What is it? Set 295

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Just posted a new set:
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Rob
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1683: I've never seen one of these in the flesh but I would hazard a guess at an early sperry gyrocompass sender unit or an artificial horizon sender unit. it seems to have a number of compensating gizmos around it and the woodwork looks decidedly aircraft. this would be the sender back in the fuselage that drives the pilot's instrument.
1684: looks like something made quite recently but I'm guessing the original would have been dropped behind the lines in WW2, in the thousands along roads, to spike the tyres of enemy vehicles. I dont know what they were called but dropped on to the ground one spike always pointed up.
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Stealth Pilot wrote:

"Caltrop". The basic design dates back to the Romans or earlier. There's a photo of that very item on the wikipedia page for "caltrop"--a fine point of the design is that the hollow tubes make them effective against self-sealing tires.
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J. Clarke wrote:

...
...
Dang!!! In reading Caesar I didn't learn the Romans ever faced Gauls w/ vehicles that had inflated tires!!!
--


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On Thu, 30 Jul 2009 13:22:10 -0500, dpb wrote:

They'll also spike horse feet, or a sandal. >:->
Cheers! Rich
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Those were made of solid metal since nobody cared whether air came out of feet or hooves. :)
There's a fellow at the SCA Pennsic War who does an iron smelt every year and forges something out of the produce. One year it was caltrops with three-inch spikes. OUCH!
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dpb wrote:

No, of the design of that particular caltrop.
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J. Clarke wrote:

Man, I figured folks could see a joke w/o it being pointed out to them...oh, I forget, it's usenet; how silly of me.
--
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I believe the Romans used "Stimuli" around their forts to cripple attackers. Caltrops were used in the middle ages to cripple horses.
Steve R.
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Steve R. wrote:

...
... Yeah, I was joking entirely on the implication of pneumatic tires at the time...
I'm pretty sure "caltrop" isn't in Caesar at all; origination appears to be roughly 1000 AD according to OED (from similarity to plant w/ a thorny head/sticker somewhat like what we call a "goathead")...
--
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dpb wrote:

The word isn't, but the object apparently is, only in latin it's supposed to be "murex ferreus"--the entry in vicipedia for that term (not that vicipedia is necessarily correct) contains a photo of the very same object we are discussing or one very, very much like it. This usage is also supported by "A Dictionary of Roman and Greek Antiquities" by Anthony Rich, published in 1881.
Quintus Curtus, writing around the time of Caesar, uses the term: "Nondum ad iactum teli pervenerant, cum Bion quidam transfuga, quanto maximo cursu potuerat, ad regem pervenit nuntians, murices ferreos in terram defodisse Dareum, qua hostem equites emissurum esse credebat, notatumque certo signo locum, ut fraus evitari a suis posset" in discussion of the campaigns of Alexander, several hundred years before. Whether his description of the Alexandrian use is correct or not, clearly he was familiar with the term, and if he knew a military term, it is difficult to imagine Caesar not knowing it.
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J. Clarke wrote:

C'mon, John, we don't /all/ speak/read Latin. Translation, please...
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Morris Dovey said:

Allow me. I did Latin O-level.
"None to throwing telly came through, with Bion who fled across, as much as possible running he could, to the king came through announcing, Maurice's ferrets in the earth - um... thing... of Dareus, whose cavalry was sent out to be believed, and to note for sure the sign of the path, that the German girls ran out at his very own, he could."
(I scraped a C. And I must admit I was joking about Maurice's ferrets. In reality "ferreos" is probably "railway" or something like that.)
--
Richard Heathfield <http://www.cpax.org.uk
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Richard Heathfield wrote:

Methinks your C is much more reliable than your Latin. :)
ROFL (Si, I have no ferrets today...)
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Morris Dovey wrote:

I don't speak or read it either--but about halfway through you see "murices ferreos", which would be the plural.
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A murex is a very spiny sea snail, also know for producing a purple dye, with which rich Romans dyed their togas, and orthodox Jews still dye their tassels. So a "murex ferreus" would be an "iron sea-snail".
Nick
--
Nick Wedd snipped-for-privacy@maproom.co.uk

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Nick Wedd wrote:

Be careful with your assumptions--the use of a word in modern biology does not necessarily reflect its use in classical Latin. In this particular case Aristotle did call certain sea snails "murex" but it was apparently also used to refer to a "sharp stone" or "projecting rock", and murex shells do often have various points sticking out, some of them quite long, so one can easily imagine them being referred to by the same name as sharp stones or that a caltrop be named after them.
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Great guess, they are gyroscopic controls for an airplane.
Rob
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1682 - looks like the thing that holds hooks on per boards.
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says...

Lobby meant peg boards, and he is right.
--
Go to http://MarcDashevsky.com to send me e-mail.

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