What is it? Set 313

This week's set has been posted:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Rob
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1789 Is clearly used to divide a line into from 2 to 10 equal segments.
1790 Guess: Leather creasing press.
1791 Curling Stone.

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1789 - Tool for marking "box joints"?
Bill
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1790 is what we used to use for cutting asbestos shingles.
Regards,
Tom Watson http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
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wrote:

Yes, text on it stated exactly that.
Rob
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1789: Divider, used for marking equal widths across a board. The device can split a width into anything from 2 to 10 equal pieces.
1790: A nutcracker, for really tough nuts? Ok, this may not have been the generally intended use for the pictured hardware.
1791: Curling stone in a wooden box.
1792: The back of a bus or train seat, showing a holder for schedules.
1793: Ice fishing apparatus (a trap or tip up?) designed to trip when a fish hits your line.
John
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Or for making parallel lines on a cake? lol. I would like to have one to use as a rake when motorcycle camping to get the ground smooth under my tent!
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1790: An asbestos shingle cutter.
1791: A curling stone eh.
1792: A protective cover for the cutting edge of an axe.
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1791. A curling stone in some type of box or carrier. This I recognize because there is a curling rink right down the street from me.
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wrote:

1791 is a curling rock, but that's all I've got.
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Rob H. wrote:

1789 - Scale divider.
1790 - OLD Manual shear.
1791 - Kind of looks like the top of a curling stone.
1792 -
1793 - Riot shield.
1794 -
--
Steve W.

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1791 is definitely a curling stone, although and an old one with a metal goose-neck handle. Should have a leather washer between the handle base and the stone, sometimes a coloured identifying collar (green for leads, yellow for second, red for vice, blue for skip depending on the club). Newer style has a one piece plastic handle. Amazing how many people recognize this lesser known sports equipment.

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Ray Field wrote:

Only reason I know it is due to Utica NY having a curling club. http://www.uticacurlingclub.org /
--
Steve W.

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Not really -- I expect many here are old enough to have seen the Beatles' "HELP!"
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But I was too young at the time to remember any curling.
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said:

"British, what can you expect ..."
"White Cliffs of Dover?"
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1789)    This is for equal spacing for holes for rivets used to join     metalwork when making aircraft. You place marks for the end two     rivet holes, and then stretch it so the desired number of rivet     holes is represented by the proper number of points, and drag it     through layout die to set where to drill the holes. (Actually a     tool which I would like to own. :-)
1790)    Either a sheet metal shear, or a machine to punch a set number     of holes. Nice and rigid, in any case.
    It looks as though it is also set up to punch individual holes     using the hook-shaped part on the left in the photo.
1791)    A curling stone. Probably from Canada.
1792)    Weird. Sort of like a frog for a sword scabbard.
    Sort of like a protective edge for a hatchet or axe     blade.
    Sort of like something to be gripped and the edge pounded into     something.
    Not really sure. It is hard to tell which part is metal and     which is leather, given the coloration of both, though some     decorative and protective metal is obviousl
1793)    This looks to me like a riot shield with what looks like an     electronic flash mounted to it -- which suggests perhaps a     camera on the other edge.
    Not sure how many people would have seen these -- other than in     news footage.
1794)    Another strange beastie.
    If the lever were not so skinny, I would think that it is a     lever operated punch, but this does not look solid enough for     that, so perhaps it is something which is tripped to pop up a     warning flag on the end of the long whip like lever. Perhaps     tripped by a wire, or a shot when used on a target range, or     something similar.
    Now to see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Apparently submitted by a 7 inch tall visitor.
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1791 might be a curling rock. Never met one in person. I only used to go to the curling rink for hobby shows.
Steve R.
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