What is it? Set 290

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1653 - A woodturner's sizing tool ... it's clamped onto a parting tool to turn to a specific diameter.
1655 - Possibly a set of rowels to transfer patterns either to cloth or wood.
1656 - Farrier's nails ... I've also used these in making stained glass windows to hold the glass and lead caming temporarily in place while assembling the window.
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1651- It's gonna drive me nuts, I've seen one, somewhere...
1653- wood turning diameter setting tool
1654- fuel pump, but for what is the trick I think
1655- I'm going top say for making dotted lines in stencils
Dave
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hi all, again some silly guesses from germany.
1652 early distance meter for maps?
1654 diaphragm pump? http://www.kfz-tech.de/Membranpumpe.htm
1656 horseshoe nails
greetings from germany chris
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1651 bullet hole plug for rubber boat - think Navy Seal Team (a Swiss army rubber boat with these plugs is for sale in the latest Deutsch Optics catalog) - the photo in the actual catalog shows the olugs. www.deutscheoptik.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath!&products_id29
1652 a German artillery gage for aiming some kind of field gun? Guessing here,, I don't really have an 88 in the back yard.
Joel in Fllorida
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Rob H. wrote:

1655 I think these are for leatherworking, to impress edge patterns
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wrote:

I'm not sure how much assistance I'll be able to offer. The only one I'm at all certain about is not an unknown.
1651 - Looks culinary to me; I'd guess maybe a pusher for use in a food mill (of the cone-shaped sieve sort of design). Most I've seen aren't ribbed like this, but perhaps for seedy foods like tomatoes the grooves keep things working more smoothly.
1652 - Some specialized caliper, I'd guess for directly reading the strength of e.g. metal I-beams or similar, maybe for use by persons performing field inspections of structures (where corrosion may have weakened the beams).
1653 - This would appear to be another tenon cutter, for cutting round tenons on work spun in a lathe.
1654 - Possibly a fuel pump and regulator for a four cylinder fuel-injected diesel engine.
1655 - Wild guess: engraver's tools for making patterns, cross-hatches, etc.
Now to read other guesses...
--
Andrew Erickson

"He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain that which he cannot
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1651. Since it is a conical wooden screw, it could be used to force something open. Perhaps it was used to open oysters without killing them in the cultured pearl industry.
1655 Embossing and perforation tools. They are used to emboss, stencil, create folds, and perforate. They can be used on paper, cardstock, leather, and metal. When used on paper and cardstock, the wheels can be used to create tear-off lines. They can also be used to transfer patterns. Look up "Embossing Wheels" and "Embossing Tools" on Google Images to see similar tools.
1656 Horseshoe nails.
Carl G.
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This sounded correct to me but the owner of these tools had this reply:
"I don't think these are either embossing or pouncing tools. They are much too fine. The coarsest tool is 6/32" diameter with 18 teeth on the circumference. This would roll out to 32 dots per inch. The finest tool is 3/32" diameter with 50 teeth on the circumference. This would roll out to 200 dots per inch. It also doesn't explain how the .05 inch ball and the pointed instruments fit into this."
I don't know anything about embossing, anyone agree or disagree with his response? One more thing, the tool with the pointed end was covered with an epoxy-like material, which may or may not be related to its actual purpose.
Rob
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    I still believe that they are tools for doing artwork on stencils for Mimeograph/Hectograph type machines. The toothed wheels draw dotted lines (and can be used to fill in texture in drawings on the stencils), while the 0.050" ball would make a large black area (or wide line) and the pointed one would make a narrow line.

    Not sure about the epoxy-like material -- other than perhaps to protect the point against damage, or the user against perforation from the point. I would expect it to be stuck into an eraser instead, though the rubber of a really old eraser might turn into something which looks like epoxy over the number of years which have been involved. My work with the Memeograph/Hectograph tools was back around 1959-1960.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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| Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564

When I was involved in a hobby shop, we brought them in as tracing tools. They could be used to trace parts on a drawing directly onto balsa wood. I think there are many other uses. I have one of the modern ones here.
Steve R.
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This sounds like a tool used in sewing to transfer chalk dust to fabric by punching through a tissue paper plan.
Joe Gwinn
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I haven't been able to verify any of the suggestions but I changed my answer to read:
Embossing tools, these could have been used on leather, cloth, paper or metal, to stencil, fold, transfer patterns, or create designs. They could also have been used as tracing tools and for doing artwork on stencils for Mimeograph/Hectograph type machines.
Thanks to all who replied.
Rob
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Another thought on 1651. Perhaps this is a pestle. The grooves could be used to break up pills against a flat surface before before they are put into a mortar for final pulveriztion. The grooves would also make a nice grip.
Carl G.
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Rob H. wrote:

1655: Pouncing tools for transferring a pattern to a surface, like: http://www.truefresco.com/frescoshop/popup_image.php?pID2 One can dust powder through the indentations to mark the surface.
--Winston
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Rob H. wrote:

1651 -
1652 - Scale tool for maps?
1653 - Looks like a lathe tool with a gauge guide.
1654 - Mikuni fuel pump off a two stroke engine. Uses the vacuum pulses from the crankcase to pump the fuel.
1655 - They look like tools used in scrimshaw work.
1656 - Horse shoe nails, NEW ones. Original hand made don't have the nice heads on them.
--
Steve W.

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    Posting from Rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
1651)    An intersting thing -- and I would like to see it from     a view at the big end.
    My guess (and only a guess) is that it is a bobbin for thread,     twine, string, or something similar which is designed to pay off     the small end of the bobbin. (It is typically mounted with the     big end down, and an eye loop dead center above it through which     the string or whatever passes before it goes to where it is     used.
    If there is no hole in the big end for mounting it, I withdraw     my guess. :-)
1652)    Designed for measuring the distance between two points, and     reading it out in one of the scales which make sense for the     application. Looking at the scale designations at the left-hand     end of the arcs of the scales, I would guess that it is for     measuring distances on maps of different scales.
    And it looks as though it reads in two different measurement     systems. The ratio of the markings on the nearest (and largest)     arc suggests to me that it is not meters vs yards, as the ratio     is too large. (That should be 1.093:1 and this looks more like     1.3:1)
    It could be anything, including rather old units of distance     measurement given that it appears to be from somewhere in     Europe, where older systems hung on for a long time.
1653)    Not sure. Perhaps for comparative measurement of things in     the process of being machined. Perhaps for scribing lines in     things to be machined.
1654)    A manifold which accepts gasses or fluids in one set of     connections, and passes them out through another based on the     one-way valves on each. From the back view input is from the     fitting at about 11:00 O'Clock, and it is filtered through the     sintered bronze filter at about 2:00 on the inner area.
    Whatever is connected to the similar one-way valve at about 6:30     goes out from the bottom compartment. At a guess, the vertical     cylinder molded in is a pressure regulator to limit the flow     from the upper to the lower compartment.
    There are at least two push-on fittings and one threaded fitting     in the upper compartment, and one push-on in the lower     compartment.
    There must be a gasket between the visible face and the mounting     plate, which might have other passages as well between the     halves.
    At a guess, I would suggest that it is part of an automobile's     vacuum controller or perhaps to feed gasoline to two different     carburetors.
1655)    These look like tools for drawing on Mimeograph stencils. The     wheels make dotted lines, the tiny ball end makes solid lines.
    Since these were from Yugoslavia, they probably were used with a     similar machine made there.
    They work by crushing a film which also can be crushed by a     typewriter to allow the ink to bleed through to the paper being     copied.
1656)    Square (cut) nails -- very old designs, still used for some     things to maintain period authenticity. These look as though     they were more machine produced than the original hand cut ones     were.
    Now to see what others have said.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
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1651: Looks like a stopper, usable on different sized bottles.
1652: My first guess would be used in navigation, but I'd expect two of the scales to be nautical miles & mile or nm & km, and they aren't.
1653: Seen it before, didn't know then either. Maybe for leatherworking?
1654: A strange mixing valve with 2 ins and 4 outs. Perhaps a heat exchanger also?
1655: Toilet paper perforators. The machinery wasn't reliable so they had people do it by hand. Different size wheels for different grades of paper.
1656: Nails for attaching wood to masonry?
--
It's times like these which make me glad my bank is Dial-a-Mattress

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1655 Tracing tools
Steve R.
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1652: Appears to be a military map calculator, converting distances into various numbers.
The "Austrian and Hungarian" patent number would presumably help date it.
"Vorposten" means "outposts". "Marsch" means "march". "Lager" means camp, or stores. "Colonnen-lngen" means "convoy length"
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