and the paper to be printed goes in the slot just underneath the rollers. Pressing the foot pedal would presumably start the action, and cause the ink rollers to move down and ink the type (also in the slot area) and then press the paper against the inked type, probably breaking off any fingers that also happened to straggle in the way.
1857 - Maybe tamper rods for setting blasting charges when mining rock? Brass would avoid the problem of striking sparks while tamping, while being heavier than wood (which is not uncommonly used).
1858 - I'd say it's a bottle, but that seems far to easy. Maybe instead it's a weight for tying on the end of a rope to keep it taut.
1859 - Maybe an anti-kickback dog for a sawmill? Maybe a latching lever for an old hand brake lever or similar, presumably engaging against a toothed quadrant?
1860 - Seed dusting apparatus (for applying fungicides or other powdered chemicals)?
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Muffled rowlock, with most of the rope missing?
http://www.maritimeheritageeast.org.uk/archive/rowlocks-or-oarlocks
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wrote:

1856: Platen printing press. I've operated these.
1858: A bottle.
1859: Part of a ratchet assembly, but from what I have no idea.
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#1855 Linstock. Used (on a long wooden staff) for firing older cannon. The string wrapped around it is a slow-match, soaked in saltpetre
#1856 Printing press
#1858 Poison bottle, heavy duty. There should be a wicker protective cage around it.
#1860 Anti-tank landmine
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Yes, that's what was marked.
Rob
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1856: Chandler & Price old style printing press. Maybe a 12x16.
1858: Fire grenade?
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Not sure if it's a C&P, I'll take your word for it.

This is correct.
Rob
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It sure looks like a C&P, either that or it's an _awfully_ good imitation. :)
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1857 looks like the rod used in fire hydrants, except for the really short lengths.
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1855: Trailer hitch 1856: Press 1857: Part of an engine, maybe? 1858: Sometimes a bottle is just a bottle 1859: Part of an adjustable wrench 1860: Well, it's orange. Perhaps a potters wheel motor?
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1855 No idea 1856 old manual printing press. Like the one in the Apple Dumpling Gang. 1857 no idea, but I like the idea that it was a tamp to put explosives in a drilled hole to cut rock at a quarry or open up a tunnel in a mine. 1858 High voltage power line insulator. 1859 some sort of hand cam lock for a machine with 1 - 6 speeds forward? and one reverse. X = Park or lock?? 1860 When I first looked I thought land mine. Others who have posted thought the same thing. So I agree 8>)
Mike in Ohio
Rob H. wrote:

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    Posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
1885)    Looks like a socket in the handle, so (assuming that     the rope does not belong) I think that it might be for     handling a vessel for melting and pouring metal used in casting.     The eyes (are they fully closed eyes, or hooks?) fit over studs     on the sides of the vessel, so the vessel remains level as you     lift it clear of the furnace, yet allow tilting it sideways.
1886)    An old printing press. Not sure whether this is an offset     press or not, but I am sure that it is a printing press.
1887)    Hmm .... I personally doubt that these are brass. I strongly     suspect that they are bronze instead -- probably "naval bronze".
    And -- I think that they are propeller shafts for fairly small     boats. The tapered and keyed ends of two of them would accept     the propeller with a tapered hole, and the key slot accepts a     key to keep the propeller from rotating on the shaft. The     threaded end accepts a castelated nut to pull the propeller     firmly on the shaft, and the cross-drilled hole accepts a bronze     cotter key to keep the nut from unscrewing.
    The upper one appears to be incomplete. It has the key, but     does not appear to have the taper and certainly does not have     the threaded section. Perhaps the taper and/or thread was     damaged and sawn off in preparation for re-turning it on a lathe     to fit a new propeller.
    Normal brass has zinc in it, which dissolved out in water,     especially in salt water, while the bronze specified will last a     long time under water.
1888)    An apocothery bottle? For whatever reason, I expect it to     have contained ammonia based on the color.
1889)    A pawl which is part of a gripping device. There is a flat     plate approximately tangent to the curve of the toothed section     shown, and the toothed section pivots away from the flat section     when the gripped part is moved from left to right, but pivots     towards it and digs the teeth in when the motion is in the other     direction. Some would have a spring to hold them closed. Some     might have a cable to release the grip. This one looks as     though it is simply counterbalanced so the grip with no motion     will be fairly light.
1890)    Hmm ... could this be an anti-vehicular mine? It is buried in     the area where the vehicle is expected, and either pressure on     the ring transmitted via the cross-bars trips the explosive, or     a magnetic sensor telling it that there is a lot of steel or     iron above it.
    I've seen equipment designed to bury these in a row, but the     examples were OD in color, not this bright orange/yellow. The     shape and size is about right however.
    Now to see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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No offset blanket, no offset roller. "Offset" printing involves printing a negative image from a "plate" onto a "web" or "blanket" (often of rubber), then impressing that rubber sheet against the paper to create the positive copy. It also usually involves an ink-acceptor "plate" photo-engraved with the print image - instead of type - that uses water to repel ink from the areas that shouldn't accept ink.
This press just smunges ink around the spinning inking plate with a brayer-like inking roller, then the roller transfers it to a frame of movable type or an etched type plate (or counterfeit bill plate <G>), which impresses the image directly onto the paper.
LLoyd
LLoyd
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We are checking to confirm brass or bronze. The color in the photo is correct. A bluish gray. The are over 3 1/2 feet long and solid. Very very heavy. So I doubt they are propeller shafts for any 'small' boat.
You are right. The upper one is incomplete. It appears that the machined end had been sawed off at one point. There is nothing to grip on or get any traction on the larger plain end if the intent was to turn the rods from that end. The rods are tapered: being narrower in circumfrence on the machined end.
They come from an estate of a 89 year old man who was a former John Deere and CAT dealer and an ultimate pack rat. We have no clue as to what the rods usage was or what they belonged to as a machinery part.
Mystery...don't we love it?
Oh...and the printing press is a platen press.....my family was in the printing business and we used one in a small printing company and weekly newspaper in the 1950's that my parent's operated.
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Dang- steering wheel shaft? But why not steel, then...
Dave
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