What is it? Set 310

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Back at it with another set this week:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Rob
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1776. The gas engine of one of those tether car racers. http://amrca.com / Thanks Karl
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wrote:

This answer is correct, and that's a great link, thanks.
Rob
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wrote:

Henry Kissinger was a lot younger when the photos were taken ...
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1771 Guess... Egg scale and perhaps the thing on the right is a candle (lamp) to sort and grade eggs.
1772 Can't even make one guess... gotta make two. Either an oil drip sump, to catch oil drippings from a flywheel or gear, or a water pan to wet a grindstone.

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Alexander Thesoso wrote:

1772 is a dip tank for finding leaks in tires . If you overfill it you're going to have wet feet ...
--
Snag
wannabe digital machinist
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1771 egg sizer and candler
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1771 combination egg candler and weight scale
1772 water trough for finding holes in skinny tires
1773 handle remover - for faucet stems?
1774
1775
1776 model boat engine? model airplane engine?
Dave
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On 11/12/2009 1:21 AM Rob H. spake thus:

So I've got a vested interest in this set, as I'm the one who submitted #1774. I have no idea what these are, so I'm looking forward to any enlightening responses.
One additional clue, if it's not obvious from the pictures, is that these are painted olive drab. Military issue?
--
Who needs a junta or a dictatorship when you have a Congress
blowing Wall Street, using the media as a condom?
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wrote:

Quick guesses: 1771 - A form of ballistic pendulum, perhaps, to measure the potency of gunpowder? If so, I'd assume the numbers are some scale of gunpowder potency.
1772 - Clearly this is a metal trough shaped like a portion of a rather skinny cylinder. Perhaps it is or was used to locate leaks in inner tubes, by filling the trough with water and looking for bubbles whilst immersing different parts of the tube. Obviously, it would work best for skinny tires, such as bicycle, motorcycle, or old cars have.
1773 - Looks to be a small specialized press of some sort, possibly for the insertion or removal of bushings, engine valve guides, or similar things.
1774 - Early ill-favored ski binding? No real ideas.
1775 - This appears to be a bracket to hold some cylindrical unit in place, such as a fire extinguisher. Presumably, the knobs inside the ring interlock with depressions in whatever is held. I do suspect appearances may be deceiving here, though, and this is not actually such a bracket.
1776 - Model airplane (presumably) glow-plug motor, a relatively large model. These are rather amazing little devices, I think, since they are diesel two stroke motors and are thereby about as simple as an explosive engine can be--no valves, no spark timing gear, often (unlike this one) no muffler or exhaust system beyond ports in the sides of the cylinder wall.
Now to read other guesses.
--
Andrew Erickson

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"Andrew Erickson" wrote:

Not a glow plug engine.
Glow plug needs a battery only until engine starts, then it is self sustaining which is why they are so popular because of their light weight.
More likely it is the predecessor of the glow plug engine.
Lew .
Lew
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It's a conventional spark-ignition engine. Through the '40s, at least, most larger model engines had spark ignition.
--
Ed Huntress



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True about the glow plug engines--marvelously ingenious little gadgets. I (wrongly) assumed that the wire would be removed once the engine was started, or perhaps thought it led to a more convenient external connector for starting. Certainly, not my first misstep in these weekly games!

I'm no expert, but I believe at least some (indeed generally larger) model engines still use spark ignition. Small airplanes these days often use electric motors, presumably made practical by advances in battery technology (Li-ion cells that have a quite large power density and can withstand pretty rapid discharge rates).
--
Andrew Erickson

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"Andrew Erickson" wrote:

Not sure what the R/C guys use these days.
I quit building and flying about '53-'54.
At one time must have had at least 20 different engines with names like:
Arden, OK Herkimer, O&R, Fox, OS(Early Japanese), Spitfire, and more that have evaded me.
Lew
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I have two Olson & Rice spark ignition engines in my collection, a .60 and a .29.
Steve R.
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"Steve R." wrote:

Had a 0.60 that I was going to use to build an air compressor to shoot dope but never got around to it.
For a model engine of that time, it was a beast.
Lew
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(smacks head!) Oh, That kind of dope!!
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FWIW, I have an O&R bicycle motor -- probably around 30 cc or so. It's a bit noisy for a bike motor but the old sucker still runs great. I don't think it ever saw much use.
--
Ed Huntress



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Right. In the old days, even fairly small engines used spark ignition. My uncle, who held several model boat records and built his own engines, had a supply of miniature spark plugs from Germany during the '30s -- which, of course, dried up. <g>
But I remember seeing those tiny engines in airplanes during the '50s. The spark coil was almost as big as the engine, and resided in the fuselage around where the cockpit would be.
Before glow plugs, the alternative was compression ignition -- pseudo diesels. Of course, they're still around.
--
Ed Huntress



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In the early days, pylon racers.
Interesting factoid: A lot of the larger displacement model engines are going back to spark ignition. The solid-state ignition similar to what Briggs came up with for theirs works nicely in the modeling sizes.
LLoyd
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