What is it? Set 279

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    Posting from Rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
1585)    You pull a webbing strap through it (or leather, I     guess), and when you relax your pull it pulls the jaws closed if     the strap is in contact with the hinged jaw. Not as much     tension as a ratchet strap, but good for holding things down in     general.
1586)    A style of "wiggler" used for centering a workpiece in a 4-jaw     chuck (where each jaw is individually adjustable). You place     the sharp point at the end of the ball in a center punch, or the     ball itself in a center-drilled hole, with the rectangular shank     in the toolpost, and adjust the cross-feed until the other end     from the ball/point end is near the center in the tailstock.
    As you rotate the chuck, the free end draws a circle in the air     whose diameter is a function of how far off center the workpiece     is. So -- you adjust jaws until the end is stationary through a     full revolution of the chuck.
    Note that the rod can slide in the gimbal, and the closer the     gimbal is to the workpiece the larger the circle at the free end     will be.
    It is no longer made, based on a catalog from the late 1990s.
1587)    No idea -- sorry.
1588)    I *like* it. A neat trade (or hobby) specific door knocker.
1589)    Hmm ... a strange one, but I have a couple of guesses.
    1)    A tool for laying rope (center line goes through the         hole in the center, and three others go through the 3/4         circle notches, and you turn the handle around it as you         go along the length of the rope being made.
    2)    A bobbin for weaving nets (fairly large opening ones.)
        The line being carried by the bobbin wraps through the         three notches, and is unwound a notch at a time as you         need the extra length.
1590)    For measuring the thickness of sheet metal. (Or perhaps wire.)
    The handle protects the knuckles of the user from the edges of     the metal.
    You turn the disc until the end of the screw clamps the sheet     metal against the anvil.
    The numbers (starting next to the '0' at about 5:00 o'clock     indicate the gauge thickness of the metal. (There have been a     number of measurement systems for sheet metal and wire, and I     can't tell which of the systems is used on this one. But in all     of the systems the large the number, the smaller the thickness.
    This represents the number of passes through rollers which make     it thinner each pass. Note that this goes through about 1 and     1/3 turns before it gets from the "0" which is when the empty     gauge closes to the "0" which is quite thick -- and it goes on     to "00" at about 1 and one-half turns.
    Note how steep the threads are. Those are mult-start threads,     (three or four, I think) so 1-1/2 turns take you from fully     closed to fully open.
    Now to see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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On 9 Apr 2009 23:04:43 GMT, "DoN. Nichols"

Howdy,
The scale makes me wonder if it is for measuring the thickness of leather in "Oz." (64ths of an inch) - (but the narrow jaws seem to counter that.)
All the best,
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Kenneth

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    Also the observable fact that the larger numbers come with the smaller gap, which is common with wire and sheet metal gauges, which are smaller the more times they have passed through drawing dies or between rollers. To measure in "Oz" (unless you mean in Australia :-) you would need the numbers to increase as the gap increases.
    Also -- if it were reading in 64ths of an inch, the numbers would be equally spaced, instead of getting more widely spaced as the numbers get smaller.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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I think 1585 looks much more like it is up side down. I'm betting it is for picking up something of fairly uniform thickness like heavy plate that only holds while the load is in tension. I know it is not the typical ice tong type and I would worry about picking something as slick as steel plate. bit I don't see its use in rigging or rope work of any type.
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wrote:

My guesses--only the first and the last carry any small degree of certainty:
1585 - This looks to be a rope holder/tensioner, such as might be used on a sailboat. I don't know the official nautical term offhand. The rope can be pulled between the jaws towards the hole for the mounting bolt, but will bind when tension is applied in the other direction. This particular one lacks any loop over the top to prevent the rope from pulling out obliquely, so it's only usable for loads in the plane of the base of the gizmo.
1586 - I think I've run across pictures/descriptions of this tool, but can't remember the name or purpose. I think I might have a vague recollection that it's for setting up machining operations somehow.
1587 - Possibly a tool for holding corrugated metal in place during assembly, say for joining two sheets at their edges?
1588 - Small anvil with drop hammer, I'd guess for jewelry making or similar light work.
1589 - Patent neo-gothic doohicky thingamabobber. The pointed end looks as though it may be intended to bind onto nails, as to pull them out, but the rest of the implement doesn't look at all suited for that task.
1590 - Thickness gauge, I'd guess for sizing wires, but possibly for sheet metal instead.
Now on to other people's ideas!
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    How about "jam cleat"?

    Yes -- but the material is wrong for sailboat use. It is drop forged steel -- and would rust like mad in such an environment. For a sailboat, the materials should be either bronze or a tough plastic like Delrin -- perhaps with internal parts of stainless steel, if there were springs which are common in actual jam cleats.

    Yep.
    Nope -- not given the thin anvil, the material, and the mounting holes. It petty much *has* to be a blacksmith's door knocker.
    [ ... ]

    I *think* sheet metal, but I'm not positive.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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1586 looks like a wiggler, for truing up stock in a lathe.
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1585: A clutch for part of a block and tackle rig.
1586: For transferring a dimension of some sort, not sure what.
1587: Perhaps for installing an escutchen plate over a lock handle.
1588: A hammer and anvil. If the hammer is attached to the horn I imagine this is some sort of modified piece, as it would make the horn useless. Or it is possibly intended as a musical instrument rather than a metalworking tool (in which case the horn shape is merely decorative)
1589: Possibly a fancy plumb bob... 1590: some sort of specialized thickness gauge.
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