What is it? Set 297

I need help identifying two of the tools this week:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Rob
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1693 looks like a center drill for a round tenon.
1694 looks like a lens spanner or perhaps a spanner for spokes on spoke wheels.
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3/4" dowel 24" long
CYA Steve
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One end of a dressing stick, an aid for people with limited mobility to dress themselves
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Thanks! Looks like you nailed it, I'll let the owner know what it is.
Rob
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1693. Cork drill for chemistry labs. Here's a fancy one: http://www.cesci.net/details.php?id=631 Karl
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1693 - I think it's a borer for _rubber_ stoppers, rather than cork stoppers. I believe that cork borers are almost always hollow.
1696 - Hay bailers
1698 - portable overhead crane -- I'd guess from a boatyard.
Northe
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Rob H. wrote:

1693 -
1694 -
1695 - "helping hand" Used for many things in stores and shops. Mainly used to reach items on upper hooks, shelves on the store walls. I use mine for V belts.
1696 - Stationary hay/straw press. Precursor to the modern balers in use today. You feed it using two people and hay forks to load through the top opening while the ram is up. It gets pressed and then tied/wired into shape by a person on the output side.
1697 - I use the ones in my safe to store my good fishing equipment!
1698 - Gantry crane. Can be used for many things. Some with different wheels are used in boat yards to launch boats, others used indoors for just about anything.
--
Steve W.

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1697 Is it the door to a gun safe?
Larry C
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Without looking at anyone elses answers, I'll go with 1696 - Very early baler, hand fed with loose hay, straw, etc. 1698 - Looks to me like a boat hoist, uses web straps to pick up from trailer, then can be rolled out on a double rail slip and lower into water, or reverse procedure.
Norm
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1693: hand drill press, for some kind of metal strap. Maybe to prepare barrel hoops for riveting? A strap in the aperture would be centered for the drill.
1694: spoke wrench, but for something bigger than a bicycle. Wheelbuilding for a Model T, perhaps?
1697: looks like the inside of a door to a gun safe (long rifle rack).
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If the wheel were without a tire, this could be a screwdriver to engage slots on the sides of the nipple head while held on-axis to the spoke. It's not deep enough for a transverse wrench for flats on the nipple shaft (even if there were flats there).
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wrote:

My guesses:
1693 - Drill press to make a cross hole in a piece of shafting or thick tubing; possibly used to prepare a (cast iron?) pipe for receiving a tap of some sort.
1694 - A wild guess: this is used to remove the clips that hold manual car window winder knobs on their shafts. These are, at least in my limited experience, usually a spring clip sort of arrangement, stuck behind/within the hub piece of the handle, and rather difficult to remove with everyday tools. If this is indeed the use of this tool, I'd expect the handle to be craned off to one side.
1695 - At first glance, this appears to be a cleat or hook of some sort, perhaps for hanging something (like a bicycle wheel or ladder). The dowel may have been a further supporting member.
1696 - Possibly a flax breaking machine, used as one step in the production of linen from raw flax.
1697 - Rack for some long skinny things, along the lines of pool cue sticks.
1698 - A pair of gantry cranes, presumably used to load and/or unload truck trailers. That seemed very obvious, so I feel I must be missing something important here....
Now to read other answers.
--
Andrew Erickson

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E Z Peaces wrote:

How many do you want? The clip tool I have includes one side that pops the clip halfway out, then pull the door handle or window crank off. The clip then gets snapped back into the slot so you can reinstall the handle. The handles themselves just get pushed on over a tapered shaft.
This tool wouldn't work for the standard window/door clips though. The handle would be in the way. The clips in question are usually flush with the back edge of the handle assembly and the tool has an offset handle because of that.
--
Steve W.

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E Z Peaces wrote:

The E clip isn't the same as whet is used on door handles and such.
http://www.drewprops.com/graphics/article_photos/2006/civic-repair_001.jpg
http://i.ehow.com/images/GlobalPhoto/Articles/4722167/JesusClip_Full.jpg
Is the standard clip used on those items.
Bottom tool in this set is the common tool used for them.
http://www.matcotools.com/ProductImages/dt6000ma.jpg
Top and middle tools are used for the door trim clips
--
Steve W.

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wrote:

From the angle in the picture, I can't be sure whether the blade part is lined up axially with the handle, or is offset some and laying more or less flat on the background. Neither the shadows around the blade nor the angle of the camera lens is steep enough for me to tell for sure, and drawing various lines through the picture is likewise inconclusive (except to suggest that the blade and handle might not be perfectly concentric, not too surprising for a wooden handle mounted (presumably) with a tang and a ferrule).
--
Andrew Erickson

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    Following up in rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
1693)    For drilling a hole centered in the width of rather tough     material, and without the aid of a power drill.
    I would expect a high pressure lubricant on those threads, given     that use.
1694)    A split ring spanner -- it engages two slots in a threaded     ring 180 degrees apart to allow rotating it. Examples would     include the backs of better quality "waterproof" watches, but     those would need a wider spacing for the two points.
    Perhaps this is for collars mounting potentiometers (volume     controls) or phone jacks (connectors) in tight spaces.
1695)    It looks sort of like a hook which would be used in pairs for     hanging a bicycle on the wall of a garage -- though I'm not sure     about the 3/4" dowel. Perhaps that was for mounting it     somewhere unusual.
1696)    It looks like something for crushing sugar cane -- except that     I don't see a means for collecting the sap from the cane.
1697)    It looks as though it might be a rack for storing pool cues or     something similar.
1698)    Two rolling gantry cranes -- though they might be connected     together by the left legs. Double hoists which run along the     I-beam which makes up the top to adjust for the width of     whatever is being lifted.
    Given what is in the background, I think that they may be for     removing containerize cargo units from a truck, or putting them     back on.
    Another possible use would be for lifting a boat out of the     water (by straps under it) for work on the hull. But I would     then expect a bit more visible rust at the bottom of the legs,     and wheels designed to run on railroad type rails for pulling     the boat out of the water and onto the land.
    Now to see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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    I would have liked to see other angles of view photographed.

    Well -- thicker would have to be machined down thinner at the end to match the thickness of the slots in whatever was being turned.
    And usually, phone jacks would be mounted to a panel where there would be plenty of access from the other side.
    But I like another suggestion which I saw which had it being used on the spoke nuts in a wheel prior to mounting the tire. The design of the rim would normally provide clearance for the angled tip.
    And it may have started life as a chisel or something similar, and been modified with a file to become what it is now. I know that I have done similar things when I needed special tools.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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I'm heading for the American Threshermans show in Pinckneyville IL, in about 15 minutes. They have a bailer similar to 1696 in operation. Maybe I can get some pictures and find a place to post them.
http://www.americanthresherman.com /
RogerN
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If you post the photos I'll be happy to take a look at them.
Rob
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