What is it? Set 295

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I knew that! :)
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1684
Calthrops, a spiky device that has been used against infantry and horses since Roman times. This one's for use against pneumatic tyres - It's not just a spike, the tubes will also let the air out, even from most self-sealing runflat tyres.
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1681 is a Radio Shack soldering iron rest, to go with their Cheapest- of-the-cheap Chinese irons.
1683 is definitely an inertial platform; with 2-axes, it's most likely a ball horizon sender. (by 1968, that whole unit would fit over the span of a large hand, and totally enclosed -- I had one with a sticky bearing that would creep too much to be certified)
LLoyd
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1685 - could it be a Tabernacle? The notch in side would stabalize the wine bottle.

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1685: Possibly an outdoor telephone box?
Northe
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Rob H. wrote:

1681 - Soldering iron stand. Usually included with the low end irons.
1682 - Looks like retainer clip. Probably used to hold a wire in place to prevent damage.
1683 - Look like gyroscope units used to control something else.
1684 - NASTY Caltrop. That one looks like it was intended for traffic control to punch a hole in a tire. Smaller ones are used for anti-personnel use.
1685 - Key box from the looks of it.
1686 - Some type of shear?
--
Steve W.

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wrote:

Let's see here...I'm pretty sure of two this week, which is unusually high for me.
1681 - Cheap soldering iron stand (or possibly a woodburning pencil stand/rest, since the cheap ones are nearly the same appliance as cheap soldering irons). Probably came in the package flat, and the owner had to assemble by pushing the cutout bit upwards.
1682 - This appears to be a little yoke that snaps or slips onto something else, presumably so it can be better hoisted or tied down. It looks as though possibly tension on the small loop in the middle would tend to cause the barbs to engage and hold tightly, while releasing the tension would permit them to release. Without knowing the material it's made of (and how springy it is), it's hard to say for certain.
1683 - Looks to be a mounted gyroscope, probably part of a guidance system for an airplane or ship.
1684 - Tire puncturing doohicky used by law enforcement types to (try to) force a fleeing vehicle to come to a stop. The four equidistant points ensure that one is always going to be pointed up, regardless of how it falls, and the two hollow tubes provide a quick path for the air in the tire to escape.
1685 - Possibly this held a weatherglass for safekeeping? Purely a guess.
1686 - A tool for either crimping, bending, or cutting/notching sheet metal. Possibly used for flashing or roof drip edge or similar construction needs.
Now to read some other guesses.
--
Andrew Erickson

"He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain that which he cannot
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1685: watchman's key station; a watchman would have to walk his rounds and key-in at successive stations on a 'watch clock' that registered his evening's activity. Each station housed a different key.
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    Consider the length of chain to allow the key to reach the clock on different height watchmen -- and perhaps in awkward places where it is difficult to get close to the box.
    So the box contains the key, and a length of chain which is secured by the top screw of the three which secure the box to the wall. The chain runs down through the notch in the floor of the upper compartment, and is bundled in the bottom compartment with the key itself.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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1681: Match holder for pocket-rocket
1682: Holds a shaft onto a rectangular thing Looks more like a part than a tool in itself.
1683: Seismometer?
1684: Ceiling pitch checker
1685: Mailbox for unpopular people
1686: brake
--
It's times like these which make me glad my bank is Dial-a-Mattress

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    Posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
1681)    looks like the fold-out leg for advertising give-away desk     calendars, or perhaps plastic picture frames.
1682)    A clip for routing ribbon cables and round cables in a computer         case or somewhere similar.
1683)    An early example (perhaps even a prototype) of an aircraft     inertial guidance system (gyrocompass, artificial horizon, and     (apparently) a barometric altimeter (the stack of disks to the     left))
    The gyros (in side the housings in gimbals) are apparently     powered by three phase electricity -- maybe the 400 Hz common in     later aircraft, or perhaps even 60 Hz.
1684)    A welded-up caltrop(s). The original ones were scattered to     interfere with horse-bourne military.
    However, since this one is fabricated of hollow tubing, I think     that it is one intended for use by police to let the air out of     automobile tires. It punches through, and provides a very fast     exit pass for the air.
1685)    This looks like a night watchman's station. It is bolted to     a wall, and contains a special key which records the particular     station number onto a paper tape driven by a clock which the     night watchman carries around -- thus proving that he was where     he was supposed to be when he was supposed to be there.
    The key is attached to a chain which terminates in the upper     compartment with one of the bolts which secure the station to     the wall. It then runs down through the notch cut in the floor     of that partition and into the bottom box where the key lives.     The chain allows enough free travel to easily fit into the     keyhole on the clock, but keeps it there to keep the watchman     from carrying all the keys to one place as the start of his     shift, and simply marking the clock at the right times without     being anywhere near the places he is supposed to be for most of     the night.
1686)    A hand-operated shear for cutting something at right angles     to the long edge (which fits in the tray to the side of the     jaws. It could be for ribbon cable, or parts of terminal strip     kits, or any of a number of other things.
    Now to see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
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1683 The electrical bits are a dead giveaway. It's probably an early autopilot.
Steve R.
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1686 i have seen similar tools for cutting metal window blinds to fit perfectly into the window
greetings from germany Chris
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