What is it? Set 289

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I'll be back to the usual Thursday schedule next week.
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Rob
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1645 Guess... It is about 8 inches long = about 200 mm. That makes the front square about 50 mm. square. That makes the vertical distance between the pairs of guide posts on the front about 16 mm. So one could lay a strip of 16-mm. film across the front. There seems to be a registration pin. Close the front with the diffusing glass. With a simple lens and shutter, though I don't see either, this could be a camera to make enlargements of frames of a 16-mm. film.
1646 Satirical Guess... Crowd control implement purchased by the DHS for about $1500.
1648 It would be impolite for me to suggest photoshop.

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1645: Still copy camera for making copies of individual movie-film frames.
1646: Fish pacifier.
1647: Shingler's hammer.
-- Ed Huntress
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1646: Fish pacifier sounds like a good guess. I'm thinking a "tire knocker" for checking truck tires.
Nahmie
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Nahmie wrote:

1646: Another possible use:
When I was in grad school, I worked under a research grant from the U. S. Bureau of Mines. The work involved (not surprisingly) going into various coal mines. Most of the mines were okay to visit. They were much like a typical heavy duty manufacturing environment. I.e. protect yourself from noise and don't get run down by the equipment and you will be alright.
However there was one coal mine that I remember still (35 years later) as being a major exception. The coal seam was only 3 feet high and since no one pays to move extra rock, the mine was only 3 feet high. So we were duck walking around and still banging our helmets on the roof. The mine was wet so we were duck walking in the mud. On this visit I was with a MESA (Mine Enforcement and Safety Administration now MSHA) inspector. He had a stick very much like 1646. One of the problems in coal mines is that digging a mine exposes rock layers to moisture and temperature changes. This can cause the rock layers to delaminate and then fall. For instance a 2 inch layer of rock which might be a dozen feet across will weight several tons and it will ruin your day if it lands on you. The mine inspector would use his stick to tap the ceiling. If we heard a hollow sound then we would quickly move somewhere else.
Dan
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I don't know which was its original purpose, but I've seen one exactly like that used for subduing bluefish, on a head boat. Since I have an engine lathe I prefer my all-aluminum model. <g>
-- Ed Huntress
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On Wed, 17 Jun 2009 22:22:42 -0400, "Ed Huntress"

1646. that's what it is. it is called a "priest". it gives the last rights to a fish. whack! :-)
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wrote:

I don't think its a priest. They are usually smaller, and almost always have a significantly heavier head or else are made of something with much more mass than wood, such as brass. This looks to be a tire knocker (which looks very similar to a priest).
--riverman
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On Thu, 18 Jun 2009 04:37:16 -0700 (PDT), riverman

I'll buy that. surely though its use as a tyre knocker is nearly useless. the pressure can be easily read directly, which is what you want. tyres fail through a process that gets them hot so a hand on the tread to feel for a warm one is surely more effective? that's what I use. Stealth Pilot
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On Fri, 19 Jun 2009 10:16:32 GMT, Stealth Pilot
<snip>

If you are hauling an eight axle dual wheel trailer with a tandem axle semi-tractor, that makes 42 tires you need to check several times a day. Do you really think a truck driver uses a tire gauge on all of them each time :)
If you let one tire of a dual set go soft or worse yet flat and keep on trucking, you'll have a nice fire going before long. A tire thumper used regularly will locate that soft tire before it becomes a flame thrower.
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
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Stealth Pilot wrote:

It's a tire knocker, sold in just about every truck stop in the US, Canada and Mexico. They run about 15 bucks.
When you do your pre-trip you walk around the rig and thump every tire. (there are at least 19 tires you check at least twice daily) You listen for the sound of the tire when it is hit. A tire with full pressure almost rings when you hit it, one that is low will make a lower note and one that is flat just makes a thud. Do it a few times and you can tell without a gauge. Heat won't tell you much on a big rig tire. They ALL get hot when loaded.
--
Steve W.

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The official name is a 'priest', but I don't think this is one. I think its a tire knocker.
--riverman
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1645 electron microscope camera?
1646 I'm certain I've held one of these in my hand but CRAFT disease has hit. removable spoke/handle from some sort of windlass?
1647 at a guess would be a coopers tool for forming wooden barrel staves and knocking up the barrel.
1648 are two huge crucible tongs. the one on the wheels would be used to position the crucible near the mould and the underslung handles used to rotate the holder to tip the melt into the ingate. the one on the walls maybe to lift a crucible up out of a top loading furnace.
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That's what I was thinking until someone posted this link on the web site:
http://www.shorpy.com/node/4886?size=_original
I haven't found any crucible tongs like the ones in the photo.
Rob
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1650 resembles an escape from your seatbelt in a burning car knives.
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agreed.
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1645: make still pictures from film (16mm or so)
1647: Planing, splitting and nailing wood shingles (or siding)
1650: seatbelt cutter
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Rob H. wrote:

1645 - Looks like an early panoramic camera. Could also be one use for astronomical exposures.
1646 - "Tire Buddy" brand tire knocker. Used to thump tires on big trucks looking for low/flat tires by the different sound they make. Technically illegal in many states as it falls under the "any other weapon" clause.
1647 - Looks like something a cabinet maker might use to set inlaid panels?
1648 - LARGE iron worker tongs. The pair on the cart look like rail alignment tongs. The others look like splitter tongs but the lower jaw isn't real clear.
1649 - Looks like the end of a connector on a rope harness for horses/oxen.
1650 - Boker Cop Tool, I have that exact same tool. Works OK but I like the folding one they make better. Takes up less space in my turnout pocket. (Jim Wagner Rescue Knife for those interested)
--
Steve W.

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1646 Fish whacker. For---ummm-----whacking fish!
1650 Kind of easy--given that the BOKER name is visible. http://www.kk.org/cooltools/archives/003750.php
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Bill Marrs wrote:

Do you keep it in a 'whacker' basket? ;-)
--
You can't have a sense of humor, if you have no sense!

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