What is it? Set 317

Page 1 of 2  
The New Years Eve edition of 'What is it?' has been posted:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

At an educated guess, 1813 is a hydraulic lifter - a part of the valve train in an engine.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
At an educated guess, 1813 is a hydraulic lifter - a part of the valve train in an engine. The piece sticking out of the lifter is upside down - the depression should face up.
--
Peter DiVergilio
All the money I ever wasted was spent trying to impress somebody who was
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Thanks to everyone who provided this answer, looks like it is correct.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

1815: Appears to have a (pipe) collet in it. So my guess is that it might be used to raise or support pipe via the rope.
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Oops, I meant couplet (pipe connector), not collet.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

1813 -- This may be cheating, but I googled "HL 1846" and followed a few links. There's a photo at http://tinyurl.com/ylro4wt which kind of looks like this, so I'm going to guess it's a hydraulic cam lifter. Here's a better picture of a similar item: http://tinyurl.com/yzgsp6c
1818 -- I was going to guess a blank for milling custom switchplates, but it's too short.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

1813 - Hydraulic lifter from an older (or older-design) engine.
--
Ed Huntress



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

1813: Hydraulic lifter
1815: some sort of tie up for an animal
1816: Gambrel Used to spread open the cavity of a slaughterd pig, Also used to hang them by.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Also used to hang them by.
This is correct.
Thought I would try something different and just put the answers at the bottom of the original post, also, after the last answer is a photo of ten previously posted items for you to test your memory::
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2009/12/set-317.html
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Rob H." wrote

I never thought that 1815 would have been used as a choker in logging with a rope. It must been an old application, like horse or oxen logging.
I made these over forty years ago. We used molten zinc to hold the buttons on the end of the cable. A well made choker broke before the button came off. I understand they are swaged on the cable now.
Any idea how the button was connected to the rope? This is definitely the weak point. Like I said, maybe for horse drawn logs. Hook up any kind of machinery to it, it will break or the button will come off.
By the way, growing up in logging community, I am very familiar with chokers. It was the bottom rung of the ladder in logging, the choker setter. It was also the leading cause of death and amputations in logging at that time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think your analysis of this one is correct. Someone sent me this photo that they had shot at a museum, after I posted it I found out that the larger piece is original but the rope and other piece were added for display.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Rob H." wrote

AHA!! I knew I was right.
Of course, working in a cable shop and actually making these things helped a little.
Thanks for geting back to me on this Rob.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lee Michaels wrote:

Still is the bottom rung of the ladder. Although the newer chokers are easier with the open latch. But it's still real easy to lose a finger or get hit with a loose butt.
I agree with you that rope wouldn't handle the strain. That's why I said it looked like a prop in my first post.
--
Steve W.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Steve W." wrote

Those chokers don't stay on the logs all the time and when they become undone or break, human flesh is often hit with devestating results.

Same here. I knew that a rope would hold up for about two seconds in the woods, so I guessed a home made cattle noose made with a recycled part. It never occurred to me that it was a display. The rope is what threw me off.
Why would they display it in an inaccurate manner?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lee Michaels wrote:

There are a LOT of items on display in museums that are incorrect. Many times it's simply because they went on the word of the donor, who may have used the item for something entirely different than what it was designed/intended for. You see it a lot at farm machinery displays and antique shops.
--
Steve W.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not defending this rope, but I seem to remember rope chokers being used in helicopter logging in the TV series "Ax Men". Can't find any photos, though. Kerry (son of two loggers)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The young men doing this were called chokermen here. Most of the chokers I have seen just had a steel eye spliced into the ends. I can't imagine that flimsy thing holding a real tree, like the ones we have here in British Columbia!
I have seen them in use here, one uncle owned a small logging company when I was young. He took me to see his last steam donkey engine working when I was 5 years old!
Steve R.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rob H. wrote:

1814 A test string of high voltage insulators.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rob H. wrote:

1814 indicates gallons of gasoline delivered from an old-fashioned pump. There's a decent picture at http://www.kansastravel.org/agheritagepark.htm in the picture titled "Farm gasoline pumps and cans". It's in the tallest pump, inside the glass at the top.
Back in the bad old days, people wanted to *see* their gasoline measured out. The station operator would pump gasoline up into the glass and then drain it into the container or car or whatever.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.