What is it? Set 279

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Might be another difficult set, there are three that I need assistance figuring out:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Rob
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1585: lifting eye for sheet goods
1588: hammer and anvil designed to give a controlled blow to test the malleability of a metal sample.
1590: sheetmetal thickness guage
basilisk
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Just great! No one else had answered so I had a chance to be first. I didn't recognize or even have a clue about a single one.
Feeling a little dumb. Rob, I really appreciate your efforts at doing this, I look forward to Thursdays.
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1585. Looks sort of like a cam cleat for rope or line.
Karl
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1585 - Sailboat hardware. A cleat to hold a line against tension. It releases when the line is pulled the other way.
1589 - a tool used for sewing nets with heavy rope?
1590 - a thickness gauge, an old micrometer, but clearly the question is for who?
John
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1590 appears to be a thickness gauge - possibly for metal sheet.
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1586 is a center finder, used on a metal lathe

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1586: Looks like a centering indicator to be clamped in a lathe tool post, the point rides on a part chucked in the lathe and the other end exaggerates any out of true motion - I think they are called "wobblers". Now replaced by dial indicators. Joel in Florida ========

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Others have noted #1590 being a thickness gauge... I would suggest that if you told us how many TPI the screw we could figure out which gauge is being measured on the dial. It looks to me like the first revolution from tight reads off gauges 3.5 to 35 or 40, and the second revolution reads off gauges 00 to 3.5 with the next half turn. I would hazard a guess that gauge 00 must be about 3 times bigger than gauge 11, and 1.5 times bigger than gauge 3.5. This seems to not be AWG, but maybe British SWG.
Tim.
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On Thu, 9 Apr 2009 06:54:59 -0700 (PDT), Tim Shoppa

It looks like the standard sheet gage used in the US, and the lead of the screw is 1/4". 7ga is about 3/16", about 90 degrees on the dial is 11ga (~1/8"), and another 90 degrees to 16ga (~1/16"). Birmingham Sheet Gage is similar.
The tool could be used in a warehouse or a rolling mill. Starrett makes (or made) large rugged micrometers with a wooden handle for this sort of duty.
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Ned Simmons

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A couple weeks ago I took a few quick shots of this tool at an auction, it belongs to someone else so I can't tell you the TPI.
Rob
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revolution Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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Is there an "American standard wire gauge"?
I tried AWG first but the ratios were all wrong. We know from the photo that 1/3 of 00 gauge should be about 10.7 gauge, but that doesn't even come close to AWG.
British or Imperial Standard Wire Gauge does have the right ratios, as does Birmingham and Stubbs, but AWG can't be right. In the middle range a lot of gauges were fairly close to BSWG and I can't really rule them out either.
Tim.
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    Aside form that, given the rather steep observable angle of the threads, we would need to know how many "starts" (parallel interleaved threads).
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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1585. Obviously a cleat or clamp of some sort. I think it's a cleat used to clamp down on a tarp being stretched over something. There are similar cleats on boats, but the ones I've seen have two movable "arms" not just one. On our sailboat, my Dad called these "jamb cleats" or "monkey cleats". Never understood the second term.
1586. An old "wobbler" style center finder for a lathe. I only know this because my machine shop teacher in VoTech showed us a lot of "olde tyme" tools/tricks.
1587. That's a puzzler. Is it possible there is a part missing? Does the metal part thread into the wooden handle?
1588. Some sort of apparatus for drop testing or testing impact sensitivity of a material. Could be used for anything from testing resiliency of a plastic to sensitivity of explosives.
1589. Plumb bob?
1590. A thickness gauge of some sort? But the graduations and calibrations seem to be in a logarithmic not linear scale.
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I just heard back about your second question, the metal part does unscrew from the handle.
Rob
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1588 Based on absolute ignorance, I'll suggest that this is a cute door-knocker by/for a blacksmith enthusiast.

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Good guess, door knocker is correct.
Rob
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It is a silly thought, but it would be amusing to contemplate this door-knocker coupled to a delay/amplifier so that if it were struck it would produce the ting-Clang of a blacksmith/apprentice strike.

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1589 looks like an old style fid for splicing wire rope.
Len
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