What is it? Set 277

This week I need some help with the tool with the hooks on the end, number 1576:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
A few months ago I posted a photo here on the newsgroups of a strap that someone was trying to identify, he finally figured out that it was meant to be bolted to the rear of a TV base and then screwed to the table or shelf to prevent it from toppling forward. The link below shows the strap, in case anyone didn't see the original post:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/Album10/_9dsc000021.jpg
Rob
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1577. Fireman's catch net. For people jumping from burning buildings. 1578. Air powered siren for a fire engine or police car. Karl
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wrote:

1577. Fireman's catch net. For people jumping from burning buildings. 1578. Air powered siren for a fire engine or police car. Karl
1574. Lawn edger. 1576. Not certain, but Grandfather used to have a virtually identical (It had a 1.5" long piece of rod perpendicular to, and just forward of, the "handle part" to hook your fingers around) home made tool to put strain on mesh type sheep fencing. Designed to pull at a junction of the mesh. Later, Uncle put a row of them on a bar with a curved lever attached, to strain the entire height of the fence at once.
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1574 Manual lawn edger?
1575 Bumper jack. Picks up one whole end of vehicle. Common in tire stores when vehicles had steel bumpers.
1576 Tool to grab something and hook it on something else? No idea what. Fencing?
1577 Firemans "catcher". Popular in old cartoons.
1578 Siren.
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1573- counts out a crapload of something! 1574- separates concrete sections and applies the edge finish. On a sidewalk, for example, each 'section' isn't poured in it's own form, you run the tool to break the somewhat set concrete down to the depth of the big wheel, and then when the sidewalk cracks, that's where it will do it. 1575- bumper car lift (woe be to he who tries to use it on a modern car) 1576- hook it around some piece of wire you need to pull sideways out of the way... 1577- fireman's catcher 1578- siren
Dave
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1577, The old fireman's safety net. You jump off the building while the fireman tried to make sure you landed in the middle. I saw a demo of this in second grade by the local fire department. It was not all that precise. The guy who jumped barely made in into the middle.
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1573: Early Doomsday clock 1574: for making a slot in the soil for planting seeds
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wrote:

Wowsers, I actually have a reasonable idea on it!
1573 - Seems to be some sort of odd hybrid metric multi-city clock, perhaps (wildly guessing) of French revolution origins? Unless perhaps the decimal hand and the base-12 hand of the units are unrelated to each other...very strange.
1574 - Holder for wheeling out twine or tape along the ground, or possibly for handling a distance measuring wheel (the wheel part being obviously missing)?
1575 - Rather obviously a portable lift of some special use; maybe for motion picture cameras and cameramen.
1576 - I suspect this is a tool for forming splices on telephone/telegraph/electric mains overhead wires by twisting one wire around the other ("Western Union Splice"). I suppose it could also form a similar splice in wire fencing, although I suspect that most people wouldn't be bothered to go through the work to do it properly.
1577 - Catcher for persons jumping/dropping from heights, such as might be held by the fire brigade for the rescuing of persons, or perhaps by stuntmen.
1578 - This appears to be an early microphone, maybe condenser but far more likely ribbon or carbon. Looks a bit on the large side for that, but not impossibly so.
Now to read other guesses....
--
Andrew Erickson

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Rob H. wrote:

1573 -
1574 - Lawn edger
1575 - Hydraulic bumper lift. Not real usable today due to the lack of solid bumpers. However they do work well on P/U trucks and IF you can catch the frame rails. Also work good on small tractors.
1576 -
1577 - Catch net OR circus target depending on era of use. Folds in the middle so you can move it easier.
1578 - Good old mechanical siren. They are making a comeback on apparatus now because unlike the common electronic sirens you can actually hear them for a long distance and you cannot out drive the siren.
--
Steve W.

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"Steve W." <> wrote in message > Rob H. wrote:

Several years ago I came across one of these sirens. It was an ambulance siren WWII vintage. That thing would keep winding up if you let it. So, I got the 'bright' idea to set it up for a doorbell in the shed with a large red button outside and a big 12v battery to drive it. Most people only got as far as a low whine but then the UPS gal got here and she is the brave sort. She hung on that button and didn't let go! Needless to say, that was the end of that!!! ;>)) Now I've got a couple of semi-truck air horns......hhhmmmm need a can of compressed air....;>))
phil
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"Phil Kangas" wrote

tank of air that he would fill at the gas station. Between the horn and the tank, there wasn't much room left in that little trunk. It was an attention getter. Everytime he blew that thing, people wh\ ould frantically start looking around for a big truck, thinking they were in the way. And if somebody was loitering in a crosswalk, it scared them right out of the way!
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I was fascinated a few years ago reading about guys putting train horns on their stuff. There was even one fella that rigged his Goldwing with a small compressor and some Nathans. Iggy could put some of his compressors to use and Steamboat Ed could add to his calliope.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1VCyyHcAvM

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"Rob H." <> wrote in message

1576 looks like a spring tool to me............for dealing with tension type springs. phil
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    Posting from Rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
1573)    I would say that it was a clock for showing the time in three     different world locales -- except that there appear to be 100     "minutes" per hour, and 13 "hours" per "day"
    Hmm ... I think that I have seen something similar inside the     doors of bank vaults -- perhaps for setting the time before the     door may again be opened?
    It looks as though it is designed for easy setting of the hands     by gripping the knobs -- and the unusual feature of having the     "hour" hand above the "minute" hand so the shorter hand will     clear the knob on the longer hand and vice versa.
1574)    For cutting fabric or carpet to match the edge of a platform?
1575)    A jack for lifting an older car or truck by the bumper -- full     width? Or maybe it reaches in from the side and lifts by the     frame rail on that side?
    Hydraulic pumped jack of some sort anyway
1576)    For gripping and hooking in place a heavy spring in a     typewriter or TeleType?
1577)    A "net" for catching jumpers from a house on fire? Supported     by multiple firemen around the border, and the jumper tries to     hit the central red dot.
1578)    At first glance it looks like an old microphone, but the size     and the mounting say no.
    So -- an external mount siren for a police or fire vehicle?
    Now to see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.     
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wrote:

1573: Not a clue.
1574: For trimming something, assuming the wheel has a sharp edge. Given the length, trimming something while walking.
1575: Bumper or motorcycle lift?
1576: For pulling wire or fencing? I'm not sure why the gap between the hooks is ther. Maybe for twisting wire together? If so, the handle looks like it's wrist pain incarnate.
1577: A target, obviously. For dwarf tossing? I thought about a firemen's net, but 10' seems small for that.
1578: Siren
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"Dave Balderstone" wrote

Doncha know?? Those are the "little people".
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Very interesting. Here's one online
http://www.electronichouse.com/slideshow/category/4061/672
--riverman
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1574 big tin opener ???? 1575 a vehicle lift maybe for trucks. 1576 a tool for pulling out springs to locate them over a lug. 1577 it looks a little like the trampoline my daughter has in the garden but i am going to guess its for catching people jumping from burning buildings. 1578 vehicle horn ????
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